http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/rss.xml/RK%3D0/RS%3DOHaWrOoIjKBdCpZTQJequIK6XxI- en Earth Day free downloads from Don't Move Firewood! http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/earth-day-free-downloads-dont-move-firewood.html <p>Getting ready to educate kids and adults during your upcoming Earth Day celebration? Download our free materials today, and help save trees and forests from invasive forest pests!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Don&#39;t Move Firewood Coloring Sheets</strong></p> <p>- <a href="../../resources/dont-move-firewood-coloring-sheet-alb-version-2">Asian longhorned beetle coloring sheet</a></p> <p>- <a href="../../resources/dont-move-firewood-coloring-sheet-eab-version">Emerald ash borer coloring sheet</a></p> <p>- <a href="../../resources/dont-move-firewood-coloring-sheet-firewood-version-1">Firewood Users coloring sheet</a></p> <p>- <a href="../../resources/dont-move-firewood-coloring-book">All three as a Coloring Book</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Don&#39;t Move Firewood Insect Masks</strong></p> <p>- <a href="../../resources/asian-longhorned-beetle-mask">Asian longhorned beetle mask</a></p> <p>- <a href="../../resources/emerald-ash-borer-mask">Emerald ash borer mask</a></p> <p>- <a href="../../resources/goldspotted-oak-borer-mask">Goldspotted oak borer mask</a></p> <p>- <a href="../../resources/gypsy-moth-masks">Gypsy moth mask</a></p> <p>- <a href="../../resources/walnut-twig-beetle-mask">Walnut twig beetle mask</a></p> <p>- <a href="../../blog/halloween-bug-mask-collection.html">Find out all about our forest pests masks here</a></p> <p><a href="../../resources/gypsy-moth-masks"><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/images/GypMothumb(1).png" style="width: 231px; height: 301px;" /></a></p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/earth-day-free-downloads-dont-move-firewood.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates earth day earth day 2014 forest pest masks free download free handout insect mask Thu, 17 Apr 2014 18:09:06 +0000 L. Greenwood 1715 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Oak firewood from Missouri to Colorado? http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/oak-firewood-missouri-colorado.html <p><strong>Dear Don&#39;t Move Firewood,</strong></p> <p><strong>I am wondering about moving oak firewood from Missouri to Colorado.&nbsp; If it is legal do we need a permit or something to go across different states?&nbsp; If you could please let me know I would appreciate it. </strong></p> <p><strong>Thank you,</strong></p> <p><strong>Two Missourians</strong></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Dear Two Missourians,</p> <p>Thanks for asking about firewood. It is illegal to remove any hardwood firewood from the state of Missouri due to the presence of both state laws and the federal emerald ash borer quarantine, with a very specific exception for hardwood firewood that has been heat treated and packaged at a federally certified commercial kiln facility. My guess is that you are asking about private firewood- so the answer is definitely that you cannot legally move oak firewood from Missouri to Colorado. There is no permit that would make bringing untreated (regular, not commercially heat treated) oak firewood from Missouri to Colorado OK.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Good luck with your trip, and please purchase firewood when you get near your final destination in Colorado!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Here are some good resources:</p> <ul> <li> <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/the-problem/state-state-information/missouri.html">Missouri&#39;s Don&#39;t Move Firewood Regulations and Recommendations Summary</a></li> <li> <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/the-problem/state-state-information/colorado.html">Colorado&#39;s Don&#39;t Move Firewood Regulations and Recommendations Summary</a></li> <li> <a href="http://www.aphis.usda.gov/plant_health/plant_pest_info/emerald_ash_b/downloads/eab_quarantine_map.pdf">Emerald Ash Borer Federal Quarantine and Authorized Transit map</a></li> </ul> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/oak-firewood-missouri-colorado.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates colorado firewood regulations dear don't move firewood firewood movement missouri firewood regulations Thu, 10 Apr 2014 15:00:38 +0000 L. Greenwood 1713 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org We are reviewing intern applications now http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/we-are-reviewing-intern-applications-now.html <p>Curious what&#39;s up with your application to be an intern with Don&#39;t Move Firewood? We closed the application period on Monday night and are now reviewing the many applications. We are SO EXCITED about all the really great applicants.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>We hope to conclude the first round of reviews this week, and will be contacting potential interviewees next week. Most importantly, we can already tell that we&#39;ll have many more awesome people apply than we could ever hope to hire, so THANK YOU for all your interest!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/images/EABcostume.png" style="width: 250px; height: 384px;" /></p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/we-are-reviewing-intern-applications-now.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates internship paid internship summer intern summer internship Thu, 10 Apr 2014 14:47:01 +0000 L. Greenwood 1712 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org We are hiring summer interns! http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/we-are-hiring-summer-interns.html <p><strong>Enthusiastic conservation interns needed for two positions (one 3 months, one 6 months) in Western Massachusetts with Don&#39;t Move Firewood&#39;s summer campaign! </strong>Our interns will travel to events throughout the region to educate the public about the issues tackled by Don&#39;t Move Firewood- talking about invasive forest pests moving on contaminated firewood, and how people can help look for and report pests. Experience speaking with the public is crucial, a background and/or education in forest issues, conservation biology, or other related field is desirable.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>To apply, visit <a href="https://careers.nature.org/psp/tnccareers/APPLICANT/HRMS/c/HRS_HRAM.HRS_CE.GBL?Page=HRS_CE_JOB_DTL&amp;Action=A&amp;JobOpeningId=41992&amp;SiteId=1&amp;PostingSeq=1">The Nature Conservancy&#39;s Job Listing #41992</a>. Applications are due <strong>before April 7th 2014.</strong></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Please note that a small glitch in this listing sometimes makes it look like the interns will be based in Boston. They will not be in Boston. They will be based in Great Barrington, MA.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Do not apply via any email or form found on Don&#39;t Move Firewood&#39;s main site. You must go to <strong><a href="https://careers.nature.org/psp/tnccareers/APPLICANT/HRMS/c/HRS_HRAM.HRS_CE.GBL?Page=HRS_CE_JOB_DTL&amp;Action=A&amp;JobOpeningId=41992&amp;SiteId=1&amp;PostingSeq=1">the TNC Careers listing</a></strong> or your application will not be considered. Thank you!</p> <p><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/images/SolidSound2013_2(1).jpg" style="width: 300px; height: 225px;" /></p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/we-are-hiring-summer-interns.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates don't move firewood hiring don't move firewood intern don't move firewood summer intern Wed, 12 Mar 2014 16:51:15 +0000 L. Greenwood 1709 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Wood chips from Virginia to Colorado? http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/wood-chips-virginia-colorado.html <p><strong>Dear Don&#39;t Move Firewood,</strong></p> <p><strong>I would like to bring some hickory wood chips (from a tree on my property in Virginia) to Colorado for my son to use for smoking meat. I don&#39;t want to move any infestation to Colorado, but hickory does not seem to be on any Virginia or Colorado site as a problem tree and as these are just chips, so would it be okay to transfer them to him? </strong><em>(ed. note: lightly edited for clarity)</em></p> <p><strong>Yours,</strong></p> <p><strong>Virginia Resident</strong></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Dear Virginia Resident,</p> <p>At first glance, bringing hickory chips from Virginia to Colorado seems like it might be OK- but it is actually in violation of the North American Gypsy Moth quarantine. Because gypsy moth egg sacs are commonly laid on all sorts of trees in Virginia (including hickory trees), and because the egg sacs are pretty small and could easily pass undamaged through a chipper, you can&#39;t bring hickory chips from your tree in Virginia to your son&#39;s place in Colorado.</p> <p>Here&#39;s a complete explanation provided by John Kaltenbach with the Colorado Department of Agriculture:</p> <p>&quot;This is actually a very good example of a risk that is not so obvious. We do not have Hickory in Colorado, but we also do not have gypsy moth. There is a federal quarantine for the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/gallery-of-pests/european-gypsy-moth.html" target="_blank">European gypsy moth (<em>Lymantria dispar</em>)</a>&nbsp;&nbsp;that includes most of Virginia (<a href="http://www.aphis.usda.gov/plant_health/plant_pest_info/gypsy_moth/downloads/gypmoth.pdf">see map</a>). Anything that the gypsy moth can lay eggs upon is subject to the USDA gypsy moth quarantine and is not to be moved without treatment. Hickory is a host tree for gypsy moth, so that increases the possibility that gypsy moth egg masses could be laid on the hickory tree being cut down. One gypsy moth egg mass may have up to 500 eggs and some will survive chipping.&nbsp;</p> <p>While this may seem like an unlikely transfer of pests, that is how many of them have traveled across the country. Twenty years ago Colorado had two separate infestations of gypsy moth that were successfully eradicated. We do not want to spend the time and effort eradicating this pest again.&quot;&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Here are some good resources:</p> <ul> <li> <a href="http://www.aphis.usda.gov/wps/portal/aphis/ourfocus/planthealth?1dmy&amp;urile=wcm%3apath%3a%2FAPHIS_Content_Library%2FSA_Our_Focus%2FSA_Plant_Health%2FSA_Domestic_Pests_And_Diseases%2FSA_Pests_And_Diseases%2FSA_Insects%2FSA_Gypsy_Moth">Extensive listing of information on both Asian and European gypsy moth</a></li> <li> <a href="http://www.aphis.usda.gov/plant_health/plant_pest_info/gypsy_moth/downloads/gypmoth.pdf">Current map of European gypsy moth quarantine areas</a></li> <li> For information on treatment and compliance with the plant pest quarantines in Virginia contact the USDA, SPHD at&nbsp;<a href="tel:%28804%29%20771-2042" target="_blank" value="+18047712042">(804) 771-2042</a></li> <li> <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/the-problem/state-state-information/colorado.html">Colorado&#39;s Don&#39;t Move Firewood Regulations and Recommendations Summary</a></li> <li> <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/the-problem/state-state-information/virginia.html">Virginia&#39;s Don&#39;t Move Firewood Regulations and Recommendations Summary</a></li> </ul> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/wood-chips-virginia-colorado.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates firewood to colorado gypsy moth hickory chips virginia hickory Bugs Tue, 11 Mar 2014 16:26:28 +0000 L. Greenwood 1708 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org The Year In Invasive Forest Pests http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/year-invasive-forest-pests.html <p>Planning ahead? We recently looked up a slew of annually occuring events to help out a colleague, and thought we&#39;d post the results here for everyone to use:</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>February: </strong>Last week of February is National Invasive Species Awareness Week</p> <p><strong>March: </strong>Friday, March 21st 2014 is International Forest Day</p> <p><strong>April: </strong>Invasive Plant Pest and Disease Awareness Month</p> <p><strong>April: </strong>April 22nd is Earth Day every year.</p> <p><strong>April:</strong> Last Friday in April is National Arbor Day</p> <p><strong>May: </strong>Third week of May is Emerald Ash Borer Awareness Week</p> <p><strong>June: </strong>Saturday, June 14, 2014 is National Get Outdoors Day</p> <p><strong>August:</strong> Asian Longhorned Beetle Awareness Month</p> <p><strong>August: </strong>Tree Check Month <em>(in 2013 this was</em> <em>held as part of Asian Longhorned Beetle Awareness Month)</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>For individual states&#39; Arbor Day&#39;s (which vary greatly) try this <a href="http://forestry.about.com/cs/urbanforestry/a/arbor_day_date.htm">Forestry About.com article</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>If anyone knows of other awareness events that are relevant, please email us at <a href="mailto:info@dontmovefirewood.org">info@dontmovefirewood.org</a> so we can add them to this list!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Ed Note: This page is being periodically updated as new events and ideas are uncovered!</em></p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/year-invasive-forest-pests.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates arbor day 2014 Emerald ash borer awareness week NISAW tree check month Mountain Mon, 10 Mar 2014 21:25:04 +0000 L. Greenwood 1705 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Kiln Dried vs Heat Treated firewood http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/kiln-dried-vs-heat-treated-firewood.html <p>Packaged firewood comes in a lot of forms, and it is important for you to know the <strong>difference between kiln dried firewood and heat treated firewood</strong>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Kiln dried firewood is firewood that has been dried out, for some unknown period of time at some unknown temperature, in a kiln. It is a term without a firm definition, and with no legal standing. Kilns used for kiln drying can be set to lots of different temperatures and they can dry wood out a little, or a lot, and still label the wood kiln dried. <strong>Kiln dried firewood is NOT acceptable to move around</strong>, because of huge variations in how long, and how hot, the firewood was treated. It is completely <strong>NOT a meaningful label when it comes to forest pests and diseases</strong>. You cannot, for instance, take firewood that is simply labeled &quot;kiln dried&quot; out of a quarantined area for emerald ash borer. That is illegal.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Heat treated firewood is different. The makers of <strong>heat treated firewood hold a legal compliance agreement</strong> that the firewood is heated to a certain core temperature and for a certain amount of time. The heat treatment standard that is used most often is for 60 minutes to 60 degrees Celcius (140 degrees Farenheit) because this is the approved heat treatment level for emerald ash borer. The majority of the time,<strong> heat treated firewood is considered OK to move</strong> if it is properly labeled as such. There is notably some variation in heat treated firewood and various state and federal regulations. For instance, the required heat treatment level for firewood entering the state of New York is higher (hotter and longer) than the heat treatment level for firewood leaving an emerald ash borer quarantine area. However, in most cases, firewood labeled with a USDA APHIS seal (like the sample shown below) is considered safe to move across jurisdictional boundaries.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>And now you know!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/images/sp-federal_firewood_stamp_sample.jpg" style="width: 219px; height: 172px;" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/kiln-dried-vs-heat-treated-firewood.html#comments Quarantines firewood compliance agreement heat treated firewood kiln dried kiln dried firewood Thu, 06 Mar 2014 20:26:20 +0000 L. Greenwood 1703 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Private Campgrounds vs National Parks? http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/private-campgrounds-vs-national-parks.html <p>Dear Don&#39;t Move Firewood,</p> <p>My family and I are coming up in June to camp at the Jellystone Park in Gattlinburg TN and I was told by the campground I could not bring firewood. I live in Gwinnett county GA and I did not see it on the restriction list, I only saw Dekalb and Fulton county on the list for GA. I was wanting to know if I could bring my own firewood, it is oak wood. <em>(edited for length)</em></p> <p>Thanks,</p> <p>Camper from Georgia</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Dear Camper,</p> <p>Whenever you are visiting a privately owned campground, it is important to remember that they can set their own firewood rules- including stating that you cannot bring any firewood onto their property. I looked up that particular Jellystone park, and it indeed on private land, which means their management can regulate the movement of firewood onto their land in any way they see fit. Even though it is not illegal according to state law nor national park regulation (<a href="http://www.nps.gov/grsm/planyourvisit/firewood-alert.htm">Great Smoky Mountains Firewood Alert</a>) to bring oak firewood from that county in Georgia into the region near this campground, the Jellystone staff are within their rights to prohibit it as a private business. Now, if you were camping in the National Park itself, it would be considered legal to bring oak firewood from Gwinnett- but that brings us to the next point...</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>You would be moving this firewood really far- probably well over 150 miles, and that&#39;s a lot farther than what is generally acceptable. It might not be against the law, but it isn&#39;t a good idea. So please, leave that firewood at home, and buy some when you arrive at or near your destination.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Thanks for asking, and enjoy your trip in June!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em><strong>Curious about the states mentioned in this blog? </strong></em>Visit our <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/the-problem/state-state-information/georgia.html">Georgia</a> or <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/the-problem/state-state-information/tennessee.html">Tennessee</a> pages! Or head on over the National Park Service&#39;s <a href="http://www.nps.gov/grsm/planyourvisit/firewood-alert.htm">Great Smoky Mountains Firewood Alert</a> page.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/private-campgrounds-vs-national-parks.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates firewood rule tennessee great smoky mountains national park firewood jellystone park firewood rules Tent Thu, 20 Feb 2014 16:15:32 +0000 L. Greenwood 1698 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Thinking Spring! http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/thinking-spring.html <p>Here are Don&#39;t Move Firewood, we are gearing up for the annual spring rush of website traffic from the millions of people that will be planning their spring and summer vacations. Here&#39;s what we are up to:</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <ul> <li> We&#39;ve been subtly changing our front page messaging to work with some new research out of the Southern States Wildland Urban Interface project. This helps people find the information they really want- faster!</li> <li> The <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/100-words-project.html">100 words project</a> is in full swing, with a dozen state summaries now approved by our in-state colleagues. If we haven&#39;t gotten to your state yet, we will soon.</li> <li> Our resident pest expert, Faith Campbell, has been busy updating the pest information over at the <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/gallery-of-pests">Gallery of Pests</a>. This large resource of pest information is outstanding for anyone seeking in depth histories and details on invasive forest pests.</li> <li> Coming soon: our <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/the-problem/state-state-information/index.html">State-by-State map</a> is going to get easier to use (one fewer click for visitors!). This sounds like a minor change but it should greatly improve useability for our visitors from certain types of smartphones, and those on older browsers and computers.</li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/thinking-spring.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates don't move firewood map spring camping state firewood map state firewood regulation Bugs Tue, 18 Feb 2014 17:14:15 +0000 L. Greenwood 1697 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Look for signs of invasive forest pests during Great Backyard Bird Count 2014 http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/look-signs-invasive-forest-pests-during-great-backyard-bird-count-2014.html <p><strong>NEWS RELEASE --- For Immediate Release</strong></p> <p>Contact: Leigh Greenwood, Don&#39;t Move Firewood campaign manager<br /> <a href="mailto:LGreenwood@tnc.org">LGreenwood@tnc.org</a></p> <p>Download PDF version of this press release at <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/resources/Great-Backyard-Bird-Count-2014">http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/resources/Great-Backyard-Bird-Count-2014</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p align="center"><strong>BIRD WATCHERS CAN COMBINE GREAT BACKYARD BIRD COUNT WITH A BACKYARD BUG COUNT TO HELP PROTECT TREES AND FORESTS</strong></p> <p align="center">&nbsp;<em>Looking for signs of insect or disease damage in backyard trees and shrubs during the annual bird count can help preserve vital wildlife habitats</em>.</p> <p align="center">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Arlington, VA&mdash;</strong>February 7, 2014&mdash; Bird watchers participating in the 17th annual <a href="http://www.birdcount.org/">Great Backyard Bird Count</a>, February 14 to 17 2014, are encouraged by The Nature Conservancy to look for and report signs of tree pests like the emerald ash borer, Asian longhorned beetle, and other invasive insects and diseases. During the bird count, participants simply watch birds at any location for at least 15 minutes, tally the numbers of each species they see, and report their tallies online. Scientists at The Nature Conservancy want Great Backyard Bird Count participants to know that they should take a few extra moments to look at the birds&#39; habitats for signs of invasive forest insects and diseases.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&ldquo;Trees and forests are an essential part of our lives, and they provide clean air and water, jobs and products, and vital wildlife habitat. &nbsp;From tree-lined neighborhood streets to national parks, we count on trees to provide benefits today and for generations to come,&rdquo; says Bill Toomey, Director of Forest Health Protection for The Nature Conservancy. &ldquo;That&rsquo;s why it&rsquo;s critical for everyone to be aware of the trees around them and take simple actions to help protect them- such as looking for and reporting signs of insects or diseases.&rdquo;&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Many of the forest pests and diseases that affect trees can be stopped or slowed if they are found and treated early enough by the proper authorities. The Nature Conservancy&rsquo;s Healthy Cities, Healthy Trees program and Don&rsquo;t Move Firewood campaign, along with many state and federal agencies nationwide, are especially encouraging bird watchers to look for potential signs of forest pests while enjoying the Great Backyard Bird Count this year.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&ldquo;The Great Backyard Bird Count is an ideal opportunity for bird watchers to check the trees for signs of invasive pests like Asian longhorned beetle and emerald ash borer,&rdquo; said Jennifer Forman Orth, State Plant Pest Survey Coordinator at the Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources. &ldquo;The damage from these insects can easily be seen in winter, when there are no leaves on the trees, and birdwatchers are typically armed with a pair of binoculars that will help them check high-up branches for the perfectly round holes left by Asian longhorned beetles in maples and other hardwoods, or the increased woodpecker activity and removal of bark (&ldquo;blonding&rdquo;) caused by excessive woodpecker activity associated with emerald ash borer infestations in ash trees.&rdquo;&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Birdwatchers can download the new Birdwatcher&rsquo;s Short Field Guide to Holes in Trees, found at <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/resources/Holes-Trees-2014">http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/resources/Holes-Trees-2014</a>, to help them learn the differences between holes made by typical woodpecker and sapsucker foraging, holes made by woodpeckers seeking invasive insect larvae, and holes caused by the invasive insects themselves.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Participants in the Great Backyard Bird Count should report any suspicious damage or signs of forest pests as soon as they have concluded entering their bird data. Bird watchers are encouraged to take digital photos of any damage observed, identify the species of tree with the damage if possible, and then report findings using websites, state hotlines, or phone apps such as those found at <a href="http://apps.bugwood.org/healthytrees/">http://apps.bugwood.org/healthytrees/</a> .&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>For more information on regionally and nationally important invasive forest pests, and how to report potential signs of infestation, please refer to the websites below. &nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <ul> <li> Asian longhorned beetle, <a href="http://asianlonghornedbeetle.com/report-your-findings/">http://asianlonghornedbeetle.com/report-your-findings/</a></li> <li> Emerald ash borer, <a href="http://www.emeraldashborer.info/call.cfm">http://www.emeraldashborer.info/call.cfm</a></li> <li> Thousand Cankers Disease of Walnut, <a href="http://thousandcankers.com">http://thousandcankers.com</a></li> <li> Gypsy Moth, <a href="http://www.hungrypests.com/YourMoveGypsyMothFree/">http://www.hungrypests.com/YourMoveGypsyMothFree/</a></li> <li> Goldspotted Oak Borer, <a href="http://www.gsob.org">http://www.gsob.org</a></li> <li> Sudden Oak Death, <a href="http://www.suddenoakdeath.org/">http://www.suddenoakdeath.org/</a></li> <li> Laurel Wilt, <a href="http://www.fs.fed.us/r8/foresthealth/laurelwilt/">http://www.fs.fed.us/r8/foresthealth/laurelwilt/</a></li> <li> For other pests of high interest to the United States Department of Agriculture, please look up the appropriate state on the map at <a href="http://www.hungrypests.com/">http://www.hungrypests.com/</a></li> </ul> <p align="center">###</p> <p>Download PDF version of Holes in Trees 2014 birdwatcher handout at <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/resources/Holes-Trees-2014">http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/resources/Holes-Trees-2014</a></p> <p>Download PDF version of this press release at <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/resources/Great-Backyard-Bird-Count-2014">http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/resources/Great-Backyard-Bird-Count-2014</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>To learn more about The Nature Conservancy&rsquo;s Healthy Trees, Healthy Cities program go to <a href="http://healthytreeshealthycities.org">http://healthytreeshealthycities.org</a> . To learn more about <em>Don&rsquo;t Move Firewood, </em>visit <a href="http://www.DontMoveFirewood.org">http://www.DontMoveFirewood.org</a> .</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The Nature Conservancy is&nbsp;a leading conservation organization working around the world to protect ecologically important lands and waters for nature and people.&nbsp;The Conservancy and its more than one million members have been responsible for the protection of more than&nbsp;18 million acres in the United States and have helped preserve more than&nbsp;117 million acres in Latin America, the Caribbean, Asia and the Pacific. Visit us on the Web at <a href="http://www.nature.org">www.nature.org</a>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/look-signs-invasive-forest-pests-during-great-backyard-bird-count-2014.html#comments Pests in the News ash blonding emerald ash borer damage great backyard bird count great backyard bug count woodpecker damage Fri, 07 Feb 2014 16:47:54 +0000 L. Greenwood 1693 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org 100 words project http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/100-words-project.html <p>Have you ever tried to look up your <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/the-problem/state-state-information/index.html">state&#39;s firewood regulations on our map </a>and thought to yourself, &quot;Wow, I&#39;m still not really sure what I&#39;m allowed to do here.&quot; We here at Don&#39;t Move Firewood understand. A lot of state and federal firewood regulations are written in technical language, or so buried in a lengthy webpage that you can&#39;t really find them. Our new solution: the 100 words project.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Each state will have a summary written in 100 words or less, in plain English, of their firewood regulations- for everything in the state. This will include state regulations, federal regulations, and those that pertain to all sorts of specific parks and forests. We started in the farthest Eastern US in <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/the-problem/state-state-information/maine.html">Maine</a>, and we&#39;re working our way out from there. So far we&#39;ve written fifteen summaries and gotten formal approval from state officials from four of those states- almost 10%! Off to a good start.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Here&#39;s our approved list, so you can see what it will look like for your state:</p> <ul> <li> <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/the-problem/state-state-information/connecticut.html">Connecticut</a></li> <li> <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/the-problem/state-state-information/new-hampshire.html">New Hampshire</a></li> <li> <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/the-problem/state-state-information/rhode-island.html">Rhode Island</a></li> <li> <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/the-problem/state-state-information/vermont.html">Vermont</a></li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Hopefully this will prove to be a useful resource to all our visitors. Thanks for reading!</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/100-words-project.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates firewood map firewood regulation state map state regulation Truck Thu, 06 Feb 2014 21:48:45 +0000 L. Greenwood 1692 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Free forest pest printouts for kids and educators http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/free-forest-pest-printouts-kids-and-educators.html <p>This week we&#39;ve released a new set of ready-to-print coloring pages for kids. These are great for teachers, camp counselors, children&#39;s museums, and any sort of outreach event that includes kids. Here&#39;s a list of our new coloring sheet printouts, plus some of our older materials, and then some materials from partners- lots of options for you!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Don&#39;t Move Firewood Coloring Sheets</strong></p> <p>- <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/resources/dont-move-firewood-coloring-sheet-alb-version-2">Asian longhorned beetle coloring sheet</a></p> <p>- <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/resources/dont-move-firewood-coloring-sheet-eab-version">Emerald ash borer coloring sheet</a></p> <p>- <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/resources/dont-move-firewood-coloring-sheet-firewood-version-1">Firewood Users coloring sheet</a></p> <p>- <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/resources/dont-move-firewood-coloring-book">All three as a Coloring Book</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Don&#39;t Move Firewood Insect Masks</strong></p> <p>- <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/resources/asian-longhorned-beetle-mask">Asian longhorned beetle mask</a></p> <p>- <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/resources/emerald-ash-borer-mask">Emerald ash borer mask</a></p> <p>- <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/resources/goldspotted-oak-borer-mask">Goldspotted oak borer mask</a></p> <p>- <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/resources/gypsy-moth-masks">Gypsy moth mask</a></p> <p>- <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/resources/walnut-twig-beetle-mask">Walnut twig beetle mask</a></p> <p>- <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/halloween-bug-mask-collection.html">Find out all about our forest pests masks here</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Partner Resources and Pages</strong></p> <p>- <a href="http://asianlonghornedbeetle.com/get-involved/educate/">Asian Longhorned Beetle Educate </a>page with many downloads</p> <p>- <a href="http://massnrc.org/pests/alb/albmedia.htm#K-12">Asian Longhorned Beetle information from Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources</a></p> <p>- <a href="http://www.emeraldashborer.info/files/edpacket.pdf">EmeraldAshBorer.info Educational Packet</a> (warning: some of the phone numbers in this packet might be out of date, but the rest of the packet looks useful and accurate)</p> <p>- <a href="http://stopthebeetle.info/kidscorner/">StopTheBeetle.info, Emerald Ash Borer Kids Corner</a></p> <p>- <a href="http://plantheroes.org/">Plant Heroes</a> site, produced by American Public Gardens Association</p> <p>- <a href="https://www.plt.org/">Project Learning Tree</a> maintains a huge library of resources. You&#39;ll need to search for the specific item you are looking for.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/free-forest-pest-printouts-kids-and-educators.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates coloring sheet don't move firewood downloads forest pest education free printout Tree Wed, 15 Jan 2014 19:46:01 +0000 L. Greenwood 1686 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Firewood related non-profits http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/firewood-related-non-profits.html <p>Firewood is an interesting topic that touches a lot of different types of people, industries, and ideas. Here&#39;s a quick round up of <strong>non profits </strong>that work <strong>directly on firewood </strong>related issues, in alphabetical order:</p> <ul> <li> <a href="http://www.forgreenheat.org/">Alliance for Green Heat</a> &quot;promotes high-efficiency wood combustion as a low-carbon, sustainable, local and affordable heating solution.&quot;<em> from their <a href="http://www.forgreenheat.org/about/about.html">About Us</a></em></li> <li> <a href="http://www.afpda.org">American Firewood Producers and Distributors Association</a> &quot;developed to create a national standard and certification program for the production and manufacturing of firewood.&quot; <em>from their <a href="http://afpda.org/about-us/">About Us</a></em></li> <li> <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org">Don&#39;t Move Firewood</a>! That&#39;s us. We educate the public about the need to use local firewood or certified heat treated firewood to prevent the spread of forest pests. You can learn more about who runs Don&#39;t Move Firewood at our <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/about.html">About Us </a>page.</li> <li> <a href="https://nationalfirewoodassociation.org">National Firewood Association</a> &quot;dedicated to serving the interests of the firewood industry, consumers of firewood, and the environment alike.&quot; <em>from their front page, learn more on their <a href="https://nationalfirewoodassociation.org/mission/">Mission page</a>.</em></li> <li> <a href="http://www.woodheat.org/">WoodHeat.org</a> &quot;a nonprofit, nongovernmental agency dedicated to the responsible use of wood as a home heating fuel.&quot; <em>from their front page, learn more on their <a href="http://www.woodheat.org/about-woodheatorg.html">More About page</a>. </em>(Ed. note: this organization is incorporated as a non-profit in Canada, but provides ample information on both USA and Canadian interests.)</li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>If you believe we&#39;ve missed an important non-profit, please email us at info at dontmovefirewood.org to help us make this blog more informative.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>In addition to these five non-profits, there are a host of governmental agencies in both the USA and Canada that work on firewood issues. We&#39;ll cover those another day!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/firewood-related-non-profits.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates Alliance for Green Heat american firewood producers and distributors association don't move firewood firewood 501c3 firewood related non-profits national firewood association woodheat.org Fire Fri, 10 Jan 2014 17:08:06 +0000 L. Greenwood 1680 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Top 3 Frozen Forest Pests http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/top-3-frozen-forest-pests.html <p>Severely cold weather can greatly reduce populations of both native and non-native forest pests, giving the trees a temporary reprieve. Here&#39;s a quick round up of three forest pests very likely to freeze into tiny larvae-sicles during the Eastern and Central USA cold snap this week.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>1. <strong>Emerald ash borer </strong>is going to suffer. The larvae of emerald ash borer contain a natural antifreeze- but it only works to around -13F / -25C. After that, they freeze and die. Read this <a href="http://blogs.mprnews.org/updraft/2014/01/extreme-cold-may-wipe-out-high-percentage-emerald-ash-borer-larvae/">Minnesota Public Radio article</a>, or this <a href="http://www.fs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/stelprdb5191794.pdf">technical scientific paper</a>, to glory in their frozen demise. <em>Added 27 Jan 2014: On the other hand, some of the parasitoid wasps that kill and eat emerald ash borer are also vulnerable to extreme cold. Read all about that in this <a href="http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1049964413001965">scientific paper</a> if you want to get deep into the details.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>2. <strong>Hemlock woolly adelgid</strong> might not be woolly enough. It needs to be fully -22F / -30C to start killing hemlock woolly adelgids under their tiny wool coats, but that&#39;ll do it. Read the <a href="http://www.bioone.org/doi/abs/10.1603/0046-225X-32.3.523?journalCode=enve">scientific paper here</a>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>3. <strong>Southern pine beetle</strong>. It is native to the Southern US, but it is increasingly creeping north and becoming a pest of more northerly forests, like in <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/02/science/earth/in-new-jersey-pines-trouble-arrives-on-six-legs.html?_r=0">New Jersey</a>. Good news! It dies out when winters reach -8F / -22C. For more on bark beetles and when they freeze their tarsi off, <a href="http://www.dartmouth.edu/~mpayres/pubs/Fina.Cold.pdf">try this article</a>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Please note: cold events like this do not eradicate populations of insects- they just reduce them to much lower levels temporarily. Even just being insulated by snow can be enough to keep a few larvae alive at the base of a tree. And of course, you can&#39;t count on the cold to render your firewood safe to move, either- the wood in the center of the pile might be a lot less cold than the wood at the edges, permitting some survival in there, too.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em><strong>Edited 27 January 2014 to add:</strong></em> <a href="http://entomologytoday.org/">Entomology Today</a> posted an excellent blog in January titled, <a href="http://entomologytoday.org/2014/01/13/falling-temperatures-do-not-necessarily-mean-fewer-insects/">Falling Temperatures do not Necessarily Mean Fewer Insects</a>. I highly suggest anyone interested in this subject also read that article.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>H/T to <a href="https://twitter.com/foresthealth">twitter.com/foresthealth</a> for the HWA article!</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/top-3-frozen-forest-pests.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates emerald ash borer death hemlock woolly adelgid cold tolerance polar vortex polarvortex southern pine beetle cold tolerance Forest Wed, 08 Jan 2014 17:28:47 +0000 L. Greenwood 1678 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Firewood resolutions for 2014 http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/firewood-resolutions-2014.html <p>Do you want to protect trees and forests from invasive pests this year? Here&#39;s a list of resolutions to help you buy and burn firewood the right way.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <ul> <li> First, don&rsquo;t move firewood. That means use firewood from under 50 miles as a general rule of thumb- although<a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/the-problem/state-state-information/index.html"> in some places,</a> the rules can be 10 miles or even no movement at all.</li> <li> Instead, buy or cut, and burn, locally cut firewood.</li> <li> If you must move firewood, buy certified heat treated bundled wood</li> <li> If you or someone you know has already moved firewood, burn it completely. Do not take it back, do not leave it. Make sure to pick up and burn any bark that gets knocked off- those little pieces can have hundreds of insect eggs on them!</li> <li> Tell your friends that in 2014, you have resolved not to move firewood</li> </ul> <p>Thanks for everyone's support this year, and have a Happy New Year!</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/firewood-resolutions-2014.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates 2014 don't move firewood resolutions new year new years resolutions Forest Mon, 30 Dec 2013 16:33:34 +0000 L. Greenwood 1677 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Why do we talk about Christmas trees and wreaths? http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/why-do-we-talk-about-christmas-trees-and-wreaths.html <p>Christmas trees and general <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/HolidayGreenery">holiday greenery</a> is really different stuff from firewood- so why do we do we put so much effort into getting out the word during the holiday season? Simply put, our year round readers ask us a lot of Christmas tree seasonal type questions, and we&#39;ve decided to &quot;give the people what they want!&quot; Just like firewood, our advice is to <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/resources/holiday-greenery-press-release">buy local, and/or buy from a reputable dealer</a>. Christmas trees are actually a pretty well regulated product, so as long as you are buying from a licensed local business, your potential to accidentally spread pests is very low.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Two new resources as of December 2013:</p> <ul> <li> Did you know that you should look for, remove, and leave on site any birds nests you might accidentally find in a &#39;wild&#39; cut Christmas tree? We had a great discussion on the topic on our <a href="https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10151764970316651&amp;set=a.10150182892751651.302031.21635906650&amp;type=1&amp;theater">Facebook account on December 17th, 2013</a></li> <li> The invasive Balsam Woolly Adelgid doesn&#39;t travel on firewood, but it can travel on contaminated Christmas trees and wreath or garland material. All the more reason to buy from a licensed local business, not a &#39;fly by night&#39; tree dealer on the side of the road. Learn more about the <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_NyrrnjgxQg">threat of BWA to the Canaan Valley Fir here</a>.</li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>And here is our archive in case you want to delve deeper:</p> <ul> <li> All about <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/HolidayGreenery">Holiday Greenery</a>, including our catchy &quot;12 Tree Tips of Christmas&quot; (updated 11/2013)</li> <li> <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/resources/holiday-greenery-press-release">Buy Local, Buy Green press release for Holiday Greenery</a> (first released 2011)</li> <li> <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/christmas-trees-and-wreathes.html">Buying Christmas Trees and Wreathes</a> (2010 blog)</li> <li> <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/disposing-your-christmas-tree.html">Disposing of your Christmas tree</a> (2011 blog)</li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Lastly, here is a quick listing of other good resources on the topic:</p> <ul> <li> <a href="http://www.aphis.usda.gov/plant_health/plant_pest_info/holiday_greenery_pests.shtml">USDA APHIS Holiday Greenery Pests information</a></li> <li> USDA Forest Service press release, <a href="http://www.fs.fed.us/news/2013/releases/11/tree-cutting.shtml">Forest Service encourages safe holiday tree-cutting practices, 18 Nov 2013</a></li> <li> <a href="http://modernfarmer.com/2013/12/dear-modern-farmer-can-cut-christmas-tree-nearby-forest/">Modern Farmer&#39;s December 2013 blog on cutting your own tree</a>- highly informative!</li> <li> <a href="http://www.realchristmastrees.org/dnn/Home.aspx">National Christmas Tree Association</a></li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Happy Holiday season, everyone!</p> <p><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/images/xmas_tree_image-smaller.png" style="width: 200px; height: 285px;" /></p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/why-do-we-talk-about-christmas-trees-and-wreaths.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates a bug's war on christmas christmas tree pests christmas tree recycling cut a christmas tree cut your own tree holiday greenery Fri, 20 Dec 2013 18:35:51 +0000 L. Greenwood 1675 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org A few favorite resources for Firewood http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/few-favorite-resources-firewood.html <p>Ever wondered where Don&#39;t Move Firewood gets all its information? It is a mix of help from all the amazing partners we have (thanks, everyone!) and frequently scouring the internet for new ideas and information. Here&#39;s a few favorite places that help us think about firewood in the big picture.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <ul> <li> USFS Forest Products Laboratory runs a great blog named <a href="http://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/labnotes/">Lab Notes</a>.&nbsp;</li> <li> The EPA has a program named <a href="http://www.epa.gov/burnwise/">BurnWise</a> that delves deeply into all sorts of wood burning questions.</li> <li> There are a lot of great Twitter accounts useful to forest health education, here&#39;s a few handy ones that are updated quite frequently</li> <li> &nbsp;&nbsp;- <a href="https://twitter.com/albtweets">@albtweets</a></li> <li> &nbsp;&nbsp;- <a href="https://twitter.com/emeraldashborer">@emeraldashborer</a></li> <li> &nbsp;&nbsp;- <a href="https://twitter.com/foresthealth">@foresthealth</a></li> <li> &nbsp;&nbsp;- <a href="https://twitter.com/PlayCleanGo">@playcleango</a></li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Of course, there are a plethora of other websites with information on specific pests, regional issues, and other more specific concerns. But you have to start somewhere!</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/few-favorite-resources-firewood.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates don't move firewood favorites firewood information firewood resources Mon, 09 Dec 2013 18:56:50 +0000 L. Greenwood 1674 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Christmas tree season! http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/christmas-tree-season.html <p>Will you be using the upcoming holiday weekend to cut down your own fresh, local, Christmas tree? Or maybe buy one at a local nursery yard or hardware store? Great!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Just like firewood, our advice is to buy local, and/or buy from a reputable dealer. Christmas trees are actually a pretty well regulated product, so as long as you are buying from a licensed local business, your potential to accidentally spread pests is very low.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>We cover this topic every year, so here&#39;s an archive in case you want to delve deeper.</p> <ul> <li> All about <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/HolidayGreenery">Holiday Greenery</a>, including our catchy &quot;12 Tree Tips of Christmas&quot; (updated 11/2013)</li> <li> <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/resources/holiday-greenery-press-release">Buy Local, Buy Green press release for Holiday Greenery</a> (first released 2011)</li> <li> <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/christmas-trees-and-wreathes.html">Buying Christmas Trees and Wreathes</a> (2010 blog)</li> <li> <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/disposing-your-christmas-tree.html">Disposing of your Christmas tree</a> (2011 blog)</li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Happy Holiday Season!</p> <p><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/images/xmas_tree_image-smaller.png" style="width: 200px; height: 285px;" /></p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/christmas-tree-season.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates christmas tree cut your own tree holiday greenery thanksgiving weekend Mon, 25 Nov 2013 16:55:54 +0000 L. Greenwood 1673 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org When is it OK to move firewood? http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/when-can-i-move-firewood.html <p>There is nothing wrong with firewood itself- when done right, burning wood is a great way to heat your home, enjoy a campout, or make s&#39;mores. But if you move firewood, you risk moving invasive insects and diseases that could kill the very trees that shade and protect your favorite places... so when is it OK for individuals to move firewood? *</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>1. </strong><span dir="ltr" id=":1yn">Is your firewood packaged and heat treated, or is it just loose pieces of wood</span>?</p> <p>--- Loose pieces of wood: <em>read on to #2.</em></p> <p>--- Labeled and packaged heat treated firewood that says something like &quot;160F/75M&quot; (which means 160 degrees Fahrenheit for 75 minutes) is generally OK to take with you to a new place. There are a few rare exceptions, but basically <strong>commercially heat treated firewood is fine</strong>. Keep it in the original packaging whenever possible to avoid confusion.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>2.</strong> Are you crossing a town, county, state, or international line? Alternatively, are you just moving it very locally?</p> <p>--- Crossing any sort of jurisdictional line, including: international border, state line, county line, or even town line. This also includes entering state, federal, or private property (like a state park, national park, or private campground):<em> read on to #3.</em></p> <p>--- Very locally- like to your neighbor&#39;s place within a few miles, or across your own woodlot or property. <strong>Moving firewood very locally does not usually pose a significant risk.</strong> The practical limit is about 10 miles in densely populated areas, or up to 50 miles in larger landscapes. Always&nbsp;<a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/the-problem/state-state-information/index.html">consult local regulations</a> to be sure this is correct in your area.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>3.</strong> Can you figure out what the regulations on firewood and other untreated wood products are at both the source (where you cut or bought the wood) and the burn site (your house, cabin or campsite)?</p> <p>--- Yup, you looked it up and read the <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/the-problem/state-state-information/index.html">pertinent regulations</a> and you are confident this particular source-to-burn site for this type of wood is permissible. As long as you&#39;re moving it under 50 miles (or preferably much less) and you are sure you&#39;ve read and complied with the right regulations, <strong>it is OK to move firewood.</strong></p> <p>--- Nope, <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/the-problem/state-state-information/index.html">all those regulations</a> are making your head hurt, and you aren&#39;t really sure what&#39;s up. <strong>STOP. Don&#39;t do it. You need more information to determine if this is both legal and appropriate for the situation. </strong>Call your local state department of agriculture or forestry, or the pertinent park/campground authority. Or email us at <a href="mailto:info@dontmovefirewood.org">info@dontmovefirewood.org</a> and we&#39;ll do some legwork for you!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>* We&#39;ll cover businesses moving and selling firewood in a separate blog later.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Special thanks to Jennifer Forman Orth with the Massachusetts Dept. of Agricultural Resources for her assistance with this blog post. </em></p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/when-can-i-move-firewood.html#comments firewood regulation how to move firewood moving firewood when can I move firewood when is it OK to move firewood Firewood Mon, 18 Nov 2013 19:34:01 +0000 L. Greenwood 1671 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Moving Firewood from Massachusetts to Connecticut? http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/moving-firewood-massachusetts-connecticut.html <p>Tough one on the Dear Don&#39;t Move Firewood email hotline this weekend!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Dear Don&#39;t Move Firewood,</p> <p>We sell firewood in Massachusetts, very close to Connecticut state line. &nbsp;How far is too far to move firewood in MA and CT?&nbsp; ... We are only selling hardwood, no Pine, cut mostly in (Springfield area, MA).&nbsp; We currently have a request from (Windsor Locks area, CT).<em> (edited to combine correspondence)</em></p> <p>Yours,</p> <p>Firewood Seller in MA</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Dear Firewood Seller in MA,</p> <p>That&#39;s a tough one, because you crossing between two states with their own specific regulations. I got a little confused when I tried to figure out the exact answer, and ended up just calling the helpful folks at the <a href="http://www.ct.gov/caes/cwp/view.asp?a=2826&amp;Q=508926&amp;PM=1&amp;caesNav=|">Connecticut Agricultural Experimental Station </a>to get the facts. Turns out that due to the firewood being from out-of-state, you&#39;ll need a permit (specifically, <a href="http://www.ct.gov/caes/lib/caes/documents/eab/2013_eab_application_august_29,_2013.pdf">Connecticut Permit Application to Move Regulated Wood Articles</a>). The good news is that the Springfield area of MA is not currently under quarantine nor regulation for any major pests, so it is reasonable to guess that you will be granted a permit. And moving firewood from Springfield area to a customer in the Windsor Locks CT area is a pretty short distance- 20 miles or less - so there isn&#39;t a compelling reason to think this is a problem if the permit is granted.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Good luck, and thanks for asking!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>p.s. when in doubt, try consulting <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/the-problem/state-state-information/index.html">our map</a>! We do our best to keep up to date<a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/the-problem/state-state-information/index.html"> in all 50 states</a> and <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/the-problem/state-state-information/canada.html">Canada</a>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/moving-firewood-massachusetts-connecticut.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates Connecticut cord CT firewood firewood seller MA massachusetts Permit Application to Move Regulated Wood Articles Truck Mon, 18 Nov 2013 18:31:22 +0000 L. Greenwood 1670 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org From one part of Tennessee to the other? http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/one-part-tennessee-other.html <p>Dear Don&#39;t Move Firewood,</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>We have firewood from Estill Springs, TN and would like to transport it to Chattanooga to use in our fireplace. It is white oak and hickory. Thank you! <em>(editors note: edited to shorten)</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Yours,</p> <p>Fireplace User</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Dear Fireplace User,</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The state of Tennessee has several invasive forest pests and a couple different regulations at play, so I asked two local experts- Tim Phelps with the Tennessee Division of Forestry and Elizabeth Long from the University of Tennessee Extension Service - to give me formal opinions. Their quotes are below, but the super short version is this- Estill Springs to Chattanooga with oak and hickory is technically legal, but at that distance, it is really not a great idea.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>And here it is, first from Tim:</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&ldquo;Thank you so much for helping to protect our forests by trying not to spread pests. Your attention to the Don&rsquo;t Move Firewood message is very encouraging and we hope you&rsquo;ll continue to help spread the word, not the bugs.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The short answer to your question is that it would best to get your firewood from a more local source. The reality is that moving firewood from an infested hill to the other side moves it that much further. It is best to try to keep it within 10 miles; 50 miles is pushing it and that&rsquo;s about the distance you are looking at. That said, there are currently no state regulations for moving firewood out of Franklin Co. However, please note that if you were to move firewood from Franklin Co. into Hamilton Co., you would be restricted from transporting it back out. Hamilton Co. is currently under quarantine for Emerald Ash Borer, which kills ash trees, and buffer regulated for Thousand Cankers Disease, which kills walnut trees. Each restriction prohibits the transport of firewood outside the county line. More information on these and other forest pests of Tennessee can be found on <a href="http://protecttnforests.org/">ProtectTNForests.org</a>.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>And then from Elizabeth:</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&quot;Officially under the Thousand Cankers Disease State of Tennessee Quarantine, moving hardwood firewood from Franklin county to Hamilton county is not illegal.&nbsp; The Quarantine prevents the movement of potentially infested hardwood firewood from inside the Quarantine area to (hopefully) non-infested areas outside the Quarantine area.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>If the residents are absolutely sure that these trees are white oak and hickory, not black walnut, then there no risk of spreading TCD by moving the firewood as the insects and disease are primarily found infesting black walnut.&nbsp; The reason all hardwood firewood is regulated is that most people cannot tell hardwood tree species apart once the trees are cut into firewood.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>More information on TCD and the quarantine may be found at:&nbsp; <a href="http://www.tn.gov/agriculture/regulatory/tcd.shtml">http://www.tn.gov/agriculture/regulatory/tcd.shtml</a>&quot;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/one-part-tennessee-other.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates ask don't move firewood dear don't move firewood protecttnforests.org tennessee forest pests Tue, 12 Nov 2013 17:11:22 +0000 L. Greenwood 1668 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Halloween bug mask collection http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/halloween-bug-mask-collection.html <p>Viewed up close, the world of invasive insects is pretty amazing. Suddenly you see antennae that resemble <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/resources/walnut-twig-beetle-mask">golden cacti</a>- or <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/resources/gypsy-moth-masks">exuberant fluffy feathers</a>. Mouths used for chewing leaves and trees turn out to have <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/resources/asian-longhorned-beetle-mask">odd mustaches</a> or scary <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/resources/emerald-ash-borer-mask">brutal chompers</a>. Perfect for Halloween!</p> <p><a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/resources/gypsy-moth-masks"><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/images/GypMothumb.png" style="width: 77px; height: 100px;" /></a><a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/resources/goldspotted-oak-borer-mask"><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/images/gsobmaskthumb.png" style="width: 78px; height: 100px;" /></a><a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/resources/asian-longhorned-beetle-mask"><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/images/ALBmaskthumb(1).png" style="width: 77px; height: 100px;" /></a><a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/resources/walnut-twig-beetle-mask"><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/images/WTBthumb.png" style="width: 77px; height: 100px;" /></a><a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/resources/emerald-ash-borer-mask"><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/images/eabmaskthumb.png" style="width: 78px; height: 100px;" /></a></p> <p><em>(left to right: <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/resources/gypsy-moth-masks">gypsy moth</a>, <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/resources/goldspotted-oak-borer-mask">goldspotted oak borer</a>, <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/resources/asian-longhorned-beetle-mask">Asian longhorned beetle</a>, <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/resources/walnut-twig-beetle-mask">walnut twig beetle</a>, and <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/resources/emerald-ash-borer-mask">emerald ash borer</a>)</em></p> <p>Don&#39;t Move Firewood would like to introduce our new collection of ready-to-print invasive insect masks. Each mask comes with brief instructions and can be made using just string and crayons, or more ambitious mask artists can use (depending on the insect) suggestions of glitter, feathers, and yarn embellishments.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>These free masks are great for working with student groups, cub scouts, or anyone young at heart. We&#39;re introducing them for Halloween for fun, but they are appropriate for any firewood and invasive forest insect outreach all year round.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>To help you select a mask that applies well to the trees and issues where you live and work, below we&#39;ve <strong><em>suggested</em> just two each</strong> for of the USA&#39;s and Canada&#39;s basic regions. However, these are just suggestions, so feel free to look at <strong><a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/search/apachesolr_search/mask">all five insects</a></strong> if you&#39;d like. Enjoy!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Northeast, Mid Atlantic, and Eastern Canada</p> <ul> <li> <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/resources/emerald-ash-borer-mask">Emerald ash borer</a></li> <li> <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/resources/asian-longhorned-beetle-mask">Asian longhorned beetle</a></li> </ul> <p>Great Lakes and Central Canada</p> <ul> <li> <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/resources/asian-longhorned-beetle-mask">Asian longhorned beetle</a></li> <li> <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/resources/gypsy-moth-masks">Gypsy moth</a></li> </ul> <p>Midwestern and Great Plains</p> <ul> <li> <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/resources/emerald-ash-borer-mask">Emerald ash borer</a></li> <li> <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/resources/walnut-twig-beetle-mask">Walnut Twig Beetle</a></li> </ul> <p>Interior West</p> <ul> <li> <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/resources/emerald-ash-borer-mask">Emerald ash borer</a></li> <li> <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/resources/gypsy-moth-masks">Gypsy moth</a></li> </ul> <p>Southwest</p> <ul> <li> <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/resources/asian-longhorned-beetle-mask">Asian longhorned beetle</a></li> <li> <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/resources/goldspotted-oak-borer-mask">Goldspotted Oak Borer</a></li> </ul> <p>Pacific Northwest and Western Canada</p> <ul> <li> <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/resources/asian-longhorned-beetle-mask">Asian longhorned beetle</a></li> <li> <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/resources/gypsy-moth-masks">Gypsy moth</a></li> </ul> <p>Southeast</p> <ul> <li> <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/resources/emerald-ash-borer-mask">Emerald ash borer</a></li> <li> <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/resources/asian-longhorned-beetle-mask">Asian longhorned beetle</a></li> </ul> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/halloween-bug-mask-collection.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates beetle mask bug mask insect mask invasive insect mask Fri, 18 Oct 2013 20:09:16 +0000 L. Greenwood 1664 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org 2013 Firewood Education and Regulation roundup http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/2013-firewood-education-and-regulation-roundup.html <p>Congratulations to ourselves! Don&#39;t Move Firewood just finished its annual roundup of state based firewood regulations and educational campaigns, and wow, that file is a doozy. You can download the <a href="/sites/default/files/files/State firewood regulations_2013.xlsx">excel spreadsheet here</a>, or if you want a PDF (warning! <strong>many of the links do not work on the pdf</strong> <strong>version- </strong>but it does print out nicely) you can certainly <a href="/sites/default/files/files/State firewood regulations_2013.pdf">download that here</a>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>If you are just interested in looking up a specific state, please visit our <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/the-problem/state-state-information/index.html">State-by-State map page</a> and select the state you are looking for. We have updated all <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/the-problem/state-state-information/index.html">50 states</a> and <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/the-problem/state-state-information/canada.html">Canada</a>, accurate as of October 3rd 2013.</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/2013-firewood-education-and-regulation-roundup.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates Thu, 03 Oct 2013 21:37:17 +0000 L. Greenwood 1650 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Oak trees cut in New Jersey? http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/oak-trees-cut-new-jersey.html <p>Dear Don&#39;t Move Firewood,</p> <p>I live in NJ near the Asian Longhorn beetle problem... I was browsing on Craigslist for something and came across this guy trying to sell his oak trees in <em>(town)</em>, NJ. This got me worried and want to ensure it was OK for him to move this stuff all over the state but I can&#39;t find any info anywhere on how to check it out or who to alert that he is doing this. Is moving this wood OK?&nbsp;</p> <p>Yours,</p> <p>Concerned Citizen <em>(editor&#39;s note: question was edited for length)</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Dear Concerned Citizen,</p> <p>I&#39;m so glad you asked, because this is a common scenario. Someone cuts down trees and wants to get rid of the wood. What then? Well, for New Jersey, let&#39;s ask Carl Schulz, Director of the Division of Plant Industry for the New Jersey Department of Agriculture, for an official statement. Here&#39;s what Carl says:&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&quot;The State of New Jersey does not regulate the movement of firewood, now that the ALB quarantine has been rescinded, following our successful eradication campaign in partnership with the USDA APHIS Plant Protection and Quarantine program and the New Jersey Forest Service. &nbsp;&nbsp;The Department of Agriculture has an aggressive outreach project to strongly encourage consumers to buy their firewood locally, and to not transport firewood.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The National Park Service doesn&rsquo;t allow firewood to be brought into their campgrounds at Delaware Water Gap or Sandy Hook; the New Jersey Division of Parks &amp; Forestry discourages visitors from bringing firewood in their facilities - firewood can be purchased at most New Jersey State Parks with camping facilities; and the majority of private campgrounds in New Jersey do not allow firewood to be brought into their campgrounds and have firewood available for purchase.&quot;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>So the short answer is that while this oak wood should not be moved, it isn&#39;t regulated nor prohibited. It is just strongly suggested that they not move it very far. There would be nothing wrong with someone selling oak wood locally- perhaps a neighbor wants to use it as firewood, or a custom furniture maker in town wants the oak slabs for woodwork. That&#39;d be fine. But it is inadvisable to move it more than 50 miles maximum, ideally under 10 or 20.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Also, one final point of clarification for readers. While moving oak wood isn&#39;t a good idea because it could spread all sorts of pests that affect oak (potentially pests like oak wilt, sudden oak death, gypsy moth, others) the Asian longhorned beetle itself does not infest oaks. Plenty of pests do infest oaks, but ALB does not.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/oak-trees-cut-new-jersey.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates asian longhorned beetle new jersey oak oak trees oak wood Wed, 25 Sep 2013 17:36:08 +0000 L. Greenwood 1648 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Firewood Outreach Professionals Newsletter http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/firewood-outreach-professionals-newsletter.html <p>Did you know that Don&#39;t Move Firewood now publishes a monthly newsletter! That&#39;s right, we are the source of the Firewood Outreach Professionals Newsletter, which is managed as part of the Firewood Outreach Coordinating Initiative. We already have more than 300* subscribers and we&#39;re always looking for short, relevant stories that pertain to firewood and invasive forest pests.</p> <p>Four things for your information:</p> <p>&nbsp;- <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/receive-our-email-updates.html">Subscribe here</a> with this simple form</p> <p>&nbsp;- Read our <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/resources/foci-newsletter-2013-september-20">September 20th edition</a> for a quick example of what the content of our newsletter looks like</p> <p>-&nbsp; Run a search for all the <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/search/apachesolr_search/%20Firewood%20Outreach%20Professionals%20newsletter">archived newsletters</a> to date <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/search/apachesolr_search/%20Firewood%20Outreach%20Professionals%20newsletter">by clicking here</a></p> <p>&nbsp;- Send us a story to <a href="mailto:info@dontmovefirewood.org?subject=FOCI%20newsletter%20story&amp;body=Stories%20should%20be%20under%20200%20words%20and%20include%20at%20least%20one%20pertinent%20link">info@dontmovefirewood.org</a> for our next newsletter</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>* Subscribers go up every month- this number is accurate as of September 2013</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/firewood-outreach-professionals-newsletter.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates firewood outreach professionals newsletter FOCI newsletter Firewood Fri, 20 Sep 2013 17:44:17 +0000 L. Greenwood 1647 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Final crowdsourcing for our annual outreach roundup http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/final-crowdsourcing-our-annual-outreach-roundup.html <p>Every year, we gather all the information we can find on state-based firewood regulations and outreach and combine it into one giant spreadsheet. We&#39;re seeking final fact checking and edits on the 2013 version now! Please <a href="/sites/default/files/files/State firewood regulations_2013_v1(1).xlsx">download the current draft here </a>and then submit any corrections to <a href="mailto:LGreenwood@tnc.org">LGreenwood@tnc.org</a> as soon as you can! Final version will be released at the end of September. Thanks!</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/final-crowdsourcing-our-annual-outreach-roundup.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates Wed, 04 Sep 2013 19:08:25 +0000 L. Greenwood 1641 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Tree Check Month for Asian longhorned Beetle http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/tree-check-month-asian-longhorned-beetle.html <p>Did you know that August has been the first ever Tree Check Month? Yup- organized by the great folks over at USDA APHIS, Tree Check Month is an effort to get everyone to take ten minutes to look at their backyard trees, and look for pests or damage on those trees.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Want to participate? Here&#39;s a short list of resources if you want to check your trees for Asian longhorned beetle or other tree pests:</p> <ul> <li> <a href="http://asianlonghornedbeetle.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/GSALB-0238_One-Sheet_Update_k31.pdf">Tree Check Month</a> poster by USDA APHIS</li> <li> <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nIN4lmfuQnk">How to identify the Asian longhorned beetle</a> quick video from Outsmart Invasives</li> <li> <a href="http://blog.nature.org/conservancy/2013/07/29/how-to-save-countless-trees-in-10-minutes-or-less/">How to Save Countless Trees in 10 Minutes or less</a> blog post from The Nature Conservancy</li> </ul> <ul> <li> <a href="http://Asianlonghornedbeetle.com">Asianlonghornedbeetle.com</a> general website by USDA APHIS</li> <li> <a href="http://www.aphis.usda.gov/newsroom/2013/07/alb_tree_check_month.shtml">Tree Check Month </a>press release by USDA APHIS</li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>This weekend you should take a moment to go outside, take a look at your trees, and if you see any signs that they might be infested with Asian longhorned beetles, <a href="http://asianlonghornedbeetle.com/report-your-findings/">report it here!</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/tree-check-month-asian-longhorned-beetle.html#comments Pests in the News ALB asian longhorned beetle August is Tree Check Month tree check month Thu, 29 Aug 2013 17:14:34 +0000 L. Greenwood 1640 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Now booking for events in late October! http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/now-booking-events-late-october.html <p>Did you know our awesome Asian longhorned beetle costume is on tour? That&#39;s right, every year we lend our costume out to at least a dozen (often more) non-profits and state agencies when we don&#39;t need it. The costume lending season is from Labor Day through Memorial Day- essentially, the school year. Our costumes go to baseball games, parades, state fairs, TEDx talks, Landscaper conventions... you name it.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Here&#39;s how it works</p> <ul> <li> You email us at <a href="mailto:info@dontmovefirewood.org">info@dontmovefirewood.org</a></li> <li> Include the event dates, event name, the anticipated attendance, and where we can send you a rather large box</li> <li> You commit to sending it back to us, or to the next user, on your budget and PROMPTLY</li> <li> We send you a confirmation if it will be available, and then... you get to borrow it!</li> <li> You send us at least two or three high quality photos of you using the costume at your event</li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/images/BugFest 6 ALB David 1.jpg" style="width: 350px; height: 467px;" /></p> <p>In September and October our ALB costume is going to events in Vermont, Missouri, North Carolina, Ohio and Massachusetts. We are now booking for the weekend of October 19th and onwards. Send us a note if you want to borrow it!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Please note that right now we do not have an Emerald ash borer costume. We are working to remedy that problem ASAP. Thanks for your understanding!</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/now-booking-events-late-october.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates ALB costume asian longhorned beetle costume bug costume EAB costume emerald ash borer costume Tue, 27 Aug 2013 17:23:19 +0000 L. Greenwood 1639 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Mini Donuts and Big Beetles http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/mini-donuts-and-big-beetles.html <p>Don&#39;t Move Firewood rocks the Heath Fair</p> <p>by Annalena Barrett</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Last weekend Julia and I found ourselves frolicking around the fairgrounds of Heath, Massachusetts in our wondrous Asian Longhorned Beetle costume. The Heath Fair was a true country fair with contests for the best summer squash and most weight pulled by a lawn mower. This was very different from the music festivals and farmers markets we have gotten used to, and it actually ended up being one of my favorite events of the summer. This had a little to do with the fact that our booth was stationed next to the mini doughnut stand, and a lot to do with the conversations we had throughout the course of the weekend.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>There is a sweet spot in outreach in which we have new information to present to someone, and they are willing to listen and engage.</strong> Although speaking with someone who used to work for the Department of Conservation and Recreation who is an expert on invasives is a great interaction, that person probably already knows not to move firewood. At some events we experience the opposite, where people don&rsquo;t know about the issue, but also do not care to learn about it.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>It also helped that the Heath Fair had a lot of people in a really good mood, like this police officer.</p> <p><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/images/ALBgetsarrested.jpg" style="width: 350px; height: 318px;" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>At the Heath Fair it seemed like there were a lot of people who did not know much about Don&rsquo;t Move Firewood, but were excited to learn. Many of the people we spoke to spent a lot of time in the woods either for livelihood or for recreation, but it was clear that this demographic was concerned about saving their trees, which was great starting point for our conversations.</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/mini-donuts-and-big-beetles.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates asian long horned beetle asian longhorned beetle heath Thu, 22 Aug 2013 20:38:51 +0000 L. Greenwood 1638 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Five Years of Worcester, viewed by DMF http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/five-years-worcester-viewed-dmf.html <p>Field Trip to Worcester MA</p> <p>By Annalena Barrett</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Worcester Massachusetts is now in its fifth year of fighting the Asian longhorned beetle (ALB) and so far, they&rsquo;ve cut down about thirty thousand trees. One illustration of how the eradication efforts have been paying off in how many beetles are bring found. Last year, thirteen beetles were found, but only one has surfaced in 2013, at least so far. Recently, I had the privilege of taking a fieldtrip to Worcester with some representatives of the Department of Conservation and Recreation to see the work happening on the Asian longhorned beetle.</p> <p><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/images/worcestertree.jpg" style="width: 350px; height: 467px;" /></p> <p><em>(address removed from picture via digital editing)</em></p> <p>We arrived just a few days after that one beetle I just mentioned had been found and were actually able to get up close and personal with a living Asian longhorned beetle. In general, I like bugs and did not expect to be unsettled by this encounter, but let me tell you, this beetle was huge and creepy enough to make my hair stand on end.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>After this exciting but unpleasant encounter, we headed off clad in hardhats to see some tree removal. Everyone took turns using binoculars to try and spot the ALB damage signs in the upper branches of the trees, not the easiest task to be sure. From there, we got to see some tree surveyors in action a few blocks away. One person was upside-down in the tree looking at every inch of every branch, while another showed us what equipment, knots, and movements were needed to get into a tree and survey it.</p> <p><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/images/worcesterworkers.jpg" style="width: 350px; height: 263px;" /></p> <p>The rest of the day was spent walking through all the essential steps of the eradication program from the lot where the city&rsquo;s trees were brought to be chipped and rechipped to ensure it was no longer inhabitable by the ALB, all the way to the reforestation efforts. It was tremendous to see how hard people are working to get Worcester looking leafy and green again.</p> <p><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/images/worcesterchipper.jpg" style="width: 350px; height: 230px;" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/five-years-worcester-viewed-dmf.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates asian longhorned beetle field trip tree removals worcester Tue, 20 Aug 2013 22:11:13 +0000 L. Greenwood 1637 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org The LEAF interns visit Don't Move Firewood http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/leaf-interns-visit-dont-move-firewood.html <p><em>LEAF at Third Thursday in Pittsfield MA</em></p> <p><em>by Annalena Barrett</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Third Thursday is a monthly street festival that takes place in Pittsfield, Massachusetts. We picked a swelteringly hot day to attend, but luckily we had three fabulous LEAF interns and their mentor with us to keep the booth lively.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>What is a LEAF intern you ask?&nbsp; They are high school students participating in Leaders in Environmental Action for the Future (LEAF), a paid four-week internship program created by The Nature Conservancy.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/images/LEAF_intern.jpg" style="width: 350px; height: 263px;" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The three girls we got to work with had just come back from a two-week stint in Martha&rsquo;s Vineyard and would spend their last two weeks in Sheffield, Massachusetts getting to explore the Berkshires while working on various conservation projects. All three attend an environmental charter school in Boston, and reported that the past two weeks had been a pretty extreme change of pace from their usual urban setting.</p> <p>LEAF aims to reach out to populations that have become underrepresented in the conservation movement so that future generations will be stronger and more diverse. It was heartening to see juniors and seniors in high school already doing meaningful conservation work and leaping at the opportunity to sport and Asian Longhorned Beetle costume despite the ninety-degree weather. To learn more about the <a href="http://www.nature.org/about-us/careers/leaf/learn-more/index.htm">LEAF internship, click here</a>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The LEAF mentor, Ariana Kosmides, sent us this happy update from after the event! &quot;Cashe, Carenne and Aliyah loved handing out fans to help everyone combat the heat and giving Asian longhorn beetle tattoos to kids at the fair. It was a great opportunity for them to utilize their public speaking skills and peoples skills. Teaching others and answering questions about invasive beetles helped increase their knowledge and understanding of invasive species and the impact it has on our habitat.&quot; Thanks Ariana!</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/leaf-interns-visit-dont-move-firewood.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates LEAF intern LEAF internships that's what tree said Third Thursday Fri, 16 Aug 2013 18:38:14 +0000 L. Greenwood 1636 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org How about from Pennsylvania to New York? http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/how-about-pennsylvania-new-york.html <p>Our advice column is in high demand! Wow! Keep it coming.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Dear Don&#39;t Move Firewood,</em></p> <p><em>We are going camping twice in the next few weeks and would like to know if we can take our own firewood. We live in (northwestern) PA and will be going to (west central) NY and then also to (west central) PA. Could you tell us if we can transport our own wood, and in general, if and where can we ever transport wood? Thank you.</em></p> <p><em>Yours, </em></p> <p><em>Camper</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Dear Camper,</p> <p>You&#39;ve got three questions here, so let&#39;s do them each one at a time<em>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>1. Can you move firewood from your town in PA to your camping destination in NY?</em></p> <p>Nope, that&#39;d be illegal. New York prohibits the movement of untreated firewood from out of state, and also prohibits movement over 50 miles (your distance is more than that). You&#39;ll need to purchase wood near your NY camping area. Here&#39;s the pertinent link on that one; <a href="http://www.dec.ny.gov/animals/44008.html">http://www.dec.ny.gov/animals/44008.html</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>2. Can you move firewood from your town in PA to where you want to camp in PA?</em></p> <p>Your proposed trip is farther than 50 miles away, and the state agencies of PA strongly discourage moving firewood that far. From a strictly legal perspective, because you are not in a federally quarantined county, it is permissable. But it is not a great idea. Read more here: <a href="http://www.dcnr.state.pa.us/stateparks/thingstoknow/firewoodadvisory/">http://www.dcnr.state.pa.us/stateparks/thingstoknow/firewoodadvisory/ </a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>3. In general, where can you ever transport wood?</em></p> <p>This is a great question. If you are moving firewood a short distance (under 10 miles), and you are not in a quarantined area, and you are not crossing any major boundaries of states or counties, that&#39;s pretty much considered fine to do. For instance, if I cut up a tree in my backyard because it was too close to the house and I was worried it&#39;d blow over in a storm, and I wanted to take it across town to my uncles place (let&#39;s say its a 20 minute drive) because he has a wood burning stove, that&#39;s fine. Now- take note. If I was cutting that same tree down because it was killed by some unknown bug, and it was riddled with holes and woodpecker damage, I would NOT take it to my uncle&#39;s house, because I might spread whatever was in my tree to his property. Instead, I&#39;d burn it in my backyard fire pit whenever I wanted to roast some hot dogs.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Hope that helps!</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/how-about-pennsylvania-new-york.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates dear don't move firewood Emerald ash borer new york firewood regulations NY PA Tent Tue, 06 Aug 2013 17:27:05 +0000 L. Greenwood 1631 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org From Canada to the USA? http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/canada-usa.html <p><em>Dear Don&#39;t Move Firewood,</em></p> <p><em>I have broken pieces of 1x12 spruce that is kiln dried. It is used for building shelves, etc. It is not pressure treated, stained or painted. Can I bring it from Canada to the USA to burn as firewood?</em></p> <p><em>Yours,</em></p> <p><em>Firewood User</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Dear Firewood User,<br /> Your question initially had me stumped, because the regulations for border crossing depend on your direction of crossing, and also what type of wood you are bringing over the border. So let&#39;s review: you are going from Canada to the USA, so we need to know the US Customs and Border Protection regulation. And spruce is a &quot;softwood&quot; species (like pine).</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Here&#39;s your answer; it can be brought from Canada to the US if it is clearly labeled as per this excerpt from the <a href="https://help.cbp.gov/app/answers/detail/a_id/799/~/bringing-firewood-for-a-camping-trip">US Customs and Border Protection Firewood FAQ</a></p> <p><em>Softwood (such as spruce, pine, fir, etc.) firewood (non-commercial) must be accompanied by a treatment certificate or attached commercial treatment label&nbsp;declaring that the firewood was heat treated at 56 C (minimal core temperature) for 30 minutes and an&nbsp;inspection free from pest.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>There! So, if your 1x12 spruce has heat treatment stamps, or stapled on labels that indicate that it is kiln dried (both are possible) then you should probably be OK. But if your wood is entirely unlabeled, you stand a fair chance of having it confiscated at the border, which would be a waste of wood and you might be subject to fines. Now, I sort of doubt that your scrap wood is labeled, so even though kiln dried clean scrap that was stored inside is pretty darn safe firewood, you are still subject to the regulation as written... so it might be best to just use it on site and not try to bring it over the border.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Good luck, and I hope you enjoy your trip!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/canada-usa.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates bringing firewood over the canadian border dear don't move firewood firewood canada border firewood US border spruce firewood Forest Mon, 05 Aug 2013 16:10:55 +0000 L. Greenwood 1629 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org From Ohio to Michigan? http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/ohio-michigan.html <p><em>Dear Don&#39;t Move Firewood,</em></p> <p><em>We live in Michigan, and I have a co-worker who is cutting down a Maple tree in Ohio, right across the border. They are offering their firewood to us, is it ok to move firewood across the stateline between (edited to remove city names) approx. 17-20 miles? Both areas are quarantined.</em></p> <p><em>Thank you,</em></p> <p><em>Firewood User</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Dear Firewood User,</p> <p>Thanks for asking this important question. Michigan is indeed under quarantine for the emerald ash borer, and Ohio has two types of quarantines- a regional quarantine for the emerald ash borer, and an small area (far from your part of the state) under quarantine for Asian longhorned beetle. Because of this, I asked an expert, Sharon Lucik with the Emerald Ash Borer Program of USDA-APHIS, for some help. She replied, &quot;Not moving firewood long distances and making sure to purchase only treated firewood are two best practices to support healthy trees and forests. Given that, there are no emerald ash borer regulations prohibiting you from transporting firewood Ohio* to Michigan. Remember, untreated firewood can harbor invasive wood pests and diseases, so USDA continues to promote the &ldquo;Don&rsquo;t Move Firewood&rdquo; message as part of its public outreach and educational efforts.&quot;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>* Note that Sharon evaluated moving maple firewood from <u>your coworker&#39;s town in Ohio</u>, which is not a town that is under quarantine for <a href="http://asianlonghornedbeetle.com/where-is-it/ohio/">Asian longhorned beetle</a> (ALB). Maple, ash, birch and many other types of firewood ABSOLUTELY CANNOT be moved out of the <a href="http://asianlonghornedbeetle.com/where-is-it/ohio/">ALB quarantined areas of Ohio</a>. Speaking of the ALB, for anyone that is ever cutting down a maple tree, it is a really good idea to use that opportunity to look at the tree for signs of the Asian longhorned beetle. August will be the first ever <a href="http://asianlonghornedbeetle.com/get-involved/tree-check/">Tree Check Month</a>- so <a href="http://asianlonghornedbeetle.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/GSALB-0231_FactSheet_Redesign_k2.pdf">download this great one page handout</a> if you want to learn more about that!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/ohio-michigan.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates asian longhorned beetle firewood maple firewood michigan Ohio tree check month Fri, 26 Jul 2013 18:29:48 +0000 L. Greenwood 1615 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Moving 'fake log' firewood and pellets http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/moving-fake-log-firewood-and-pellets.html <p>The Dear Don&#39;t Move Firewood hotline is jumping this week! Thanks to everyone that writes in- keeps us nice and busy, and keeps all our readers thinking about firewood.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Dear Don&#39;t Move Firewood,</em></p> <p><em>Is it OK to bring my own Presto logs to burn?&nbsp; Or wood pellets?&nbsp; Both of these are distributed all over North America, often far from the place where they were made.</em></p> <p><em>Thanks,</em></p> <p><em>&#39;Fake Log&#39; Firewood User</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Dear FLFU,</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>It is OK! Not only is it OK, it is a great alternative to standard firewood. I can&#39;t say yes or no for any particular brand of &#39;fake log&#39; firewood (Presto being just one of many, many acceptable brands out there), but anything that has been finely chipped or pelletized, kiln dried, and then recompressed into logs is very safe to move. If you ever have any doubt about a quarantine or boundary that you need to cross with your processed firewood, <strong>don&#39;t unwrap or open the packaging until you arrive at your destination</strong> (so that it is abundantly obvious these aren&#39;t natural logs, and all marks of heat treatment and processing are easily seen in case of a problem).</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Personally, I would tend towards a fake log product that is compressed and made into a log shape without the use of glues and binding agents, just to minimize the potential chemicals that I might inhale once it is burned. There are lots of great products out there to choose from, so do a little shopping around to find one that seems best for you.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>For more on compressed and processed wood products and why we cannot endorse any particular brand or product, even though we think the product category as a whole is a great thing, please read our complete blog on that topic: <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/compressed-wood-fake-logs-pellets-and-more.html">Compressed wood, fake logs, pellets, and more</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/moving-fake-log-firewood-and-pellets.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates compressed wood log fake firewood fake log faux firewood pellet stove wood pellets Tent Thu, 25 Jul 2013 15:27:05 +0000 L. Greenwood 1613 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Wait, so what about pallets? http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/wait-so-what-about-pallets.html <p>One of the most perennial questions I get here at Don&#39;t Move Firewood is best described as the infinite variations of...can I burn pallets? move pallets? use pallet wood in my stove?</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Dear Don&#39;t Move Firewood,</em></p> <p><em>Is pallet wood okay to move?</em></p> <p><em>Thank you, Karen</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Here&#39;s the quick answer; <strong>not a good thing to do</strong>. Not often illegal, truly, but still something that I suggest not doing.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Why?</p> <p>&nbsp;- Pallets are sometimes impregnated with toxic and carcinogenic chemicals. <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/what-about-burning-cut-pallets.html">Particularly methyl bromide</a>. You don&#39;t want to burn that and then inhale it, or contaminate your wood stove.</p> <p>- Pallets are often stored outside for at least a few months, if not longer. That means nearly anything can crawl onto them and lay eggs (<a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/gallery-of-pests/european-gypsy-moth.html">gypsy moth</a>), or contaminated soil can stick or splash onto them (<a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/gallery-of-pests/sudden-oak-death-syndrome.html">sudden oak death</a>).</p> <p>- Pallets from other countries are now required to be heat treated, but some falsification of certificates and imperfectly applied treatment still occur. That means <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/pallet-firewood-pest-connection.html">new pallets could still contain pests within their wood</a>.</p> <p>- Campgrounds will sometimes confiscate cut pallets and construction waste as part of their own <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/construction-waste-firewood.html">facilities safety needs</a>. So even if you bring it, you might not get to use it.</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/wait-so-what-about-pallets.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates burn pallet can I burn pallet wood can I burn pallets can I move pallets pallet pallets Forest Wed, 24 Jul 2013 18:01:52 +0000 L. Greenwood 1612 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org DMF teams up with Outsmart http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/dmf-teams-outsmart.html <p>Teaming Up with the Outsmart Invasive Species Project</p> <p>By Julia Sullivan</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The Northampton Tuesday Farmers&rsquo; Market on July 9<sup>th</sup> was our fourth farmers&rsquo; market of the summer, but the first one to have an Outsmart Invasive Species Project specialist join our booth! The <a href="http://masswoods.net/outsmart">Outsmart Project</a> is a collaboration of individuals from UMass, the Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the Nature Conservancy working to stop the spread of non-native plants and insects that threaten the health of our environment. The Project has developed an awesome smartphone application that allows users to report invasive plant and insect species quickly and easily. It includes identification training videos and lots of other helpful information.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>This summer, the Outsmart Project is focusing on mapping the distribution of five plants: glossy buckthorn, Japanese knotweed, multiflora rose, autumn olive, and invasive honeysuckles. With such similar missions, Outsmart and Don&rsquo;t Move Firewood made a great team. Our table was brimming with both insect and plant samples, and the combination allowed us to convey the gravity of invasive species as a whole. In one case, an avid herbalist was drawn to the table because of the plant samples. He had a lot to talk about with our Outsmart representative, and we were able to provide him with some important information about the emerald ash borer and Asian longhorned beetle. Who better to keep an eye out for these insects than someone who frequently traipses through the woods!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>We had a great setup and spoke to swarms of people who were truly interested in what we had to say. There were kids constantly surrounding our prize wheel, begging to take more quizzes on the emerald ash borer and Asian longhorned beetle. We had some brave souls demand invasive insect tattoos on their cheeks, and we continued to surprise and impress people with our freebies. (I ran into someone rocking one of our Tree shirts yesterday at my brother&rsquo;s soccer game! Turns out she&rsquo;d won it on our prize wheel at the farmers&rsquo; market!) All in all, it was a great day.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>If you have an iPhone or Android: Download the FREE Outsmart Invasive Species application through <a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/outsmart-invasive-species/id499957573?mt=8">iTunes</a> or <a href="https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.bugwood.outsmart">Google Play</a>, and you&rsquo;ll be prepared to identify and report invasive species anytime. Check out <a href="https://www.facebook.com/pages/Outsmart-Invasive-Species/306996019341625">Outsmart&rsquo;s Facebook page</a>, or follow them on <a href="https://twitter.com/outsmartapp">Twitter @outsmartapp</a>!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/images/Northampton Tuesday Farmers' Market Image.jpg" style="width: 300px; height: 400px;" /></p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/dmf-teams-outsmart.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates northampton farmers market outsmart outsmart invasives summer interns Tue, 23 Jul 2013 17:15:05 +0000 L. Greenwood 1611 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org STOMPing in West Virginia http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/stomping-west-virginia.html <p><em>Guest blog by Cynthia Sandeno, Monongahela National Forest</em>, <em>West Virginia </em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Visitors coming from out of state to camp in West Virginia will notice an important message during their travels. New billboards proclaiming the message &ldquo;Don&rsquo;t Move Firewood&rdquo; have been established across the state in high-traffic locations to remind visitors to protect their favorite areas by buying firewood locally and using it locally.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/images/Discover Invasive Species Day 114_min.jpg" style="width: 350px; height: 233px;" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>In the fall of 2012, the <a href="http://www.phcwpma.org/">Potomac Highlands Cooperative Weed and Pest Management Area</a> (CWPMA) received funding to implement a large-scale project designed to inform travelers and citizen scientists about the steps they can take to prevent the introduction and spread of invasive pests.&nbsp; The project, &ldquo;Slowing the Onward Movement of Pests,&rdquo; also called STOMP, combines a number of outreach techniques including highway billboards, educational displays at visitor centers in state parks, forests and other locations, public service announcements, and training workshops.&nbsp; The CWPMA partnered with the &ldquo;Don&rsquo;t Move Firewood&rdquo; Campaign to design posters, billboards, and postcards to help spread this important message.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The Potomac Highlands CWPMA is a partnership of people, agencies, and organizations who have come together to combat non-native invasive species in the headwaters region of the South Branch of the Potomac River in West Virginia and Virginia.&nbsp; Working with the <a href="http://www.nature.org/ourinitiatives/regions/northamerica/unitedstates/westvirginia/index.htm">West Virginia Chapter of The Nature Conservancy</a>, the organization was assisted in their mission to spread the &ldquo;Don&rsquo;t Move Firewood&rdquo; message by the use of advertising space donated by Lamar Advertising Company. &nbsp;Lamar donated advertising space on four billboards in strategic locations to help increase travelers&rsquo; awareness that moving firewood can also move tree-killing insects and diseases.&nbsp;&nbsp; This generous donation allowed the CWPMA to reach visitors from neighboring states reminding them not to move firewood.&nbsp; &ldquo;We would have never been able to reach as many people without the generous donation from Lamar,&rdquo; said Andrea Brandon from TNC. &ldquo;Many people travel into West Virginia along these roads and will be reminded that they can make a difference.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>West Virginia is home to the <a href="http://www.fs.usda.gov/mnf">Monongahela National Forest</a> (MNF) which is located in the east-central part of the state.&nbsp; The Forest is the largest expanse of public land in the state, contains an estimated 52% of the publically available recreation land in West Virginia, and is the fourth largest National Forest in the 20 northeastern states.&nbsp; The Forest is located in proximity to major population centers of the region, including Washington, D.C., Baltimore, Philadelphia, and Pittsburgh making travel routes to the Forest high-risk locations for the introduction and spread of invasive species.&nbsp; The Monongahela is one of the founding partners of the CWPMA and has been leading the implementation of the STOMP project.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&ldquo;Being able to work with the many partners of the CWPMA has led to much greater success than we would be able to accomplish on our own,&rdquo; said Cynthia Sandeno, Ecologist on the Monongahela National Forest.&nbsp; &ldquo;Through the STOMP project, we are able to use private, state, and federal lands to help protect the health of West Virginia&rsquo;s forests by increasing awareness,&rdquo; said Cynthia.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The economy of West Virginia relies heavily on forest products, agriculture, and natural resource-based tourism; and is well known for its biological and cultural riches, recreational opportunities, and beauty.&nbsp; Invasive pests are a threat to all of these resources.&nbsp; The Asian longhorned beetle has not been found in West Virginia, but has been found just miles away in Bethel, Ohio making the travel routes between these two states high risk vectors for the spread of this species.&nbsp; &nbsp;If the Asian longhorned beetle becomes established in West Virginia, it has the potential to cause more damage than Dutch elm disease, chestnut blight, and the gypsy moth combined.&nbsp; Lamar Advertising donated two billboards near the routes entering West Virginia from Bethel, Ohio.</p> <p><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/images/WV_stomp_1.jpg" style="width: 350px; height: 467px;" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>In the coming months, the &ldquo;Don&rsquo;t Move Firewood&rdquo; message will also be spread to state parks and forests where educational displays will be installed to help reach even more people, including those that live in the state.&nbsp; &ldquo;We want to make sure that residents and visitors know that even moving firewood between counties within West Virginia could introduce harmful pests,&rdquo; said Andrea Brandon.&nbsp; &nbsp;&ldquo;By buying locally, campers can prevent unwanted pests from invading forests, fields, and waterways and causing environmental and economic damage.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The first &ldquo;Don&rsquo;t Move Firewood&rdquo; posters have been installed in campgrounds located at Nelson Rocks Outdoor Center, a climbing and zip lining facility that receives over 10,000 visitors annually.&nbsp; And, nine additional educational displays will be installed in August of 2013 in nature centers at state parks and forests that have received campers from Bethel Ohio.&nbsp; Without the help of the &ldquo;Don&rsquo;t Move Firewood&rdquo; Campaign and the assistance of manager Leigh Greenwood, West Virginia would not have been able to develop these important outreach tools.</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/stomping-west-virginia.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates Monongahela National Forest potomac highlands STOMP west virginia Mon, 15 Jul 2013 18:20:10 +0000 L. Greenwood 1608 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Four FAQs of the summer so far http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/four-faqs-summer-so-far.html <p>What are people asking the DMF summer interns?</p> <p>By Julia Sullivan</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Four events into our summer, Annalena and I have been continually impressed with the great questions we&rsquo;ve been receiving from festivalgoers and farmers&rsquo; market patrons. Our experience last week at the Lenox Farmers&rsquo; Market was no exception. Here&rsquo;s a sampling of four such questions that keep popping up.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What&rsquo;s the bug that&rsquo;s killing hemlocks?</strong></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>One pest that seems to be on a lot of people&rsquo;s minds is the <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/gallery-of-pests/hemlock-woolly-adelgid.html">hemlock woolly adelgid</a>. It was first reported in the 1920s and is currently distributed throughout the Eastern United States. Efforts to eradicate the hemlock woolly adelgid are currently under way via: biological control; lethal control using both chemical insecticides and, more recently, biocides; breeding resistant trees; managing the site to adapt to the loss of hemlocks. The fact that the insect continues to spread and hemlocks remain under threat, however, illustrates the great difficulty often encountered in responding to such invasions.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Is it okay to buy firewood at the grocery store?</strong></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Sometimes! This can be a really good option for some people, but only when it&rsquo;s done right. If you see bundles of firewood at the supermarket from an unknown source, be wary. Do not buy firewood from an unpermitted or unknown vendor that cannot tell you where their wood comes from. Buying wood that is labeled as heat-treated or kiln dried (to kill any pests within), however, is typically safe. And buying wood that is clearly labeled as being from the local area, if you are planning to use it locally, is also usually fine.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Doesn&rsquo;t the Asian longhorned beetle have predators that keep it in check?</strong></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>In its native areas (China and Korea), yes! Here, not so much. Native trees have defenses against the insects and diseases that they&#39;ve been living and evolving with for millions of years &ndash; not ones introduced from the other side of the world. Likewise, native predators eat native insects, and that keeps their populations in check. Invasive non-native insects and diseases have no effective predators in their new homes, and the trees have no natural defenses against them, allowing insects like the Asian longhorned beetle to reproduce rapidly and threaten the stability of the ecosystem. While native woodpeckers and other predators eat some Asian longhorned beetles, it is not nearly enough to keep their populations in check.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What are all those purple boxes?</strong></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The purple traps you might see suspended in trees are special boxes designed to attract the emerald ash borer. The triangular boxes release a scent similar to a sick ash tree, and the purple color is attractive to the beetle. They are intended to be monitoring devices that indicate the presence of beetles in a given area.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>NOTE: We have special non-sticky ones to show people at our booth. DO NOT touch the real ones you may see in trees- they are covered in seriously sticky adhesive that is very difficult to remove.</p> <p><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/images/purpletrapkid.jpg" style="width: 350px; height: 347px;" /></p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/four-faqs-summer-so-far.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates asian longhorned beetle FAQ firewood at grocery store hemlock woolly adelgid purple trap Mon, 08 Jul 2013 18:37:10 +0000 L. Greenwood 1595 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org First Farmer's Market with the DMF interns http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/first-farmers-market-dmf-interns.html <p><strong>Quiet morning at the Ashfield Farmers Market</strong></p> <p>by Annalena Barrett</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>After Clearwater and Solid Sound, Julia and I could hardly believe our eyes when we rolled up to the Ashfield Farmers Market last Saturday. About six tents had been set up with a few more on their way. No one seemed rushed or stressed, just happy to be outside on a sunny morning.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>People started milling around the market around 9:30am, taking their time and chatting with friends. It was so much more low-key than what we were used to, it honestly took some adjusting. Instead of shouting into throngs of humanity, we got to stand by our table as people meandered up to see what we were working on. It wasn&rsquo;t long before a group of kids were kicking around one of our beach balls and sporting awesome invasive beetle tattoos.</p> <p><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/images/Bug tatAshfieldFM.jpg" style="width: 350px; height: 415px;" /></p> <p>For the most part, people seemed more interested in learning about our cause than picking up some freebees. This made for a very pleasant morning, and by the time the market wound down, it really felt like we have engaged in some challenging and worth while conversations.</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/first-farmers-market-dmf-interns.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates ashfield farmers market bug tattoo farmers market that's what tree said Fri, 05 Jul 2013 15:39:23 +0000 L. Greenwood 1594 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Solid Sound Festival with the Don't Move Firewood team http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/solid-sound-festival-dont-move-firewood-team.html <p><strong>Solid Weekend at Solid Sound</strong></p> <p>By Julia Sullivan</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>With Clearwater&rsquo;s Great Hudson River Revival under our belts, Annalena and I felt like old pros by the time we rolled into MASS MoCA for a few hours of tabling last Friday. While we weren&rsquo;t lucky enough to snag a spot inside the actual Solid Sound Festival, we set up in some prime territory right beside the entrance.&nbsp; Needless to say, there was a lot of traffic. Hot, thirsty, sunburnt, and curious traffic. Lucky for these festivalgoers, we came fully prepared with hundreds of fans, water bottles, hats, and information. It was a wonderful weekend for stuff.</p> <p><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/images/SolidSound2013_2.jpg" style="width: 400px; height: 300px;" /></p> <p>Friday evening, before the afternoon heat subsided and the festival entrance guards stood down, we found ourselves before a line of hundreds of anxious, sweltering people. Our freebies were in high demand, and we could hardly keep up. While I ripped through boxes of fans and answered the common &ldquo;What&rsquo;s this all about?&rdquo; question, Annalena donned the Asian longhorned beetle costume, which made for some great entertainment for our captive audience. By the time we were ready to pack up for the day, we&rsquo;d already made a considerable dent in our supplies and gotten the word out about invasive insects.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The following day was long but productive. Without hundreds of festivalgoers held helplessly before us, we broke out the prize wheel to entice people. We continued to give out fans but made people do a little work to earn water bottles, frisbees, beach balls, DVDs, hats, and tree shirts. We let people read up on the Asian longhorned beetle and/or the emerald ash borer, tested their knowledge with a couple quiz questions, and eventually let them spin to win. And as always, our stickers and tattoos were a hit. It was awesome to see people milling about with creepy invasive insects all over their arms.</p> <p><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/images/SolidSound2013_1.jpg" style="width: 400px; height: 300px;" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>We gave away the last of our supplies on Sunday morning. Solid Sound cleaned us out of a truck&rsquo;s worth of stuff! What seemed a less than ideal location at first ended up working to our advantage, allowing us to interact with almost 700 people over the course of the weekend.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>While this festival was different in many ways from Clearwater, the array of heartening responses from the people we interacted with felt just as good. Whether we heard &ldquo;I remember you guys! I still have my frisbee from last year,&rdquo; &ldquo;Oh wow, good to know. I&rsquo;ll get firewood where I camp,&rdquo; or &ldquo;Yeah, I know all about this. I don&rsquo;t move firewood,&rdquo; our work this weekend served to both raise awareness and enforce what some people already knew. We&rsquo;re thankful for the awesome weather we&rsquo;ve had at both of our events so far and looking forward to what the rest of the summer brings!</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/solid-sound-festival-dont-move-firewood-team.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates don't move firewood interns don't move firewood summer MassMoCA solid sound festival Fri, 28 Jun 2013 18:29:56 +0000 L. Greenwood 1588 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org How to order your own bug tattoos http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/how-order-your-own-bug-tattoos.html <p>Here at Don&#39;t Move Firewood, we strive to supply any non-profit or local agency outreach professionals that come to us with supplies to aid in their own Don&#39;t Move Firewood outreach efforts. That includes things like our brochures, fake tattoos, stickers, water bottles, fans... you name it. So what&#39;s our most popular item?</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Fake tattoos! And we are running out of them right now because of unprecedently high demand</strong> (which is a good thing), so I thought it would be a great time to tell the world how you can order your own supply. First, do some comparison shopping to find a reputable online custom fake tattoo dealer. <strong>Try <a href="http://lmgtfy.com/?q=custom+fake+tattoos">this for a starting point</a> for bulk fake tattoos, </strong>or <a href="http://lmgtfy.com/?q=temporary+tattoo+paper"><strong>this</strong></a> if you just want to print a small amount of them on your own<strong> <a href="http://lmgtfy.com/?q=temporary+tattoo+paper">special tattoo printer paper</a>. </strong>We don&#39;t have a preferred vendor at this time, so you&#39;ll need to do your own research here.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Then, once you find one you think will work for you given your desired price point and quantity, browse our <strong>Don&#39;t Move Firewood Resource Library <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/search/apachesolr_search/tattoo">tattoo selection</a>. </strong>Once you determine which one you want, you can either download the PDF directly from those links, or email me at <a href="mailto:info@dontmovefirewood.org">info@dontmovefirewood.org</a> and I can send you a PNG file of the requested type.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/images/EABtat.png" style="width: 191px; height: 193px;" /></p> <p>Easy! Good luck!</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/how-order-your-own-bug-tattoos.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates ALB EAB how to get ALB tattoos how to get EAB tattoos how to order ALB tattoos how to order EAB tattoos how to order fake bug tattoos order fake bug tattoos Fri, 28 Jun 2013 16:04:54 +0000 L. Greenwood 1587 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Firewood without bark in Missouri http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/firewood-without-bark-missouri.html <p><em>Dear Don&#39;t Move Firewood,</em></p> <p><em>I live in Missouri and I camp often. Is it ok to use lumber without bark?</em></p> <p><em>Yours, </em></p> <p><em>Concerned Camper</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Dear Concerned Camper,</p> <p>What a deceptively complicated question- and a good one to ask. Lumber (I assume you mean cut firewood, not construction lumber here) without bark is indeed a bit less likely to contain bark dwelling insects, or insects that burrow between the bark and the heartwood (like emerald ash borer). But it is NOT safe 100%, and thus it often violates state or federal quarantines regardless of what part of the tree that an insect might prefer. Firewood without bark is <strong>not OK to transport </strong>from a practical, and often legal, perspective.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>I found this nice brochure on the specifics of <a href="http://extension.missouri.edu/emeraldashborer/pdf/FAQfirewood.pdf">emerald ash borer in Missouri</a>. From there, you can learn about one pest in Missouri- but there are others, like <a href="http://extension.missouri.edu/emeraldashborer/exotic.aspx#Thousand">thousand cankers disease</a>, that also spread on firewood (and in the heartwood, so de-barking doesn&#39;t help at all) and are also a big threat.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Verdict? Not a good idea. Please either keep firewood local, or buy it near your destination. Thanks for asking.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/firewood-without-bark-missouri.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates dear don't move firewood firewood without bark lumber without bark missouri MO Firewood Mon, 24 Jun 2013 17:32:06 +0000 L. Greenwood 1586 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Summer 2013 Kickoff- Clearwater! http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/summer-2013-kickoff-clearwater.html <p>Don&#39;t Move Firewood Summer Interns start off at Clearwater Great Hudson River Revival!</p> <p>By Annalena Barrett</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Last weekend Julia and I (the brand new Community Outreach Interns for the Don&rsquo;t Move Firewood Campaign) attended Clearwater&rsquo;s Great Hudson River Revival in Croton-on-Hudson, New York, an awesome environmental music festival. Neither of us had been to the festival before and had no idea what to expect. We set out Friday morning from Sheffield, Massachusetts and miraculously found our way there without a hitch despite our mutual ineptitude with directions. From there, the weekend was a total success. We were joined by two other Nature Conservancy employees based out of Albany and had a great time laughing at each other wearing the campaign&rsquo;s Asian Longhorned Beetle costume.</p> <p><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/images/Booth Shot.jpg" style="width: 400px; height: 300px;" /></p> <p>It was exciting to see how many people really wanted to engage with us and learn about invasive species and forest health. It was also heartening to hear how much people already knew. Several Clearwater veterans came up to the booth to say they remembered the booth from a few years back and still had their beetle ID cards tucked into their wallets. Or that they love to camp, but have learned to buy their firewood where they want to burn it. Over two days of tabling we spoke with about 900 people and administered almost as many beetle themed temporary tattoos. Needless to say, we worked some long days, but hearing someone exclaim, &ldquo;Wow I didn&rsquo;t know that, I&rsquo;ll definitely be more careful now!&rdquo; or watching a kid jump up and down as they explained to a parent how invasive beetles spread made it incredibly fun and worthwhile. Often, these issues seem out of hand and unmanageable, but after a weekend of reaching out and talking to folks about simple ways to protect our trees, it seems more and more likely that we will actually be able to get a handle on the situation by implementing best practices.</p> <p><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/images/Prize Wheel.jpg" style="width: 400px; height: 300px;" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>This sense of hope and progress was compounded by the overall environment of Clearwater. We were just one of many groups tabling in the expansive &ldquo;activist area&rdquo; of the festival. In addition to this, Clearwater had a Green Living Expo set up and a zero waste policy. Everything from the plates to the forks to the straws we used were compostable and there was a person stationed at every waste disposal area to help people sort their trash correctly. For a festival attended by thousands, this kind of commitment to minimizing waste is commendable. I can&rsquo;t help but lament a little that everywhere we set up a booth this summer will not be as conscientious and committed as Clearwater.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>At the end of the weekend, we had given away hundreds of fun freebees, learned that prize wheels make people of all ages excited, and deduced that there is no situation that is not greatly enhanced by fresh lemonade and a potato pancake.</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/summer-2013-kickoff-clearwater.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates don't move firewood don't move firewood summer campaign hudson clearwater summer interns that's what tree said Mon, 24 Jun 2013 16:48:17 +0000 L. Greenwood 1585 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Gathering firewood in Oregon? http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/gathering-firewood-oregon.html <p><em>Dear Don&#39;t Move Firewood,</em></p> <p><em>I know we shouldn&#39;t take firewood with us when we travel to camp. Could you help provide resources to let us know rules and regs. to collecting firewood in different areas?</em></p> <p><em>Thanks,</em></p> <p><em>Oregonian</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Dear Oregonian,</p> <p>The answer is very dependent on where you are going. In Oregon, there is no overall state law or regulation on collecting firewood, but different land managers (like private land, state lands, national parks or national forest) all may set their own independent rules. The best thing to do is spend a little bit of time on the internet, searching for where you are going and what the local rules might be. For instance, I poked around on the Forest Service <a href="http://www.fs.fed.us/recreation/map/state_list.shtml#O">National Forest listing for Oregon</a>, and found that (as one example) on the Umpqua they have a <a href="http://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/umpqua/passes-permits/?cid=fsbdev3_056188">nicely organized firewood page</a>. Most sites will have information on firewood in either a camping page, or a permits page, in my experience.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>In your neighboring states, i.e. see external links for <a href="http://www.invasivespecies.wa.gov/council_projects/firewood.shtml">Washington</a>, <a href="http://www.idl.idaho.gov/firewood/firewood-index.html">Idaho</a>, and <a href="http://firewood.ca.gov/">California</a>, the regulations will differ but the concept is the same. I&#39;m sorry it isn&#39;t easier to list all the exact resources!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/gathering-firewood-oregon.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates ask don't move firewood dear don't move firewood oregon umpqua national forest Mountain Wed, 19 Jun 2013 17:20:53 +0000 L. Greenwood 1580 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org All the ways we talk to you! http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/all-ways-we-talk-you.html <p>Did you know that Don&#39;t Move Firewood has a blog? Oh, wait, you are reading it. Just checking you are awake.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Aside from our blog, we also maintain a wide variety of online options for staying in touch. Here&#39;s a list in case you want to sign up, like, or follow us!</p> <p>- We are on Facebook at <a href="http://www.facebook.com/dontmovefirewood">facebook.com/dontmovefirewood</a></p> <p>- We tweet at <a href="http://www.twitter.com/dntmovefirewood">twitter.com/dntmovefirewood</a> (note that first O in Don&#39;t is missing on purpose)</p> <p>- We are trying to get the hang of <a href="https://plus.google.com/116650137381881269652/posts">Google+ </a></p> <p>- And we have a new newsletter! You can sign up for it via our <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/forms/contact-us.html">Contact Us page</a> (sign up on the bottom-right side), and read the first two newsletters here;</p> <p>--- <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/resources/foci-newsletter-2013-may-14">May 2013</a></p> <p>--- <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/resources/foci-newsletter-2013-april-17">April 2013</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Don&#39;t be a stranger- keep up with Don&#39;t Move Firewood!</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/all-ways-we-talk-you.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates blog don't move firewood firewood professionals newsletter FOCI newsletter twitter Thu, 30 May 2013 18:28:14 +0000 L. Greenwood 1577 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Springtime projects and leftover wood http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/springtime-projects-and-leftover-wood.html <p>As the days grow longer, you start to realize... wow, this deck is getting kind of old and rickety. Maybe I should do some outdoors renovations before the heat of summer comes on. And then...</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Dear Don&#39;t Move Firewood,</em></p> <p><em>Can you burn lumber? What about left over treated boards from building our deck?</em></p> <p><em>Yours,</em></p> <p><em>Deckbuilder Anonymous</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Dear Anonymous,</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Burning untreated, unpainted ends of new clean dimensional lumber (i.e. the last few inches that you trimmed off your pine 2&quot;x6&quot;s) is totally fine for home use, or backyard firepit use. So go ahead and burn it on site, on that same property, if you would like.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>However! Please take note that many <u>campgrounds</u> ban burning dimensional lumber scraps not because they are harmful in general, but because they are not easily distinguishable from construction scraps that might contain nails, staples, etc that could injure workers or visitors. Thus, even though it would be harmless from the sense of pests and pathogens to bring clean new lumber scraps for burning while camping, we do not advise doing that because you might have them confiscated anyways.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>But the other part of your statement worries me. It is never a good idea to burn &quot;left over treated boards.&quot; The chemicals used in the treatment of boards are, by definition, toxins. Burning toxin laded wood is a bad idea whether you are burning it inside or outside. Most treated wood contains chromium, copper, and arsenic. Chromium and arsenic are both extremely bad for you to inhale, especially while burning.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>All treated wood scraps should be disposed of in a solid waste facility, i.e. a landfill. Don&#39;t burn them!</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/springtime-projects-and-leftover-wood.html#comments burning lumber deck building lumber scraps treated lumber treated wood Forest Mon, 13 May 2013 19:49:46 +0000 L. Greenwood 1569 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org The pallet to firewood pest connection http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/pallet-firewood-pest-connection.html <p>At least 58 non-native wood-boring insect species have been detected in the United States since 1985; nearly all are suspected of having entered the country in crates, pallets, or other forms of packaging made of wood. And despite the far tighter regulations on wooden packaging that were put in place in 2006, some wood boring insects are bound to continue sneaking into North America.</p> <p>Since these insects live deep inside wood, they are difficult for people to detect. This means that importers and shipping companies have a tough time seeing if wood is contaminated, and just about anyone could unknowingly spread these pests within contaminated firewood.</p> <p>Two examples of the severe harm that this sort of pest can wreak are the <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/gallery-of-pests/asian-long-horned-beetle.html">Asian longhorned beetle</a> and <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/gallery-of-pests/emerald-ash-borer.html">emerald ash borer</a>. The Asian longhorned beetle (ALB) has been introduced to North America and Europe more than a dozen times via contaminated wood packaging from China. Most of these outbreaks were not discovered for many years &ndash; because even though this is a large insect, it spends most of the year hidden inside the heart of the tree.</p> <p>The U.S., Canadian, and European governments have spent close to $600 million dollars- and removed nearly 100,000 trees- in order to eradicate these outbreaks. Thankfully, these programs are succeeding: as of this writing, four of the seven North American ALB populations have been eradicated: Chicago IL; Long Island NY; Hudson County NJ; and Toronto, Canada.</p> <p>But three outbreaks remain &ndash; a fairly isolated infestation within New York City, the large infestation in Worcester, Massachusetts, and the newest found ALB infestation in Clermont County, Ohio. The infestations in Massachusetts and Ohio will be difficult to eradicate, but history has shown that it is possible if given the proper time and resources.</p> <p>The emerald ash borer apparently entered North America only once, according to genetic evidence and scientific analysis of infested trees . However, it has spread rapidly to an area of <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/presence-map.html">almost 200,000 square miles in 19 states</a>. So far, EAB has killed more than 50 million trees. After spending more than $300 million over 10 years, the U.S. and Canadian governments now leave efforts to states, cities, and homeowners. Towns and homeowners are now responsible for the costly (estimated at $1.2 billion per year) removal of dead and dying ash trees before they fall over, damage property, or injure people.</p> <p>It can feel so disheartening to read about these problems, but there are several concrete things that anyone can do that will really help.</p> <ul> <li> Don&rsquo;t move firewood- use only local or heat treated firewood when you go camping or traveling.</li> <li> Tell your friends, your coworkers, and your family about the issue of contaminated firewood.</li> <li> Educate yourself on how to spot the symptoms of pest infestations. Learn about <a href="http://asianlonghornedbeetle.com/spot-it/">ALB exit holes</a>, take a look at<a href="http://www.forestryimages.org/browse/detail.cfm?imgnum=1523074"> this picture of a nearly dead ash tree</a> with strange leafy sprouts near the base of the trunk (caused by EAB damage), and look around for <a href="http://www.forestryimages.org/browse/detail.cfm?imgnum=5471787">excessive or strange looking woodpecker damage </a>on individual trees.</li> <li> If you see a sickly or dying tree that you suspect might be infested by pests, report it to your state agricultural, natural resources, or forestry agency. Quick reporting can make the difference between a small infestation that is controlled quickly, or a huge infestation that causes the deaths of thousands of trees.</li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/pallet-firewood-pest-connection.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates ALB EAB ISPM 15 packaging pallets Bugs Wed, 01 May 2013 18:20:37 +0000 F. Campbell 1568 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Beetle time! http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/beetle-time.html <p>This weekend it was unseasonably warm at my house. Sunny, gorgeous, high around 65. We recently had an arborist cut down a few trees that were leaning hazardously towards our house, so there is a lot of firewood in our yard waiting to be neatly bucked and stacked. I was playing outside when it hit me.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Literally.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>A large beetle flew out of a log and smacked me in the shirt, hard. Being the head of Don&#39;t Move Firewood, I knew to immediately capture this beetle and stick it in a jar so I could look at it. Sure enough, it was a native beetle that had just emerged from the wood. The coolest part was that I could actually see fresh &#39;sawdust&#39; that the beetle had kicked out as it emerged from a neat little hole clearly visible between the bark and heartwood. Pretty fantastic to see that in action!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>On Monday, when I sat down in my office, I was going to tell you all about this, but then I got this email, and here&#39;s what happened next...</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Dear Don&#39;t Move Firewood,</em></p> <p><em>I bought a cord of wood from a local guy this past fall. I put the wood on my back deck on a metal firewood rack. The other day I saw a number of bugs on the left over wood.&nbsp; Someone told me they are longhorn beetles. Should I be concerned that they may end up in my deck or house? Should I move all the wood farther back on my property or just burn everything now?</em></p> <p><em>Thanks,</em></p> <p><em>Jack in Ohio</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>To keep a long story short, Jack and I corresponded a bit, and he ended up sending me a photo that quite clearly is not the Asian longhorned beetle.The antenna are far too short, and the stripes are very different from ALB. Also, even in Ohio, the last week of April is a pretty unlikely time for an ALB to be found outside because of their life cycle (much more likely in later May, or June or July).</p> <p><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/images/2013-04-23 18_20_22.jpg" style="width: 160px; height: 120px;" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>A happy ending. His local firewood (thank you!) doesn&#39;t have ALB in it! Win-win.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Of course, if you want more information on the ALB in Ohio, here you go:</p> <p><a href="http://asianlonghornedbeetle.com/where-is-it/ohio/">http://asianlonghornedbeetle.com/where-is-it/ohio/</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/beetle-time.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates alb lookalikes asian longhorned beetle beetle cut firewood firewood Ohio Tue, 30 Apr 2013 19:40:23 +0000 L. Greenwood 1567 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Preventing pest entry on plants http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/preventing-pest-entry-plants.html <p>We&rsquo;ve talked a lot here on Don&rsquo;t Move Firewood about how forest pests can enter North America on or in the wood of packaging materials, such as pallets. One thing that we talk less about is that many pests also have reached our shores on imports of living plants. Examples of this problem include the <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/gallery-of-pests/hemlock-woolly-adelgid.html">hemlock woolly adelgid</a>, winter moth, and the pathogen <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/gallery-of-pests/sudden-oak-death-syndrome.html">sudden oak death</a>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Until recently, the U.S. Department of Agriculture&rsquo;s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has tried to prevent new introductions by physically inspecting plant shipments. However, finding pests is very difficult because pests can be tiny, non-symptomatic at the time of import, or just simply very well hidden inside the plant. And of course it is unrealistic to inspect anything more than a minute percentage of total imports.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Protecting our forests and other natural resources for pests demands a more effective approach.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Recognizing this need, APHIS recently created a &ldquo;limbo&rdquo; category, known by its lengthy acronym NAPPRA (Not Authorized Pending Pest Risk Analysis). When certain types of plants from specific countries are deemed likely to harbor a particular pest, APHIS can temporarily prohibit imports of these plants via NAPPRA while it analyzes the pest risk and adopts safeguards to ensure that imported plants will be as pest-free as possible.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Last week, APHIS took the first action under this new authority<a href="https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2013/04/18/2013-09147/plants-for-planting-whose-importation-is-not-authorized-pending-pest-risk-analysis-notice-of"> by listing 107 plant genera</a> which are likely to transport one of 13 types of pests. For example, imports of birches, dogwoods, poplars, willows, and 70 other genera of trees and shrubs from Europe and much of Asia are prohibited because they could introduce to the U.S. the <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/gallery-of-pests/citrus-longhorned-beetle.html">citrus longhorned beetle</a> &ndash; a close relative of the <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/gallery-of-pests/asian-long-horned-beetle.html">Asian longhorned beetle</a> (ALB). Citrus longhorned beetles are able to attack an even greater variety of trees than the ALB. Both these large beetles spend months deep inside trees as larvae and thus are very difficult to discover via inspections.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Of course, many of the pests being prevented by these new actions could, if established, travel on contaminated firewood. Here at Don&rsquo;t Move Firewood we are excited that APHIS has begun applying their new NAPPRA authority to protect our forests. Exciting times!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/preventing-pest-entry-plants.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates asian longhorned beetle citrus longhorned beetle NAPPRA USDA APHIS Tue, 23 Apr 2013 18:34:54 +0000 F. Campbell 1564 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org The Asian gypsy moth problem http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/asian-gypsy-moth-problem.html <p>The <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/gallery-of-pests/asian-gypsy-moth.html-0">Asian gypsy moth</a> attacks many hardwood or deciduous trees as well as several conifers, including Douglas fir, hemlock, larch, pine, and spruce. Since the female Asian gypsy moths can fly &ndash; unlike the <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/gallery-of-pests/european-gypsy-moth.html">European gypsy moth</a> already widespread in the Northeast USA&ndash; it spreads more rapidly.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Asian gypsy moths are found in the Russian Far East, China, Korea, and Japan. Like all moths, they are attracted to lights &ndash; including lights at ports where ships are loaded. The females then lay their eggs on the ships.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>To protect our forests, U.S. and Canadian customs agencies inspect ships coming from northern Asia; ships found with moth eggs attached to the ship or its cargo must return to the open sea and clean off the eggs. Inspecting the ships is difficult, time-consuming, dangerous &ndash; and not always a perfect process - which leaves our forests vulnerable.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The U.S., Canada, and Mexico have adopted a <a href="http://www.nappo.org/en/data/files/download/PDF/RSPM33-10-08-09-e.pdf">&ldquo;regional standard&rdquo;</a> that makes China, Korea, and Japan responsible for ensuring that the ships travelling to North America are not carrying gypsy moth eggs. They must inspect the ships, monitor moth populations in ports and nearby forests, and take other actions to reduce the likelihood of moths laying eggs on the ships. For example, moths are not attracted to lights of a certain wavelength, so using those specific types of lighting reduces the risk while allowing port operations to continue.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>This program was applied to Russia in the mid-1990s. It has worked: few ships from Russia now carry gypsy moth eggs.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>China, Korea, and Japan are now gearing up their programs &ndash; but improvement is needed. In 2012, <a href="http://www.cbp.gov/xp/cgov/newsroom/news_releases/local/2013_nr/jan13/01302013_9.xml">31 ships with egg masses</a> were detected by U.S. Customs and Border Protection and required to leave port until they could pass inspection.</p> <p><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/images/shipinspection_0.jpg" style="width: 200px; height: 134px;" /></p> <p>Given how difficult it is to inspect ships, it would be easy for some egg masses to escape detection and hatch &ndash; starting another outbreak in North America. If it gets established, the Asian gypsy moth could easily be transported on firewood, just like the European gypsy moth. Remember &ndash; even if a pest outbreak has not been officially detected, the risk is still present.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/asian-gypsy-moth-problem.html#comments Outbreaks asian gypsy moth container shipping gypsy moth Tue, 09 Apr 2013 16:38:19 +0000 F. Campbell 1563 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Compressed wood, fake logs, pellets, and more http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/compressed-wood-fake-logs-pellets-and-more.html <p>Here at Don&#39;t Move Firewood, we get a lot of interesting ideas and news from our Contact Us page. Not infrequently, I get people that want to promote a legitimate product to replace conventional cut-wood firewood, something like a compressed sawdust log, or a pressed wood log, or pellets, or some other reclaimed wood product.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>For the record; as long as there are minimal or, ideally, no other products (glue, solvent, etc) and the wood source in the &quot;log&quot; is well-conceived (reclaimed, waste product, recycled sawdust, sustainably sourced scrap wood, small diameter thinned wood, fire salvage wood, whatever), we DO agree that your product is a viable replacement for the occasional firewood user. And if it is made from either heat treated material, or material processed into rather tiny bits, then we also agree it is safe to move long distances.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>However, we do not promote these items. There are two reasons for this;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>1) Don&#39;t Move Firewood is part of a non-profit. As such, we cannot confer gain upon a for-profit-entity. Bluntly, we can&#39;t promote your product because the government says that we can&#39;t, and we play by their rules.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>2) Firewood is, at its core, not the problem. The decentralized movement of firewood by individuals, sometimes going long distances, is the problem. Firewood replacement products, which are a very small part of the firewood market, are therefore not the answer.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>I think many of your products are great, and keep up the good work. But we can&#39;t promote them, and to say they solve the problem misses the bigger picture that free firewood is always going to be out there, and people are going to move it long distances if they are ignorant of the risks that entails.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>(this blog is mostly a reprint from our original 2011 blog on the same topic, seen here; <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/faux-firewood.html">http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/faux-firewood.html</a> )</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/compressed-wood-fake-logs-pellets-and-more.html#comments Pests in the News compressed firewood compressed log fake firewood faux firewood free firewood pellets Firewood Thu, 28 Mar 2013 18:28:12 +0000 L. Greenwood 1559 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Press Release: Look for Pests During Spring Garden and Backyard Cleanup http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/press-release-look-pests-during-spring-garden-and-backyard-cleanup.html <p><strong>NEWS RELEASE --- FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE</strong></p> <p>Contact: Sarah Volkman</p> <p><a href="mailto:svolkman@tnc.org">svolkman@tnc.org</a><br /> 215.622.0557</p> <p align="center">&nbsp;</p> <p align="center"><strong>BEWARE OF UNWANTED GARDEN AND TREE PESTS DURING SPRING CLEANUP</strong></p> <p align="center"><em>Tree-killing insects and diseases can be spread when disposing of yard waste</em></p> <p align="center">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>ARLINGTON, VA</strong>&mdash;March 20, 2013 &ndash; On the first day of spring, homeowners and gardeners nationwide are considering the annual task of cleaning up their yards and gardens to prepare for the growing season. This past winter has brought ample snow, rain and wind in most parts of the nation, knocking down more than the usual share of branches and even entire trees. Gardeners, landscapers, and anyone working outside this spring need to know that tree branches, firewood, and cleared brush can harbor invasive insects and diseases, making proper use or disposal critical to preventing the spread of tree-killing pests.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&ldquo;Even experts can&#39;t always detect a couple of pin-head size insect eggs or a few microscopic fungus spores hidden in wood; however, these tiny threats are enough to destroy an entire forest,&rdquo; said Leigh Greenwood, <em>Don&rsquo;t Move Firewood</em> campaign manager, The Nature Conservancy.&nbsp; &ldquo;Disposing of tree debris, brush, and other yard waste either on site or through municipal composting is the best way that homeowners can prevent spreading tree-killing pests as they clean up their yards and gardens this spring.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>More than 450 non-native forest insects and diseases are now established in the United States. While most can&#39;t move far on their own, many pests can hitchhike undetected on firewood and brush, starting new infestations in locations hundreds of miles away. These infestations can destroy forests, lower property values, and cost huge sums of money to control. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, estimates for damage costs in urban areas for just one invasive pest, the Asian longhorned beetle, range from $1.7 billion for nine selected cities to $669 billion for the entire United States.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Pest infestations can take years to be recognized by the authorities because sometimes trees appear healthy despite harboring harmful organisms. Many states have either regulations or quarantines relating to the movement of raw logs, unprocessed wood, or firewood. Depending on the types of problems present in a given state, these regulations might include cut firewood, raw logs under a certain length, high risk species of trees or brush, or other woody materials. &nbsp;Some of the invasive pests that have prompted both federal and state quarantines include the emerald ash borer, Asian longhorned beetle, gypsy moth, pine shoot beetle, sudden oak death, sirex wood wasp, and the hemlock woolly adelgid.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&ldquo;During the spring, people also can be on the lookout for signs of invasive pests as they work in their yards and gardens,&rdquo; said Greenwood.&nbsp; &ldquo;Symptoms might include unusual holes in trees, late or damaged leaf buds, or a pattern of dead tips on otherwise healthy branches. Although these insects and diseases can sometimes be difficult to detect, observant, concerned citizens are usually the ones who discover new infestations.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Tips for spring cleanup:</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <ul> <li> If you don&rsquo;t want to keep your firewood until next winter, don&rsquo;t be tempted to take it with you when camping this spring or summer. Instead, you can give it to your next-door neighbor, burn or chip it on site, or dispose of it locally.</li> <li> Hire a tree service or rent a tree chipper to shred fallen trees and branches and brush into mulch for your own garden beds and landscaping projects.</li> <li> Many areas now offer a yard waste recycling program. Contact your municipal solid waste management department for information specific to your area.</li> <li> If a yard waste recycling or composting program is not available, and you cannot keep it on site, brush, logs, and branches should be disposed of in a local landfill.</li> <li> Take care to respect all state and local regulations on the movement of firewood and other unprocessed wood &ndash; some areas are subject to serious fines for violations. For more information, visit <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/the-problem/state-state-information/index.html">http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/the-problem/state-state-information/index.html</a>.</li> <li> During your spring cleanup, if you notice an insect or tree disease you don&rsquo;t recognize, take a photo or obtain a specimen of it, and compare it to Web site photos of the suspected pest. A good resource to help in identification is: <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/gallery-of-pests">http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/gallery-of-pests</a>.</li> <li> If you believe you have found a new outbreak of an invasive insect or disease, contact your state department of agriculture: <a href="http://www.rma.usda.gov/other/stateag.html">http://www.rma.usda.gov/other/stateag.html</a>.</li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p align="center">###</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p align="center">&nbsp;</p> <p>To learn more about how to prevent forest pests from destroying forests, log onto <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org">www.dontmovefirewood.org</a>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The Nature Conservancy is&nbsp;a leading conservation organization working around the world to protect ecologically important lands and waters for nature and people.&nbsp;The Conservancy and its more than one million members have been responsible for the protection of more than&nbsp;18 million acres in the United States and have helped preserve more than&nbsp;117 million acres in Latin America, the Caribbean, Asia and the Pacific. Visit us on the Web at <a href="http://www.nature.org/">www.nature.org</a>.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/press-release-look-pests-during-spring-garden-and-backyard-cleanup.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates first day of spring news release press release spring cleaning spring cleanup Mountain Wed, 20 Mar 2013 18:06:18 +0000 L. Greenwood 1549 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Get ready for Pi Day! http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/get-ready-pi-day.html <p>Tomorrow is the quirky celebration of Pi day, known to geometry students world wide as &quot;that day when our teacher finally thinks it is smart to bring a delicious pie to school.&quot; In case you don&#39;t get the reference, Pi day is because of the amazing never ending number 3.14(etc) that is critical to calculating the dimensions of all circles and spheres. And tomorrow is 3/14.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Why are we mentioning Pi day? Well, here at Don&#39;t Move Firewood, we are working hard to protect your pies for generations to come.</p> <p>Like the traditional apple pie! Apple trees are under threat from many pests that move on firewood, including gypsy moth and of course the light brown apple moth.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>So have a piece of pie, while thinking about firewood. And remember, if you like nuts in your pie, you should <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/videos/im-worried-about-americas-nuts.html">watch this video.</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/get-ready-pi-day.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates apple pie apple trees maple trees pi day walnut trees Bugs Wed, 13 Mar 2013 18:13:44 +0000 L. Greenwood 1539 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org When all else fails, burn it http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/when-all-else-fails-burn-it.html <p>New question (OK, actually more like a statement) for Dear Don&#39;t Move Firewood!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Dear Don&#39;t Move Firewood,</em></p> <p><em>I have a tenant who brought ash firewood from Massachusetts to Connecticut without my prior knowledge and has stored the wood on the property within the structure. I am reporting this as I am concerned for both the home and other trees on my property.</em></p> <p><em>Yours, </em></p> <p><em>Worried in CT</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Dear Worried,</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>First, let me put your mind at ease in terms of the risk to your rental property&#39;s structure. The emerald ash borer does not infest standing structures like houses. It needs live flowing sap in the wood to survive and reproduce.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Now, to the meat of the issue. You have potentially EAB infested wood on your hands. Here&#39;s my advice. Burn it. <strong>Burn it all, burn it now, </strong>and let the renter know <em><strong>exactly why</strong></em> you are doing this. Be safe with your bonfire or fireplace, of course, but burn it soon. The adult EABs, if they are in there, could emerge as early as the end of April. So burn it before those bugs can crawl out! Make sure to get all little bark scraps and other debris and burn that too.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>If your renter brought the wood to your house from Berkshire County of Massachusetts, they have violated a quarantine and could be at risk for a major fine. The quarantine is in place because Berkshire county has a known infestation of EAB in the Pittsfield/Dalton area, and there could be other infestations in the area as well. If you feel reminding them of this quarantine will help them take you seriously to NEVER move firewood like this again, please feel free to kindly show them this informative link;</p> <p><a href="http://extension.umass.edu/landscape/news/emerald-ash-borer-quarantine-berkshire-county-begins-march-1">http://extension.umass.edu/landscape/news/emerald-ash-borer-quarantine-berkshire-county-begins-march-1</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>If you think you have found an EAB or signs and symptoms of EAB, please report it!</p> <p>Massachusetts: <a href="http://massnrc.org/pests/eabreport.htm">EAB reporting form </a></p> <p>Connecticut: <a href="http://www.ct.gov/deep/cwp/view.asp?a=2697&amp;q=464598&amp;deepNav_GID=1631%20#I">&quot;What should I be doing (about the EAB)&quot;</a></p> <p>List of <strong>all states</strong>: <a href="http://www.emeraldashborer.info/firewood.cfm#sthash.vhXPZmeq.dpbs">Emeraldashborer.info state by state page </a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Best of luck!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/when-all-else-fails-burn-it.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates berkshire county berkshire quarantine Connecticut Emerald ash borer massachusetts Tree Thu, 07 Mar 2013 20:29:54 +0000 L. Greenwood 1537 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Proper storm debris disposal is important http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/proper-storm-debris-disposal-important.html <p>Today&#39;s winter storms across the eastern seaboard will likely bring down trees across the region- falling onto powerlines, into backyards, and across roads. Here at Don&#39;t Move Firewood, we&#39;d like to remind you that once those trees are safely dealt with in the short term, there might be invasive pests in the remaining logs, branches, and even leaves for the long term.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Here are a few<strong> &quot;Do&#39;s&quot;</strong> for properly dealing with excess tree debris after a storm:</p> <p>- Cut, stack, and dry the wood for firewood on the site in which it fell. There is nothing wrong with using firewood for home heating or outdoor enjoyment as long as you use it near where it fell.</p> <p>- Inquire with your municipality if they will have a storm debris program, if you have too much to deal with on your own property. Sometimes there is free wood pickup by the city or county a few weeks after the immediate storm damage is dealt with.</p> <p>- Giving away firewood to a nearby neighbor is generous and does not represent a significant pest hazard. Consider sharing it <em><strong>locally</strong></em> only.</p> <p>- Treat all tree debris with care. Branches and leaves can also spread pests- never dump materials! Instead, use municipal services like large scale composting or landfills.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>And here are the &quot;<strong>Don&#39;ts</strong>&quot; for storm debris:</p> <p>- Of course, don&#39;t get anywhere near wood that might be in contact with electrical wires. Wait for the authorities to ensure your safety!</p> <p>- Don&#39;t later give away the wood at the side of the road. You might know not to move firewood- but not everybody does. Only share with <u>local acquaintances</u>.</p> <p>- Don&#39;t take the wood with you for any camping trips, or take it to your cabin in the woods. Don&#39;t move firewood!</p> <p>- Don&#39;t use tree care contractors without first checking out their credentials. Use the internet or call the city better business bureau to make sure they are in compliance with state and local wood disposal certifications.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Lastly, stay safe and warm, everyone.</p> <p><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/images/firewoodsnowy.jpg" style="width: 320px; height: 239px;" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/proper-storm-debris-disposal-important.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates fallen trees firewood march storm noreaster snow storm snow super storm snowquester storm debris Wed, 06 Mar 2013 16:29:55 +0000 L. Greenwood 1536 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org New house to old house? http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/new-house-old-house.html <p>The Dear Don&#39;t Move Firewood column that we post periodically is taken directly from emails that we receive here at the website. One letter that we got this weekend was so specific, however, that we can&#39;t really run it without compromising someone&#39;s identity. Intriguing, right?</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>I&#39;ll leave you hanging, but the substantial takeaway messages are the same as always.</p> <ul> <li> - Moving firewood 90 miles across a single state is too far, and not a good idea. Especially, of course, if the state has multiple quarantined counties for multiple pests.</li> <li> - If you find out someone has moved firewood that far, and you are able to kindly persuade them to immediately burn all the wood they moved, that is the best option.</li> <li> - When you are having trouble convincing someone that they should not move firewood, try finding someone they WILL listen to as backup. Maybe they have a friend that is a Master Gardener? Or can you find an article in the online archives of your local newspaper?</li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>And best of all, you can always submit your questions to us here at Don&#39;t Move Firewood for a neutral assessment of the situation. We are helpful, usually prompt, and pretty well versed in national and local regulations.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Good luck. Email us at info at dont move firewood dot org to submit your questions!</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/new-house-old-house.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates dear dont move firewood Emerald ash borer Forest Tue, 19 Feb 2013 19:31:07 +0000 L. Greenwood 1527 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Press Release: Look for tree pests during Great Backyard Bird Count http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/press-release-look-tree-pests-during-great-backyard-bird-count.html <p><strong>NEWS RELEASE --- For Immediate Release</strong></p> <p>Contact: Sarah Volkman, 215-622-0557<br /> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp; <a href="mailto:svolkman@tnc.org">svolkman@tnc.org</a></p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p align="center"><strong>BIRD WATCHERS URGED TO LOOK FOR SIGNS OF TREE PESTS DURING ANNUAL GREAT BACKYARD BIRD COUNT</strong></p> <p align="center">&nbsp;</p> <p align="center"><em>Looking for sickly or damaged trees and shrubs during the annual bird count can help preserve vital wildlife habitats</em>.</p> <p align="center">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Arlington, VA&mdash;</strong>February 15, 2013&mdash; This weekend, bird watchers worldwide participating in the 16th annual <a href="http://www.birdcount.org/">Great Backyard Bird Count</a> (GBBC), February 15-18, are encouraged to look for and report signs of tree pests like the emerald ash borer, Asian longhorned beetle, and many more. During the bird count, participants simply watch birds at any location for at least 15 minutes, tally the numbers of each species they see, and report their tallies online. While conducting these surveys, bird watchers are also encouraged to look at the birds&#39; habitats for signs of invasive insects and diseases.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&ldquo;The Great Backyard Bird Count is an ideal opportunity for bird watchers to check the trees for signs of invasive pests like Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB) and Emerald Ash Borer (EAB),&rdquo; said Jennifer Forman Orth, State Plant Pest Survey Coordinator at the Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources. &ldquo;The damage from these insects can easily be seen in winter, when there are no leaves on the trees, and birdwatchers are typically armed with a pair of binoculars that will help them check high-up branches for the perfectly round holes left by ALB in maples and other hardwoods, or the D-shaped exit holes and increased woodpecker activity associated with EAB infestations in ash trees.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Many of the forest pests and diseases that affect trees can be stopped or slowed if they are found and treated early enough by the proper authorities. The Nature Conservancy&rsquo;s Don&rsquo;t Move Firewood program works with USDA APHIS and many state agencies nationwide encouraging people to report all signs of potential forest pests.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&ldquo;Trees and forests are an essential part of our lives, and they provide shade and shelter, jobs and products, and clean air and water. From tree-lined neighborhood streets to national parks, we count on trees to provide benefits today and for generations to come,&rdquo; says Bill Toomey, Director of Forest Health Protection for The Nature Conservancy. &ldquo;That&rsquo;s why it&rsquo;s critical for everyone to be aware of the trees around them, and to report the signs of destructive tree pests to the proper authorities.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Participants in the Great Backyard Bird Count should report any suspicious damage or signs of forest pests as soon as they have concluded entering their bird data. Bird watchers are encouraged to take digital photos of any damage observed, identify the species of tree with the damage if possible, and then report findings using websites or state hotlines. Below is a sampling of websites for regionally and nationally important invasive forest pests.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <ul> <li> Asian longhorned beetle, <a href="http://www.beetlebusters.info">http://www.beetlebusters.info</a></li> <li> Emerald ash borer, <a href="http://www.emeraldashborer.info/call.cfm">http://www.emeraldashborer.info/call.cfm</a></li> <li> Thousand Cankers Disease of Walnut, <a href="http://thousandcankers.com">http://thousandcankers.com</a></li> <li> Gypsy Moth, <a href="http://www.hungrypests.com/YourMoveGypsyMothFree/">http://www.hungrypests.com/YourMoveGypsyMothFree/</a></li> <li> Goldspotted Oak Borer, <a href="http://www.gsob.org">http://www.gsob.org</a></li> <li> Sudden Oak Death, <a href="http://www.suddenoakdeath.org/">http://www.suddenoakdeath.org/</a></li> <li> Laurel Wilt, <a href="http://www.fs.fed.us/r8/foresthealth/laurelwilt/">http://www.fs.fed.us/r8/foresthealth/laurelwilt/</a></li> <li> For other pests of high interest to the United States Department of Agriculture, please look up the appropriate state on the map at <a href="http://www.hungrypests.com/">http://www.hungrypests.com/</a></li> </ul> <p align="center">###</p> <p align="center">&nbsp;</p> <p>To learn more about <em>Don&rsquo;t Move Firewood, </em>visit <a href="http://www.DontMoveFirewood.org">http://www.DontMoveFirewood.org</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The Nature Conservancy is&nbsp;a leading conservation organization working around the world to protect ecologically important lands and waters for nature and people.&nbsp;The Conservancy and its more than one million members have been responsible for the protection of more than&nbsp;18 million acres in the United States and have helped preserve more than&nbsp;117 million acres in Latin America, the Caribbean, Asia and the Pacific. Visit us on the Web at <a href="http://www.nature.org">www.nature.org</a>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/press-release-look-tree-pests-during-great-backyard-bird-count.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates asian longhorned beetle bird watchers birdwatchers Emerald ash borer great backyard bird count Mountain Fri, 15 Feb 2013 19:04:38 +0000 L. Greenwood 1526 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Cottonwood and Pecan to California http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/cottonwood-and-pecan-california.html <p>Let&#39;s finish up this week right with a question for our advice column, Dear Don&#39;t Move Firewood.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Dear Don&#39;t Move Firewood,</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Can I bring either or both Cottonwood and/or Pecan firewood into California from Arizona?&nbsp; I have relatives there&nbsp; and access to such wood.... I would be bringing the wood on the I-10 through the Blythe area. The Cottonwood would be coming from Globe, AZ and the Pecan from the Gilbert/Phoenix area. &nbsp;I&#39;m not sure which I would get, probably the Pecan as I think it may burn better?</em> (Ed. note: question lightly edited for clarity)</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Thanks,</em></p> <p><em>Jim from California</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Dear Jim,</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>I posed your question to the local expert, Don Owen from the Calif. Dept. of Forestry and Fire Protection. He&#39;s the chair of the California Firewood Task Force. Here&#39;s his response:</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>&quot;The CA Firewood Task Force does not recommend bringing firewood of any kind into the state unless it has been treated to eliminated pests.&nbsp; There is no quarantine that prevents the movement of this wood, but if it is infested with insects or other pests, the CA Agricultural Border Stations may confiscate and destroy it.</strong>&quot;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>My opinion, as the manager of Don&#39;t Move Firewood, is that moving cottonwood and pecan wood this far is really not a good idea and you shouldn&#39;t do it. Even if you lived in Blythe (which it looks like you live farther West into CA given your email, but setting that aside) you&#39;d be moving this wood over 240 miles- that&#39;s almost five times the very maximum recommended distance for moving firewood.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>There are many tree pests even in the arid areas of Arizona that you&#39;d risk transporting. Did you know that the goldspotted oak borer, which has killed tens of thousands of oaks in San Diego County, might have gotten there from firewood originating in Arizona? You&#39;d hate to be responsible for killing tens of thousands of California pecan trees, accidentally, if your wood had some previously unknown pests within it.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>So here&#39;s the bottom line- please don&#39;t move that firewood. Truthfully, it wouldn&#39;t be against the law to do it, but it isn&#39;t a good decision, and it may end up confiscated at the CA border anyway.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Thanks for asking!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/cottonwood-and-pecan-california.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates arizona AZ CA California cottonwood firewood goldspotted oak borer pecan wood Truck Fri, 01 Feb 2013 16:20:56 +0000 L. Greenwood 1524 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Losing your trees is bad for your health http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/losing-your-trees-bad-your-health.html <p>There is a <a href="http://www.fs.fed.us/pnw/news/2013/01/tree-human-health.shtml">new study</a> just released that shows there is a link between losing a lot of trees in your neighborhood and declining health of the residents in that area. It is a fascinating read, and it underscores the critical importance of not bringing in firewood from far away (which can start an infestation that then decimates the trees) and also<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pJCA0tpI91U"> reporting any odd pests or damage quickly</a>, so that you might lose one tree instead of all of them.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>One thing I think gets a little lost in some of the other reporting of this article is that the emerald ash borer really has nearly nothing to do with the big picture. The scientists used neighborhoods that had been infested with EAB not because there is something particularly dangerous or bad about EAB, but because it is a pest that kills a lot of trees in many places. This same study could have easily been done with neighborhoods affected by Dutch Elm Disease in the 1930&#39;s and 1940&#39;s, for instance (had the technology and information been there for the research, of course). Likewise, it is important to remember that control methods for EAB, ALB, and other insects and diseases remove trees from neighborhoods that <strong>are going to lose all their trees no matter what</strong>. It isn&#39;t like ignoring the pests and dead and dying trees results in less damage. In fact, the most direct result of<em> not </em>controlling pests is the loss of more trees over the long run.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/losing-your-trees-bad-your-health.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates city trees Emerald ash borer study urban forest Bugs Thu, 24 Jan 2013 16:17:16 +0000 L. Greenwood 1523 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Press Release: Trees, Pests and People on NETA ACCESS feed http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/press-release-trees-pests-and-people-neta-access-feed.html <p><strong>NEWS RELEASE --- For Immediate Release</strong></p> <p>Contact: Sarah Volkman, 215-622-0557<br /> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp; <a href="mailto:svolkman@tnc.org">svolkman@tnc.org</a></p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p align="center"><strong>NEW DOCUMENTARY ON TREE PESTS TO BE OFFERED TO NATIONAL EDUCATIONAL TELECOMMUNICATIONS ASSOCIATION MEMBERS</strong></p> <p align="center"><em>The documentary Trees, Pests &amp; People raises awareness of destructive tree-killing invasive pests </em></p> <p align="center">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Arlington, VA&mdash;</strong>January 10, 2013&mdash;The Nature Conservancy&rsquo;s new &nbsp;documentary, <em><a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/films/trees-pests-people.html">Trees, Pests &amp; People</a>, </em>will be offered as a National Educational Telecommunications Association (NETA) ACCESS feed for all 96 public broadcasting licensees in 43 states, the District of Columbia and the U.S. Virgin Islands on <strong>January 14<sup>th</sup> at 11am Eastern Standard Time</strong>. In this thirty minute documentary, the viewer meets concerned citizens and scientists from all around the country as they talk about their stake in tree health&mdash; with focus on what members of the public can do to help protect our forest resources.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&quot;Having <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/films/trees-pests-people.html"><em>Trees, Pests &amp; People</em></a> on the NETA ACCESS feed will allow this important film to reach PBS viewers nationwide,&quot; said Sarah Volkman, Communications Lead for The Nature Conservancy&#39;s Forest Health Program. &quot;We are very pleased to have our newest documentary included in the 2013 programming.&quot;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>From rural family businesses to urban residents, every person in North America is impacted directly or indirectly by invasive forest pests. <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/films/trees-pests-people.html"><em>Trees, Pests &amp; People</em></a> tells the story of how three different pests are affecting everyday lives in three separate regions of the country. In Missouri, the black walnut tree farms are threatened by the distant spread of thousand cankers disease, while in Florida the avocado growers are trying to slow the effects of newly arrived laurel wilt disease. In Baltimore, Maryland, the emerald ash borer is killing street trees while the city actively works to fight the problem &ndash; all the while realizing that the emerald ash borer has already killed millions of ash trees in 18 states.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Created in partnership with The Continental Dialogue on Non-Native Forest Insects and Diseases and the USDA APHIS, <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/films/trees-pests-people.html"><em>Trees, Pests &amp; People</em></a> illustrates the wide ranging effects that these threats have on our cities, small businesses, and natural landscapes. The film also provides tips on how to recognize and report these threats, showing how actions taken by everyday people can help prevent or minimize the loss of trees. <em>Trees, Pests &amp;</em> <em>People</em> is a story of how America&rsquo;s scientists, farmers, and city dwellers are all working together to keep trees healthy for decades to come.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&ldquo;Trees and forests are an essential part of our lives, and they provide shade and shelter, jobs and products, and clean air and water. From tree-lined neighborhood streets to national parks, we count on trees to provide benefits today and for generations to come,&rdquo; says Bill Toomey, Director of Forest Health Protection for The Nature Conservancy. &ldquo;That&rsquo;s why it&rsquo;s critical for everyone to be aware of what they can do to prevent the spread of destructive tree pests.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>A recent study by the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis at University of California, Santa Barbara estimated that local governments are spending $2 billion and homeowners $2.5 billion a year for tree removal and replacement, treatment of trees, and lost property value due to introduced non-native forest insects and diseases.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Over the last hundred years, introduced species of invasive insects and diseases have killed tens of millions of trees in forests, cities, and towns across the country. In addition to the emerald ash borer, thousand cankers disease, and laurel wilt featured in the movie <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/films/trees-pests-people.html"><em>Trees, Pests &amp; People</em></a>,&nbsp; there are many other tree-killing pests including Dutch elm disease, Asian longhorned beetle, Sirex woodwasp,&nbsp; hemlock woolly adelgid, sudden oak death, and others.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/films/trees-pests-people.html"><em>Trees, Pests &amp; People</em></a><em> </em>highlights how government, citizens, and corporations can close the pathways by which these tree-killing insects and diseases reach America and spread to new areas by working together. These actions can protect our wild and urban forests for the benefit of future generations.</p> <p align="center">###</p> <p align="center">&nbsp;</p> <p>To learn more about <em>Trees, Pests &amp; People</em>, visit <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/films/trees-pests-people.html">www.dontmovefirewood.org/films/trees-pests-people.html</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The Nature Conservancy is&nbsp;a leading conservation organization working around the world to protect ecologically important lands and waters for nature and people.&nbsp;The Conservancy and its more than one million members have been responsible for the protection of more than&nbsp;18 million acres in the United States and have helped preserve more than&nbsp;117 million acres in Latin America, the Caribbean, Asia and the Pacific. Visit us on the Web at <a href="http://www.nature.org">www.nature.org</a>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/images/TPnPlogo1.png" style="width: 300px; height: 155px;" /></p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/press-release-trees-pests-and-people-neta-access-feed.html#comments Pests in the News NETA NETA ACCESS trees pests and people Thu, 10 Jan 2013 21:23:50 +0000 L. Greenwood 1521 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org The other frequently asked questions http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/other-frequently-asked-questions.html <p>We have a list of <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/the-problem/firewood-faqs.html">Frequently Asked Questions</a> that addresses the perennial &quot;<a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/the-problem/firewood-faqs.html">how far is too far</a>?&quot; and a few other questions. But what about the other things people ask? Let&#39;s try to read your mind...</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Why didn&#39;t I hear about this 20 years ago? Seriously, is this a new problem, or what?</strong></p> <p>You can easily argue that accidentally moving pests on contaminated firewood has been a problem pretty much since the invention of the automobile. The first problematic invasive forest pests on record arrived in North America in the late 1800&#39;s, and some of them (like gypsy moth) move easily on firewood. However, the issue has only gained national traction since scientists and land managers reached a good understanding of the huge role that firewood has played in the spread of emerald ash borer (EAB). EAB was discovered in the USA in 2002, so in that regard the problem is indeed new to the public eye.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Who runs this website?</strong></p> <p><a href="http://www.nature.org">The Nature Conservancy</a> is the manager of the international Don&#39;t Move Firewood campaign, and operates this website on a day-to-day basis. We also have a <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/about.html">lot of partner organizations</a> that help us craft our overall strategies and messages on the website from time to time.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>How is this all funded?</strong></p> <p>Don&#39;t Move Firewood has a wide variety of funding groups, with the current largest being funds from USDA-APHIS. We are <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/funding.html">proud to list all our funding sources here.</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>I see that most of your blogs are written by L. Greenwood. Is that the same</strong> <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xf8hfZuzw_A&amp;feature=share&amp;list=PLF4CBBC5D8D386637">L. Greenwood as this</a>?</p> <p>Nope. Totally different L. Greenwood.</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/other-frequently-asked-questions.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates dont move firewood funding FAQ Truck Wed, 09 Jan 2013 20:41:42 +0000 L. Greenwood 1520 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org New house, new firewood http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/new-house-new-firewood.html <p>Excellent question for our advice column, Dear Don&#39;t Move Firewood...</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Dear Don&#39;t Move Firewood,</em></p> <p><em>Maybe I&#39;ve missed it on your site but I don&#39;t see any information on where to find firewood locally. We just bought a vacation home on Whidbey Island but so far I am not aware of a reputable firewood seller. Any information you have would be appreciated.</em></p> <p><em>Yours,</em></p> <p><em>Thoughtful Burner</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Dear Thoughtful,</p> <p>You didn&#39;t miss it- we actually don&#39;t have information on exactly where to find local firewood on our site. It&#39;d be nearly impossible to keep that sort of database up to date, and it&#39;d be completely impossible to verify each vendor. Sorry!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Instead, I will offer some advice. You have two options; commercially kiln-dried firewood, or bulk regular firewood. If you want kiln-dried wood (which given that your new house is in one of the rainiest parts of the country might be a good idea), then you can go to most large retailers and look around for a stamp on the package that says something like Heat Treated or Kiln Dried. Of course, this wood is more expensive than bulk regular firewood, so if you are planning to use wood fuel to exclusively heat your house, you need another option.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Untreated firewood straight from the forest or woodpile is lowest risk if it comes from a nearby source (ideally, under 10 miles). So a great way to find firewood is to ask around your neighborhood for where they buy wood- in this case, you&#39;d want to find a seller of wood that cuts and distributes it all within Whidbey Island. Looking at a map of your area, another option might be wood collected with permit on the West slope of Mt Baker National Forest. I don&#39;t think farther than that is a very good idea.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Good luck!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/new-house-new-firewood.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates firewood kiln dried firewood seattle washington state whidbey island Mountain Mon, 07 Jan 2013 20:48:36 +0000 L. Greenwood 1517 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Happy New Year! http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/happy-new-year.html <p>Are you celebrating the start of 2013 this weekend by doing some &quot;out with the old, in with the new&quot; kinda house cleaning, decoration disposal, and more? If so, please remember to read our tips (from a blog post last year) on <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/disposing-your-christmas-tree.html">how to get rid of old christmas trees and other tree decorations</a>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Alternatively, if you are planning on taking this first weekend of 2013 to go skiing, check out our second ski video, Ski Bro Talk Trees by Glen Plake!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="255" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/2O21Y3BrZn0?list=UUpGfbd7cJVncMwl4C7ovcQw" width="450"></iframe></p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/happy-new-year.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates christmas trees dispose christmas tree dispose decorations firewood glen plake mohawk skier ski video Fri, 04 Jan 2013 18:23:10 +0000 L. Greenwood 1516 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Thinking about skiing? http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/thinking-about-skiing.html <p>Are you excited for winter? We have two new videos out this month featuring the famous and amazing skier with a sweet mohawk, Glen Plake, and his love for trees. Check out the first of these two videos here and share it with your friends!</p> <p><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="255" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/EE6-8aQScjM" width="450"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/thinking-about-skiing.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates don't move firewood glen plake mohawk video Mon, 17 Dec 2012 17:45:49 +0000 L. Greenwood 1514 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Ash trees down the street http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/ash-trees-down-street.html <p>A reader question today regarding using wood from down the road.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Dear Don&#39;t Move Firewood,</em></p> <p><em>We have one ash tree in our yard. We also burn wood. We have a chance to get some wood down the street from us, but it is an ash tree and we don&#39;t know if the ash borer dies off at a time, hibernates, we just don&#39;t want to bring the borer to our house for our tree, but we need the wood to burn at our house. Can you help me? Thank You for your time in this matter.</em></p> <p><em>Yours,</em></p> <p><em>Rita</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Dear Rita,</p> <p>Using wood from a tree that is truly just from down the street- like under a mile or two- is not going to cause any problems, barring the unlikely chance the street itself directly crosses a regulated-to-unregulated county or state line. The emerald ash borer can fly a few miles on its own, so when we are talking very short distances like that, there is no harm to be done.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>You also have a really good question about whether the emerald ash borer &quot;dies off, hibernates...&quot; Indeed, like many pests, the emerald ash borer spends the winter in a dormant (like hibernating) state within the wood. So if you want to be super careful about your neighbor&#39;s ash wood that you are planning on burning- burn it first! Use their wood up in the midst of winter, when the pests are dormant in the wood, and any very small risks you were taking by moving the wood that short distance become even smaller risks.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Good luck and I&#39;m so glad I can help you find a safe source of wood to heat your home.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/ash-trees-down-street.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates ash trees Emerald ash borer firewood safe firewood woodstove Firewood Mon, 03 Dec 2012 17:41:26 +0000 L. Greenwood 1507 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Dying oak trees http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/dying-oak-trees.html <p>A reader question about their dying oaks, and what to do about it...</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Dear Don&#39;t Move Firewood,</em></p> <p><em>We&#39;ve had some oak trees die in our neighborhood this summer. I&#39;ve lost one and was wondering if there was something I could do, like maybe add something to the soil that might help.</em></p> <p><em>Thanks, </em></p> <p><em>Concerned Tree Owner</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Dear Concerned,</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>I&#39;m sorry to hear about your oaks. There are many things that could be affecting your oaks- some of them are environmental (like drought stress) and others are native pests (like two-lined chestnut borer) and lastly, it could be non-native pests (like goldspotted oak borer or Sudden oak death). However, without further information, I have no idea what might be the issue with your oaks.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>However, as we have said before, the most important thing after you have noticed something is wrong is to ask a professional for help. A certified arborist, a master gardener, or someone from the County Extension offices near you might be able to come over and give a diagnosis- or at least a really good guess- regarding what&#39;s up with your trees. In some cases, treatments could be reasonable and affordable. In other cases, the tree may not be saved. You won&#39;t know until you have a qualified opinion from someone that knows your area.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Good luck, and I hope you can save your other trees.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/dying-oak-trees.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates dear don't move firewood goldspotted oak borer oak trees oak wilt SOD Sudden Oak Death Tree Thu, 29 Nov 2012 16:09:06 +0000 L. Greenwood 1506 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Request for a firewood permit http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/request-firewood-permit.html <p>Over the Thanksgiving weekend, we got a request for a permit to move a cord of firewood across New England, through several states and over 160 miles. For one thing, we don&#39;t have the authority to give out permits. But more importantly- this isn&#39;t a good idea. New England has a wide variety of forest pests, many of which have only a few locations where they are infesting the trees. Moving firewood that far has the potential to make a new infestation- one literally right in your backyard.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>So, can you legally take a cord of wood from central Vermont, through New Hampshire, and then use it all winter in Southern Massachusetts, right near the Rhode Island border? Technically, yes, assuming you don&#39;t drive through the quarantined area around Worcester in central Massachusetts and put yourself in a position to accidentally violate the terms of the Asian longhorned beetle quarantine. But please don&#39;t move firewood that far. Even if you did burn it all by April, when insects and diseases in the wood could emerge, it simply isn&#39;t a smart move for the health of your trees and forests.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/request-firewood-permit.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates firewood firewood cord firewood permit massachusetts moving firewood New Hampshire vermont worcester quarantine Mon, 26 Nov 2012 18:55:22 +0000 L. Greenwood 1505 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Christmas Trees question time! http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/christmas-trees-question-time.html <p>It is that time of year again, when everyone starts emailing us here at Don&#39;t Move Firewood to ask the excellent, pertinent, logical question:</p> <p>BUT WHAT ABOUT CHRISTMAS TREES?</p> <p>Easy! Just like firewood- buy local, and/or buy from a reputable dealer. Christmas trees are actually a pretty well regulated product, so as long as you are buying from a licensed local business, your potential to accidentally spread pests is very low.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>For our full exposition on the topic, visit our page on <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/HolidayGreenery">Holiday Greenery</a>, or read previous blogs discussing <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/christmas-trees-and-wreathes.html">Buying Christmas Trees and Wreathes </a>or <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/disposing-your-christmas-tree.html">How to Dispose of Christmas Decorations</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Happy Holiday Season!</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/christmas-trees-question-time.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates christmas tree pests christmas trees holiday decorations Mon, 19 Nov 2012 19:49:45 +0000 L. Greenwood 1504 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Press Release: The Importance of Trees in Hurricane Sandy http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/press-release-importance-trees-hurricane-sandy.html <p>This just in! Don&#39;t Move Firewood&#39;s official press release for Superstorm Sandy in regards to tree health, safety, and awareness.</p> <p> <strong>The Importance of Trees in Hurricane Sandy: </strong></p> <p><strong>How to Keep our Trees Healthy and Resilient in the Aftermath</strong></p> <p> Hurricane Sandy took down countless trees along the East Coast this week&mdash;toppling onto cars and<br /> buildings, blocking roads, and tragically causing the deaths of at least a dozen people along the East<br /> Coast. In the aftermath of severe storms like this, trees get lots of attention and are pointed to as the<br /> cause of loss of power and damage to property. However, while some trees do come down in high wind<br /> and extreme weather events, the majority of healthy trees survive severe storms and slow down high<br /> winds while absorbing both excess rainfall and heavy storm waters.</p> <p> In the wake of major storms like Hurricane Sandy, it is extremely important to remember that moving<br /> storm debris, limbs, and downed trees over long distances can inadvertently spread tree-killing insects<br /> to new places. Many areas affected by Hurricane Sandy are under quarantines that specifically prohibit<br /> the movement of tree-based storm debris (including debris that has been cut into pieces of firewood).</p> <p> Nearly all the states affected by Hurricane Sandy have at least one quarantined county that regulates<br /> the movement of wood in order to minimize the spread of invasive tree pests such as Asian longhorned<br /> beetle and emerald ash borer. Storm debris from downed trees and branches should be disposed of using one<br /> of the following safer ways: brought to a local solid waste facility (i.e. landfill), set out for or brought to a<br /> licensed city composting facility, brought to a registered storm debris disposal yard, or used on site for<br /> firewood. Consult local newspapers and storm information to find out which of these options is best in<br /> your area.</p> <p> It is especially important to remember that trees planted near homes and roads need to be properly<br /> pruned to minimize potential damage and failure, especially near power lines. When planting new trees,<br /> it is helpful to select a species that will not grow too tall and interfere with power lines to minimize<br /> future damage. As cities look to replant choosing the right tree and putting the right tree in the right<br /> place will create a more sustainable&mdash;and storm resistant&mdash;landscape for years to come.</p> <p> Despite the damage trees can cause in extreme weather events, healthy trees in urban and suburban<br /> areas are important for a safer and cleaner urban infrastructure. Trees provide the many benefits to<br /> both people and wildlife in city settings:</p> <p> &bull; Improving water quality by minimizing erosion, slowing the flow of precipitation, and minimizing<br /> flooding during heavy rain events<br /> &bull; Mitigating climate change by removing carbon dioxide from the air, regulating local climate by<br /> lowering daily temperature variation, and reducing energy expenditure on heating and cooling<br /> &bull; Providing shade and improving local air quality by removing air pollutants and producing oxygen<br /> &bull; Creating valuable habitat for wildlife, and shade and a natural environment for city residents</p> <p> ###</p> <p> Learn more about The Right Tree in the Right Place at the Arbor Day Foundation</p> <p> <a href="http://www.arborday.org/trees/rightTreeAndPlace/" title="http://www.arborday.org/trees/rightTreeAndPlace/">http://www.arborday.org/trees/rightTreeAndPlace/</a></p> <p> To learn more about the issue of the movement of firewood, please visit<br /> <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org" title="www.dontmovefirewood.org">www.dontmovefirewood.org</a></p> <p> The Nature Conservancy is a leading conservation organization working around the world<br /> to protect ecologically important lands and waters for nature and people. The Conservancy<br /> and its more than one million members have been responsible for the protection of<br /> more than 18 million acres in the United States and have helped preserve more than 117<br /> million acres in Latin America, the Caribbean, Asia and the Pacific. Visit us on the Web at<br /> <a href="http://www.nature.org" title="www.nature.org">www.nature.org</a>.</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/press-release-importance-trees-hurricane-sandy.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates hurricane sandy trees storm damage trees storm debris superstorm sandy Fri, 02 Nov 2012 19:44:55 +0000 L. Greenwood 1503 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Apple and Oak to the Great Smoky Mountains? http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/apple-and-oak-great-smoky-mountains.html <p>Let&#39;s start off this Monday right with our occasional advice column, Dear Don&#39;t Move Firewood!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Dear Don&#39;t Move Firewood,</em></p> <p><em>Is it legal to move fruit wood (I.e., apple / plum) from non-quarantined counties to the <a href="http://www.nps.gov/grsm/planyourvisit/firewood-alert.htm">great smoky mtns</a>?&nbsp; Same question for oak.</em></p> <p><em>Yours, </em></p> <p><em>Mike</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Dear Mike,</p> <p>Excellent question, and a tough one. Apple, plum, and oak woods are all hardwoods, and therefore subject to many many quarantines around the country. If, indeed, you are moving wood from a completely non-quarantined county, it would probably be technically legal. However- the list of quarantined counties is vast (see here for a recent list <a href="http://www.nps.gov/grsm/planyourvisit/quarantine-counties.htm">http://www.nps.gov/grsm/planyourvisit/quarantine-counties.htm</a>).</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>More importantly, the list of quarantined counties does not include counties that have pests that are undiscovered- of course! </strong>And that right there is a reality. There are pests that can travel in apple, plum, and oak firewood that might be present, but not yet quarantined, in your area.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Therefore, here&#39;s our suggestion. If you live in a completely non-quarantined county, and are less than 50 miles from Great Smoky Mountains national park, it is very unlikely to cause harm to move your firewood, so that&#39;s OK. But if you are farther away, please play it safe. Use the wood at home, and buy or gather wood at the park.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Yours,</p> <p>Don&#39;t Move Firewood</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>P.S. Apple and Plum wood are great for smoked meat recipes. Maybe you could get creative and smoke a turkey for Thanksgiving? Keep the wood at home for a delicious treat.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/apple-and-oak-great-smoky-mountains.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates apple wood campfire firewood firewood quarantine great smoky mountains oak wood Tent Mon, 22 Oct 2012 15:07:38 +0000 L. Greenwood 1502 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org There's a sticker that says Go Ahead, Move Firewood http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/theres-sticker-says-go-ahead-move-firewood.html <p>Maybe you&#39;ve seen it- the bumper sticker that says, &quot;Go Ahead, Move Firewood. The bugs will get there eventually anyway.&quot; And you may be able to guess that here at Don&#39;t Move Firewood, we don&#39;t really appreciate that sentiment. Because while some bugs might get there eventually...</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Wait... what? Did we just say the bugs WILL get there eventually? OK, not exactly. This is complicated.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Let&#39;s take the case of European Gypsy Moth. In the 140 years since gypsy moth arrived, it has since infested roughly 1/4 of the country. The moth sadly does quite well in native North American forests, so the slow expansion of the edge of the gypsy moth territory is indeed inevitable.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>But in the case of a pest like the Asian longhorned beetle, they shouldn&#39;t and won&#39;t get there eventually. The Asian longhorned beetle moves slowly and doesn&#39;t fly far. Eradication of every ALB in all the known infestations is totally possible- if the right steps are taken, like not moving firewood and reporting all bug sightings.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>That&#39;s why we here at Don&#39;t Move Firewood strenously disagree with this bumper sticker- there are too many situations in which moving firewood is completely making the problem bigger, worse, and much more expensive.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>But wait! Let&#39;s look back at gypsy moth. Right now, the spread of this pest is curtailed by a slew of really effective programs, including trapping, local eradication, phermone releases (this keeps the moths from breeding so effectively), public education, and of course Don&#39;t Move Firewood efforts. These efforts will combine to protect 160 million acres of trees from death by moth over the next 20 years. That is a LOT of trees that will shade your street, homes, and natural places for another two decades if you live somewhere like Minnesota, Iowa, Illinois... states on the edge of the gypsy moth line.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Wouldn&#39;t you rather that gypsy moth takes another THREE HUNDRED years to reach the Pacific Ocean? Not a three day road trip in contaminated firewood, but rather three CENTURIES? That&#39;s the goal of Don&#39;t Move Firewood. We have hope that your actions, and the actions of your friends, will make a difference for today, tomorrow, and even hundreds of years.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><img alt="don't move firewood, it bugs me sticker for not moving firewood" src="/sites/default/files/images/itbugsme.jpg" style="width: 400px; height: 101px;" /><img alt="don't move firewood sticker that says that's what tree said don't move firewood" src="/sites/default/files/images/TWTSsticker.png" style="width: 195px; height: 195px;" /></p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/theres-sticker-says-go-ahead-move-firewood.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates asian longhorned beetle Emerald ash borer go ahead move firewood go ahead move firewood the bugs will get there eventually anyway gypsy moth the bugs will get there eventually anyway Tree Fri, 12 Oct 2012 18:23:22 +0000 L. Greenwood 1499 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Impressive new study released on insects in firewood http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/impressive-new-study-insects-firewood-released.html <p>All our favorite facebook, twitter, and email accounts are buzzing today with the news of the newly released scientific paper on live tree pests (both insects and other arthropods) that emerge from firewood. You can read an excellent short summary of the paper here, titled <a href="http://entsoc.org/press-releases/insects-found-nearly-50-retail-firewood">Insects Found in Nearly 50% of Retail Firewood</a>, or you can <a href="http://esa.publisher.ingentaconnect.com/content/esa/jee/2012/00000105/00000005/art00023">read the whole paper here</a> if you have a subscription.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The one highlight that really sticks out for me is that live insects emerged from 47% of the firewood bundles in the study. That means that half of the firewood could have served to create a new insect infestation.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>We&#39;ll report on this study more once we&#39;ve had a chance to read the whole thing!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/impressive-new-study-insects-firewood-released.html#comments Pests in the News firewood heat treated firewood insects in firewood scientific paper firewood study on firewood Mountain Tue, 09 Oct 2012 20:15:46 +0000 L. Greenwood 1498 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Stocking up for the winter ahead http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/stocking-winter-ahead.html <p>It&#39;s that time of year again! Leaves are starting to turn, mornings are getting cold, and frost is in the forecast. If you heat your home or cabin with a woodstove, it is probably time to stock up on a cord or two. Follow these quick tips to help minimize the potential threat this firewood could pose to the trees on your property.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>#1 - Know your state regulations before you call dealers. Check out <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/the-problem/state-state-information/index.html">our state map</a> for a good start in your area.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>#2 - Ask questions about the wood source before you buy it (or have it delivered). Where was it cut? Is that within your county? Ideally, it should be within 10 miles of where you will burn it, but up to 50 miles is still okay in some areas. Does it comply with your state&#39;s regulations (see question #1!)?</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>#3 - Store it away from your house, and don&#39;t stack it between two trees. Firewood up against an outside wall is both a fire hazard, and a potential structural pest issue (like termites). And a large tight stack firewood between two live trees stresses the trunks and can permanently damage their bark and roots. Make the pile on a rack, or freestanding, if you can.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Good luck, and stay warm!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/stocking-winter-ahead.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates firewood firewood cord firewood winter wood burning stove wood storage wood stove Firewood Thu, 27 Sep 2012 20:37:07 +0000 L. Greenwood 1497 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org BREAKING: Emerald ash borer found in Berkshire County MA http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/breaking-emerald-ash-borer-found-berkshire-county-ma.html <p>This just in! A press release from the Massachusetts Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs has announced an adult emerald ash borer was found on a purple trap in Dalton, Massachusetts. Please note that the author of this press release is NOT Don&#39;t Move Firewood, it is the Massachusetts Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs. The entirety of the release is below.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong><u>State Officials Confirm Emerald Ash Borer Detected in Massachusetts for First Time</u></strong></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Press Release Contacts:&nbsp; SJ Port &mdash; 617-626-1453 or <a href="mailto:sj.port@state.ma.us">sj.port@state.ma.us</a>; Krista Selmi &mdash; 617-626-1109 or <a href="mailto:krista.selmi@state.ma.us">krista.selmi@state.ma.us</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Boston &ndash; September 12, 2012 &ndash; Officials with the Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation (DCR) and the Department of Agricultural Resources (DAR) today announced that the Emerald ash borer (EAB) has been detected in Massachusetts. The destructive beetle was detected in the western Massachusetts town of Dalton on August 31, 2012, and was confirmed by federal officials on September 6. Massachusetts is the 18<sup>th</sup> state in the country to detect EAB.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>DCR and DAR officials are working together, in collaboration with the United States Department of Agriculture&rsquo;s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) and the USDA&rsquo;s United States Forest Service to take a number of swift proactive steps aimed at preventing the spread of the invasive beetle, including:</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <ul> <li> Defining a quarantine area that would only allow the movement of certain wood products under certain conditions.</li> <li> A de-limiting survey to help identify the extent of the infestation.</li> <li> Working with stakeholders to ensure they know how to properly treat or dispose of infested trees and materials.</li> <li> A survey with federal agencies to determine how long the area in which EAB has been present in our state, information which will help determine strategies in how to best address the threat.</li> <li> DCR will also maintain a ban that has been in place against bringing any firewood into state parks and forests.</li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&ldquo;The Emerald ash borer brings a very serious threat to our ash trees, and we are not taking its presence lightly,&rdquo; said DCR Commissioner Ed Lambert. &ldquo;We are taking swift action to address the infestation, and are working to mitigate any impact an infestation could bring.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&ldquo;Together with DCR, we are moving forward to develop and implement the best strategies to contain this invasive pest,&rdquo; said DAR Commissioner Greg Watson.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Regulated items that would fall under quarantine include the following:</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <ul> <li> The Emerald ash borer, in any living stage of development;</li> <li> Firewood of all hardwood species;</li> <li> Nursery stock of the genus (Ash);</li> <li> Green lumber of the genus (Ash);</li> <li> Other material living, dead, cut, or fallen, including logs, stumps, roots, branches, and composted and uncomposted chips of the genus (Ash);</li> <li> Any other article, product, or means of conveyance that an inspector determines presents a risk of spreading Emerald ash borer and notifies the person in possession of the article, product, or means of conveyance that it is subject to the restrictions of the regulations.</li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The EAB is a small, flying beetle, native to Asia. It was first discovered in North America in 2002, in the Detroit, Michigan area. Unlike other invasive beetles, the EAB can kill a tree fast, within just a few years, because it bores directly under the bark, where the tree&rsquo;s conductive system is. Since its discovery in North America, it has killed millions of ash trees and has caused billions of dollars in economic loss across the nation.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Ash is a main component of the Northern Hardwood forest in Massachusetts and is a common species in the Berkshires.&nbsp; Ash is also a common street tree in eastern Massachusetts.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Residents are urged to take the time to learn the signs of EAB tree damage and be sure to report any sightings.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <ul> <li> Look for tiny, D-shaped exit holes in the bark of ash trees, die-back in the upper third of the tree canopy, and sprouting of branches just below this dead area.</li> <li> The Emerald ash borer is a tiny, emerald-green metallic beetle, so small that seven of them could fit on the head of a penny.</li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>To report suspicious tree damage or insect sightings, or to learn more about this pest, visit <a href="http://www.massnrc.org/pests">www.massnrc.org/pests</a>. You can also call the toll free EAB hotline at 1-866-322-4512.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>More information about EAB: <a href="http://emeraldashborer.info" title="http://emeraldashborer.info">http://emeraldashborer.info</a></p> <p align="center">###</p> <p>Follow Secretary Sullivan on Twitter&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;..<a href="http://twitter.com/massEEA/">twitter.com/massEEA</a></p> <p>View videos on You Tube&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;.<a href="http://www.youtube.com/MassEEA">www.youtube.com/MassEEA</a></p> <p>View downloadable photographs on Flickr:................. <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/masseea/sets/">www.flickr.com/photos/masseea/sets/</a></p> <p>Visit the Energy Smarts blog:.................................... <a href="http://www.mass.gov/blog/energy">www.mass.gov/blog/energy</a></p> <p>Visit The Great Outdoors blog:&hellip;.&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;..<a href="http://www.mass.gov/blog/environment">www.mass.gov/blog/environment</a></p> <p>Visit our website:....................................................... <a href="http://www.mass.gov/eea">www.mass.gov/eea</a></p> <p style="margin-left:1.0in;">&nbsp;</p> <p align="center">100 Cambridge Street, Suite 900, Boston, MA 02114-2119 &mdash; (617) 626-1000 office / (617) 626 1181 (fax)</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/breaking-emerald-ash-borer-found-berkshire-county-ma.html#comments Outbreaks barney trap berkshires dalton Emerald ash borer massachusetts purple trap Bugs Wed, 12 Sep 2012 17:20:17 +0000 L. Greenwood 1486 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org That's not what Don't Move Firewood means http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/thats-not-what-dont-move-firewood-means.html <p>We got a confused email over the weekend here at Don&#39;t Move Firewood, claiming that our message is meant to discourage people from heating their homes with wood. Let us be very clear- this is not true! <strong>Don&#39;t Move Firewood is completely supportive of heating homes with wood, </strong>especially with high efficiency wood stoves and wood pellet stoves (as these are better for local air quality and heat efficiency). Don&#39;t Move Firewood also is completely OK with campfires at campgrounds and campsites whenever they are permitted, provided the wood is either harvested locally, collected on site, or heat treated (also called kiln dried) to kill any pests within.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>So let&#39;s review the Do&#39;s and Don&#39;t of Don&#39;t Move Firewood:</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>DO:</p> <p>- Burn wood in your wood stove or campfire if you want to</p> <p>- Adhere to all local restrictions on safe burning, such as fire restrictions due to this year&#39;s drought conditions</p> <p>- Buy wood that was cut locally whenever possible</p> <p>- Collect wood on site whenever legal- whether in your own woodlot, local national forest with permit, or while camping as permissable by local rules</p> <p>- Buy packaged wood that is certified heat treated or kiln dried to kill insects and diseases</p> <p>- Store firewood from your own trees on your own property when needed</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>DON&#39;T:</p> <p>- Don&#39;t take wood from your home to your campsite, or from campsite to home, if over 10 miles away</p> <p>- Don&#39;t buy wood from an unpermitted, unknown vendor that cannot tell you where their wood came from</p> <p>- Don&#39;t violate fire restrictions when camping- forest fires are dangerous for everyone, and the rules are no joke</p> <p>- Don&#39;t get cords of wood in preparation for wintertime from a vendor that isn&#39;t familar with state and local firewood regulations; bulk supplies of wood should certainly come from within 50 miles of your home or cabin, and best if under 10 miles</p> <p>- Don&#39;t mistake Don&#39;t Move Firewood for an organization trying to ruin your camping trip or prevent you from heating your home from natural sources. We are actually trying to keep insects from spreading to new places and killing your trees. That&#39;s our real goal.</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/thats-not-what-dont-move-firewood-means.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates firewood movement heating your home with firewood how far can I move firewood how far is too far firewood what does don't move firewood mean Firewood Mon, 10 Sep 2012 16:43:32 +0000 L. Greenwood 1481 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Help us learn about your state's efforts http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/help-us-learn-about-your-states-efforts.html <p>Here at Don&#39;t Move Firewood, we try to keep abreast of the latest information regarding federal and state regulations, as well as federal, state and non-profit group educational efforts, on the topic of firewood movement.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>To that end, we just put up a very tidy PDF of all state based efforts that we can find on the topic of firewood movement. But here&#39;s the problem; we know it must be wrong. There is so much out there we don&#39;t know about. And you can help! Download<a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/resources/state-regulations-and-education-summary"> the pdf on this page</a>, and tell us what you think. Is there something in your state, or another state, that you think is inaccurate? Email <a href="mailto:info@dontmovefirewood.org">info@dontmovefirewood.org</a> with a better URL or description, and we&#39;ll put it all together into a cleaner version by the end of September.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Help us help you!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/help-us-learn-about-your-states-efforts.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates firewood outreach firewood regulations firewood summary Truck Thu, 30 Aug 2012 18:12:04 +0000 L. Greenwood 1467 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org A beautiful evening with Tanglewood on Parade http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/beautiful-evening-tanglewood-parade.html <p>Branching out on the Lawn at Tanglewood</p> <p>by Sean Mahoney</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>While it may seem a deviation from our regular amped up musical taste of banjo and &ldquo;bumping bass&rdquo; (I must credit Natalie for introducing me to that phrase) the Don&rsquo;t Move Firewood crew found ourselves fitting right in with the picnickers streaming onto the lawn in Lenox for the 66<sup>th</sup> Tanglewood on Parade.</p> <p><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/images/tanglewood_sean.jpg" style="width: 400px; height: 267px;" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The weather was perfect for the occasion. Not a menacing cloud was above us as the soothing sounds of string quartets made their way from the garden.&nbsp; What a relaxing respite from a long summer on the road! I recommend to anyone traveling through the Berkshires to spend at least one night out on the lawn watching the night creep in over Stockbridge Bowl and experience what Tanglewood is all about.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/images/tangelwood_picnic.jpg" style="width: 400px; height: 249px;" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>In the spirit of Tanglewood I have included a small artistic expression of my emotions for such a wonderful place. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p align="center">Warm Soft Grass</p> <p align="center">Rolling Hills Afar</p> <p align="center">Summer Wind</p> <p align="center">&nbsp;</p> <p align="center">Woodwind Light</p> <p align="center">Maestro Conducts by Sight</p> <p align="center">Starry Cool Night</p> <p align="center">&nbsp;</p> <p align="center">Candles Sleep</p> <p align="center">Notes Move Away</p> <p align="center">&nbsp;Slumber Taunts</p> <p align="center">&nbsp;</p> <p>If you are curious to read more about how the Boston Symphony Orchestra made its summer home in the Berkshires <a href="http://www.bso.org/brands/tanglewood/about-us/historyarchives/the-history-of-tanglewood.aspx?sa=t&amp;rct=j&amp;q=&amp;esrc=s&amp;source=web&amp;cd=1&amp;ved=0CGAQFjAA&amp;url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.bso.org%2FHome%2FBranding%3Fbrand%3D6427%26linkForward%3D6685&amp;ei=rzMlUJCWHYTY8gSfkYCIDA&amp;usg=AFQjCNGLogHahAtEKFrPeNGOST7vYoXBtg&amp;sig2=Yvv0o-ZeY-AXTMTtbymFIQ">please click here. </a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>See you on the lawn with your Don&rsquo;t Move Firewood fan in hand!</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/beautiful-evening-tanglewood-parade.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates sean mahoney tanglewood tanglewood on parade Thu, 23 Aug 2012 18:00:14 +0000 L. Greenwood 1463 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Oh, the places we go! http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/oh-places-we-go.html <p>The Don&rsquo;t Move Firewood &nbsp;trip to the Newport Folk Festival can only be described by one word: Adventure.</p> <p>by Natalie Garcia</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The weather for the weekend called for rain. Fortunately all of day one, Poseidon was a fan of all the awesome music that was playing and decided to keep the rain away. We got the weekend started off right, and I was really excited by how many people we were able to talk to &mdash; more than 1,000 total! I was prize wheeling like it&rsquo;s my job (wait, maybe that&rsquo;s because it is?).</p> <p><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/images/newportnatalie.jpg" style="width: 400px; height: 267px;" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>It was great to see the enthusiasm in people that knew about the firewood issue, and even more awesome to talk to new people that hadn&rsquo;t heard about us, promised to let others know, and to not move their firewood anymore. One funny thing about the Newporters was that they kept telling us that handing out Frisbees was &ldquo;against the rules&rdquo; &ndash; who knew that all of these hipsters were such goodie two shoes?</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Then of course, when it was time for us to pack up for the night, the heavens opened above Fort Adams State Park and the whole place was soaked. Great.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>How were we and the 10,000 other people going to make it out of this Fort dry? The answer was, VERY SLOWLY. After the first sound of thunder, it was pretty much a mass exodus out of there, and since we were parked in the very back we were very stuck. It took us 1 hour of waiting - reading in our car - and one hour of traffic &ndash; watching a movie and getting a treat from happy festival streakers. Yup. Two gentlemen decided to let everyone stuck in traffic have a much needed giggle.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/images/LakeChargogg.jpg" style="width: 400px; height: 310px;" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Then somehow on our return trip, Google maps decided to send us through Connecticut without me knowing. Basically I got us lost, and I had to navigate us to back to the Mass Turnpike. There was a silver lining to this detour, the Dirt Store and Lake Chargoggagoggmanchaug&hellip; two incredibly bizarre and random things we spotted on our short (de)tour of New England.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/oh-places-we-go.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates don't move firewood summer outreach newport folk festival rhode island summer don't move firewood interns Wed, 22 Aug 2012 19:43:14 +0000 L. Greenwood 1462 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org New signs in Massachusetts say Stop Invasive Pests, Keep Firewood Local http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/new-signs-massachusetts-say-stop-invasive-pests-keep-firewood-local.html <p>If you&#39;ve been driving through Massachusetts lately, you may have seen electronic signs on the highway saying &quot;<span dir="ltr" id=":79">Stop Invasive Pests. Keep Firewood Local.&quot; Are you wondering what is up? Well, we&#39;re here to help. When you keep firewood local, you are helping prevent the spread of unwanted invasive pests that can hitchhike on contaminated firewood. Pests like the Asian longhorned beetle, emerald ash borer, and </span>gypsy moth kill your trees and cause serious damage to natural forests and landscapes.</p> <p><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/images/dmfhighway.jpg" style="width: 400px; height: 261px;" /></p> <p>Don&#39;t Move Firewood is a campaign to spread the word about this problem. We&#39;re excited about the Massachusetts highways signs, and hope that you&#39;ve come to our site because you saw one. To learn more about the firewood issue, please cruise this website. If you want to help us educate your friends and family, please friend us on facebook at <a href="http://www.facebook.com/dontmovefirewood">facebook.com/dontmovefirewood </a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Thanks for visiting, and drive safe!</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/new-signs-massachusetts-say-stop-invasive-pests-keep-firewood-local.html#comments Pests in the News firewood highway signs firewood pest sign highway massachusetts firewood Keep Firewood Local. Stop Invasive Pests Keep Firewood Local Stop Invasive Pests Tue, 21 Aug 2012 17:05:39 +0000 L. Greenwood 1460 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Unwanted firewood http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/unwanted-firewood.html <p>What if you have firewood that you don&#39;t want? What&#39;s the best way to get rid of the stuff?</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Dear Don&#39;t Move Firewood,</p> <p>I recently bought a house that has a stack of firewood in the back corner of my lot. I won&#39;t be using the firewood due to allergies.&nbsp;</p> <p>What is the best removal plan?</p> <p>Yours,</p> <p>Concerned Cara</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Dear Concerned Cara,</p> <p>Congratulations on buying a house! That&#39;s exciting. Getting rid of the firewood shouldn&#39;t be too hard, even if you don&#39;t want to burn it yourself. Here are some options:</p> <p>- If you have a large lot and it isn&#39;t in the way, you could just leave it there forever. Depends on your planned use of the land, yes, but it is truly doing no harm ecologically by just sitting there, so that&#39;s the simplest method. <em>(NOTE: after originally posting this blog, I was kindly reminded that in some parts of the country, piles of firewood near your house can increase the risks of other pests like carpenter ants, fire ants, or termites setting up shop in or near your home. Further, in the fire-prone parts of the country, firewood piles can be dangerous if there is wildfire in the area. Therefore, unused firewood piles should be a long distance from your house- I&#39;d guess a safe distance is 100ft or more!)</em></p> <p>- I recently read that firewood can be used on-site in the making of very water-efficient raised beds for gardening! How cool! So if you are planning on doing any raised flower beds or vegetable beds in the spring, please look up &quot;Hugelkultur&quot; online for a really neat way to use extra firewood in your gardens. It will reduce the amount of money you need to spend on gardening soil, too! Win-win.</p> <p>- You don&#39;t want to burn it because of your allergies (I presume you are very sensitive to indoor wood particulates) but someone else could burn it, of course. One thing you could do is give it away to a local friend or neighbor that is very nearby. For instance, if you had someone just down the street that burns wood in the winter, you could offer it to them. Moving firewood less than a few miles is quite harmless from the perspective of spreading insects and diseases. It is best to keep it under 10 miles at the top limit, please. And don&#39;t cross any town, county or state borders, as this increases the likelyhood that you could inadvertantly be violating a law or regulation.</p> <p>- At last resort, you could take it to either your solid waste disposal (i.e. town dump) or municipal composting facility, if you have one. I know in my town, the municipal composting place takes logs up to 16&quot; in diameter- pretty huge and certainly bigger than cut firewood. So once you have the time, you could look up your new local services and figure that out.</p> <p>Good luck, and thanks for asking!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/unwanted-firewood.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates dear don't move firewood firewood disposal firewood removal Firewood Tue, 14 Aug 2012 19:05:12 +0000 L. Greenwood 1458 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Grey Foxes and Emerald Ash Borers http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/grey-foxes-and-emerald-ash-borers.html <p>L.E.A.F.s rustling in the Bluegrass @ Grey Fox</p> <p>by Sean Mahoney</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Every summer, four thousand wayward travelers descend upon the pristine hayfields at the Walsh Farm in Oak Hill, NY to the Greyfox Bluegrass festival. Sounds of banjo and fiddle can be heard around nearly every campsite, and even a hoot and a holler from the dance stage.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Hanging out at the festival for four days is awesome enough, but on Friday morning after the rains lifted off the fields, something even more amazing than the actual festival happened; we were greeted by fresh outreach reinforcements courtesy of the <a href="http://www.nature.org/aboutus/careers/leaf/index.htm">Nature Conservancy&rsquo;s LEAF program</a>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>That day, Natalie and I had the pleasure of working with Bless, Gerardo, Mike, and their summer mentor Jim who were spending a month long internship learning and working alongside Conservancy staff in the <a href="http://www.nature.org/ourinitiatives/regions/northamerica/areas/berkshire/index.htm">western Massachusetts</a>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>After getting acquainted with some of the quirks of folk life, including banjos, small children busking for change with scratchy covers of &ldquo;She&rsquo;ll be Comin&rsquo; Round the Mountain&rdquo; and &ldquo;Sally Goodin&rdquo;, flowing tie-dyed pants, men in kilts, and the infamous caravans of VW busses, we were able to convince Bless and Jim to get in the festival spirit by putting on the emerald ash borer costume.</p> <p><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/images/EAB_LEAF.jpg" style="width: 270px; height: 422px;" /></p> <p>At first they were a little nervous about spreading the Don&rsquo;t Move Firewood message, but soon enough it was hard&nbsp; to keep them supplied with materials to hand out because they were moving in full swing and talking to nearly everyone that passed by. Ready with extra Frisbees in hand, Mike was ready to get the message out to campers of all ages.</p> <p><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/images/LEAF_discs.png" style="width: 456px; height: 393px;" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Thanks to the help of the entire LEAF crew, we were able to reach over 2,400 people with the message that transporting firewood can be dangerous to the health of the forests and trees. &nbsp;It was welcome change to have our outreach team nearly triple in size- I wish we could keep them for all of our future festivals lined up this summer! Natalie and I really missed their energy and humor on the road to Newport Folk Festival the following weekend.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>So here&rsquo;s a final message to the LEAF crew: Enjoy the rest of the summer guys, and keep an eye out for Asian longhorned beetle and emerald ash borer when you return home to Boston.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/grey-foxes-and-emerald-ash-borers.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates Emerald ash borer greybox bluegrass festival LEAF program the nature conservancy Thu, 09 Aug 2012 17:23:35 +0000 L. Greenwood 1453 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Hunting with the Wasp Watchers of Massachusetts http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/hunting-wasp-watchers-massachusetts.html <p>Wasp catching with the Wasp Watchers of Massachusetts</p> <p>by Natalie Garcia</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>I have never hunted anything in my life, well not until now at least. In July, the DMF team was very lucky to be able to participate in <a href="http://massnrc.org/pests/blog/2012/06/wasp-watchers-wanted-2.html">Wasp Watchers Massachusetts</a>, a citizen scientist program that uses native wasps to monitor for signs of the emerald ash borer. I was ecstatic to run around and hunt wasps that were returning with their prey, cause who doesn&rsquo;t love the thrill of the chase?</p> <p><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/images/555547_10150901696426651_1224092850_n.jpg" style="width: 320px; height: 320px;" /></p> <p>First thing Monday morning on a hot, dry, beautiful summer day, we were off and it was perfect weather for pursuing <em>Cerceris fumipennis</em> or the smoky-winged wasp. This small wasp loves to prey upon buprestid beetles in order to raise their young and can be key to EAB early detection. We were searching for the females, because they build their nests in dry, sandy areas and are the ones that do the actual searching for beetles to provide food to their young.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>And let me tell you, these are some hard working ladies. When we arrived almost all of the nests were empty; they were already out hunting for borers and beetles. After about 30 minutes of looking at nests and becoming familiar with the wasp homes, some <em>Cerceris</em> began to return to their nests with their fresh prey.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>I felt like I was 8 years old again. It was fascinating how many different borers we were able to collect. In a little under an hour we caught 10 beetles. Not so bad for first timers! We were even able to catch an <em>Agrilus </em>species borer, which is in the same family as EAB and the genus that Wasp Watchers are really interested in finding. Total score. What more could we ask for?</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Fortunately, this was not the only time that we&rsquo;ll be able to adventure into the Berkshires and search for these beetles. Sean and I are going to be able to survey about once a week and we will make sure to keep you posted on any exciting finds we have in the future. Can&rsquo;t wait to feel the wind in my hair, with my net in my hand, while monitoring for invasive bugs!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Resources:</p> <p><a href="http://massnrc.org/pests/blog/2012/06/wasp-watchers-wanted-2.html">http://massnrc.org/pests/blog/2012/06/wasp-watchers-wanted-2.html</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Editor&#39;s note:</strong></p> <p>The remarkable effectiveness of wasp monitoring was underscored by the recent discovery of emerald ash borer in Connecticut by state wasp monitoring efforts. To learn more, visit this press release: <a href="http://www.ct.gov/dep/cwp/view.asp?Q=508244&amp;A=4173">http://www.ct.gov/dep/cwp/view.asp?Q=508244&amp;A=4173 </a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/hunting-wasp-watchers-massachusetts.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates Tue, 07 Aug 2012 20:12:53 +0000 L. Greenwood 1451 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org The Continental Dialogue on Non-native Forest Insects and Diseases http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/continental-dialogue-non-native-forest-insects-and-diseases.html <p>Did you know that the Continental Dialogue on Non-native Forest Insects and Diseases is the organization that founded Don&#39;t Move Firewood? Yup, way back in the prehistory of 2007, the Dialogue (for short) obtained the necessary funding and motivation to start the Don&#39;t Move Firewood campaign. So it is with great pleasure that we announce the Dialogue&#39;s Eighth meeting, to be held in conjunction with the 2012 Arbor Day conference in Sacramento CA. Here&#39;s the full Save The Date notice:</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p align="center"><strong><em>SAVE THE DATE!</em></strong></p> <p align="center"><strong><em>NOVEMBER 13, 2012</em></strong></p> <p align="center"><strong>The Eighth Meeting of the Continental Dialogue on Non-Native Forest Insects and Diseases</strong></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Location:</strong> Sacramento Convention Center, Sacramento California</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Date and Time:</strong> November 13th, 2012 from 8:00 a.m. &ndash; 4:30 p.m.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Details:</strong> The meeting will be held in conjunction with the Arbor Day Foundation&rsquo;s Partners in Community Forestry National Conference. Information about the Continental Dialogue on Non-Native Forest Insects and Diseases meeting as well as the Arbor Day Partners Conference can be found online at: <a href="http://www.arborday.org/pcf">www.arborday.org/pcf</a>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Agenda:</strong> A draft agenda will soon be shared and made available on the Dialogue&rsquo;s website (<a href="http://www.continentalforestdialogue.org">www.continentalforestdialogue.org</a>). This year&rsquo;s speakers will include local partners, educators, business professionals, and Dialogue members. All are welcome, and a diverse range of topics will be covered.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Updates and expert discussions on current Dialogue activities:</p> <ul> <li> -&nbsp; Healthy Urban Tree Initiative</li> <li> - Don&rsquo;t Move Firewood and Firewood Outreach Coordinating Initiative</li> <li> - Promoting the new documentary: Trees, Pests &amp; People</li> <li> - Prevention Initiative</li> <li> - How to use Social Media to slow the spread</li> <li> - Local Successes and Experiences</li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Registration:</strong> To register for the Dialogue meeting, please visit the Arbor Day Foundation Partners and Community Forestry Conference site (<a href="http://www.arborday.org/pcf">www.arborday.org/pcf</a>).</p> <p>Fees for the one day Dialogue Annual Meeting are $150/person ($175/person after October 22, 2012). This covers all meeting costs, lunch, snacks and an evening social mixer.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>For more information about the Dialogue, or to join the Dialogue, please visit: <a href="http://www.continentalforestdialogue.org">www.continentalforestdialogue.org</a>. For more information regarding meeting registration, please visit the Arbor Day conference website (<a href="http://www.arborday.org/pcf">www.arborday.org/pcf</a>).</p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/continental-dialogue-non-native-forest-insects-and-diseases.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates Firewood Tue, 07 Aug 2012 17:27:48 +0000 L. Greenwood 1450 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org So you want your own costume? http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/so-you-want-your-own-costume.html <p>A surprising number of people want their own emerald ash borer costume, or Asian longhorned beetle costume. While we are always happy to share our costume through our very cost-efficient costume share program, I can totally understand that anyone using a costume more than about three times a year could benefit from having their own. In response to getting these questions a fair amount, here&#39;s my new FAQ on bug costumes;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Who made your costumes?</strong></p> <p>Our EAB, along with several other EAB costumes around the country, was made by a volunteer in the midwestern US that has since passed away. Subsequent copies of her design have been made by many amateur and professional costume makers. Our ALB costume and our Log costume were made by a professional costume maker in the Washington DC area. If you would like the information for that professional costume maker, please email info@dontmovefirewood dot org, and we&#39;ll pass it along to you.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>How would I go about making my own costume?</strong></p> <p>The easiest thing to do is to find a local well recommended costume maker, and show them a LOT of photos of what you want. Your best resource for bug costume making people is likely either your local university&#39;s theatre department, or any sort of community theatre group in your area. Ask them for recommendations on who is reliable and creative for their costume needs. Once you have that information, visit our facebook page <a href="http://www.facebook.com/dontmovefirewood">www.facebook.com/dontmovefirewood </a>to show your newly found costume maker our collection of bug costume photographs. Along with a few pictures of the actual insect itself, this should be enough to get your costume maker ready for action!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>How much will it probably cost?</strong></p> <p>The cost of costumes is largely dependent on labor costs. Therefore, rough estimates are really hard because it depending on how fancy your costume is, and your local wages for this sort of thing. However, if I had to guess, I&#39;d say the lowest range would be US$250 (free or nearly free labor, plus the cost of materials), and many costumes could reasonably cost over US$700 (medium costs of labor, plus materials).</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Any special tips on costumes?</strong></p> <p>Two things; Ask the costume maker to make the costume so that you can have it dry cleaned (otherwise it will soon grow to smell bad), and also ask them to make it so it fits anyone from 5&#39;4&quot; to 6&#39;2&quot; or so. You don&#39;t want to make a costume that only fits super tall people, because that limits your pool of volunteers. Having the shirt and pants underneath not be integral to the costume is best, because it makes it easier to fit on many body types, and keep the laundering process simpler.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Best of luck with your costume making!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates ALB costume bug costume costume FAQ EAB costume insect costume Forest Mon, 06 Aug 2012 16:48:17 +0000 L. Greenwood 1448 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Giant EAB seen at the Bridge of Flowers http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/giant-eab-seen-bridge-flowers.html <p>In the next of our series of blogs from the Don&#39;t Move Firewood summer interns, Natalie marauds around the gorgeous gardens at Bridge of Flowers in Shelburne Falls as Esmeralda the Emerald Ash Borer.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Deerfield River Festival - EAB Invasion of the Bridge of Flowers</strong></p> <p>by Natalie Garcia</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>What&rsquo;s 5&rsquo;3&rdquo;, has 2 antennae, is metallic green, and loves to run around on the Bridge of Flowers? That&rsquo;s what a lot of people were trying to figure out in Shelburne Falls a couple of weeks ago when we were on our way to Deerfield River Festival. Well the answer is ME! I suited up, not as Natalie Garcia, but as Esmeralda the Emerald Ash Borer&mdash;a sassy borer with a big agenda&ndash;because what EAB doesn&rsquo;t have a big agenda?</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/images/natalieeab.JPG" style="width: 320px; height: 429px;" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>If you haven&rsquo;t heard, these borers are bad news. They&rsquo;ve been described by the USDA Forest Service as the &ldquo;most destructive forest insect introduced into North America in recent history&rdquo; having infested trees in 16 states as well as parts of Canada. In Michigan alone the EAB has killed more than 30 million ash trees. Pretty darn impressive for a bug that&rsquo;s smaller than a penny!</p> <p>So back to the point of this post, the Bridge of Flowers visitors were having a lot of fun speculating on what I was. Many people appeared to be alarmed by my presence, which they should be because I was there to stir up some trouble, but they listened to Sean and me tell them about invasive insects and the threats they pose.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>After this escapade, it was finally time to go to Deerfield Fest. It turned out to be a friendly festival, filled with lots of whitewater lovers that luckily for us, also loved the idea of not moving firewood. It was also a great time for Sean and me to show off our sick Frisbee skills to everyone, needless to say we killed it&hellip; but not really.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Until next time, if you&rsquo;re enjoying a nice walk through the forest, the Bridge of Flowers, or your favorite outdoor spot, keep your eyes out for signs of the not-so-big real emerald ash borer.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Resources:</p> <p><a href="http://na.fs.fed.us/pubs/eab/eab_strategy.pdf">http://na.fs.fed.us/pubs/eab/eab_strategy.pdf</a></p> <p><a href="http://www.na.fs.fed.us/spfo/pubs/pest_al/eab/eab04.htm">http://www.na.fs.fed.us/spfo/pubs/pest_al/eab/eab04.htm</a></p> <p><a href="http://www.emeraldashborer.info/michiganinfo.cfm">http://www.emeraldashborer.info/michiganinfo.cfm</a></p> <style type="text/css"></style> http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/giant-eab-seen-bridge-flowers.html#comments Don't Move Firewood updates bridge of flowers deerfield river festival EAB Emerald ash borer summer interns Fri, 03 Aug 2012 21:30:32 +0000 L. Greenwood 1447 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org From Oregon to Washington http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/oregon-washington.html <p>Oregon, Washington and Idaho have been doing some great outreach and education on the topic of firewood movement over the last few years. So here&#39;s a good question from that region for our advice column...</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Dear Don&#39;t Move Firewood,</em></p> <p><em>We live in So. Oregon and are going to be camping in a Washington state park later this summer. Is it okay to bring dimensional lumber scraps to use as firewood; we have some cut-up pallets and some redwood from our former deck that we&#39;d like to bring along?</em></p> <p><em>Yours, </em></p> <p><em>Linda</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Dear Linda,</p> <p>I decided to take this one up with the experts, and asked Wendy Brown with the Washington Invasive Species Council. She wrote back, &quot;Linda, thanks for your great question. If you have scrap lumber or pallets that have been lying around for a year or more, there is the potential for that material to become infested with a hitchhiker. Because of that, it&#39;s always best to &quot;Buy it Where you Burn it.&quot; Also, wood used for decks is almost always chemically treated, and it&#39;s not a good idea for your health to burn wood that has been chemically treated.&quot;</p> <p>So that&#39;s a helpful perspective- even wood that isn&#39;t right out of a tree can still have hitchhikers like moth egg cases, or contaminated dirt. Speaking of contaminated dirt- did you know that parts of Southern Oregon, where you live, have a tree disease called Sudden Oak Death? It spreads within soil and water and kills many types of trees and shrubs, especially oaks. So if those scrap lumber pieces, cut pallets, or deck redwood is being stored outside at all, it is absolutely a possible way to spread forest pests.</p> <p>The bottom line is that you shouldn&#39;t bring it. Instead, please burn it this winter at home if you have a fireplace. Thanks for asking!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> buy it where you burn it dear don't move firewood don't move firewood oregon washington wendy brown Bugs Thu, 26 Jul 2012 20:04:38 +0000 L. Greenwood 1436 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org BREAKING: Firewood movement linked to new ALB location in Ohio http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/breaking-firewood-movement-linked-new-alb-location-ohio.html <p>This just in! A press release from the Ohio Department of Agriculture has firmly pointed the finger at firewood movement in 2010 (before the ALB was discovered in OH, thus before the quarantine was in place) as the cause of a new location of ALB in the greater Ohio ALB infested area. Please note that the author of this press release is NOT Don&#39;t Move Firewood, it is the Ohio Department of Agriculture.</p> <p class="rtecenter">&nbsp;</p> <p class="rtecenter">Ohio Department of Agriculture Announces New Discovery of Asian Longhorned Beetle in Clermont County</p> <p class="rtecenter"> <strong>Firewood cited as source of new infestation</strong></p> <p> REYNOLDSBURG, OH (July 20, 2012) &ndash; The Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA), in collaboration with<br /> the United States&rsquo; Department of Agriculture&rsquo;s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) today<br /> announced the discovery of the Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB) on two properties in Stonelick Township<br /> in Clermont County.</p> <p> The center of the newly discovered infestation is on Possum Hollow Road within southern Stonelick<br /> Township in Clermont County. State and federal officials cite the movement of firewood in 2010 from<br /> Tate Township, prior to the current ALB quarantine zone being established, as the source of the new<br /> discovery.</p> <p> APHIS and ODA inspection crews are surveying the surrounding areas to determine the extent of the<br /> ALB infestation. Crews will inspect host tree species susceptible to ALB for signs of the wood‐boring<br /> beetle using ground surveyors and specially trained tree climbers. Once the extent of the infestation is<br /> evaluated, ODA will move to expand the ALB quarantine to include additional properties near the new<br /> infestation. When available, a map of the regulated properties will be posted at <a href="http://www.agri.ohio.gov" title="www.agri.ohio.gov">www.agri.ohio.gov</a>.<br /> In September 2011, firewood movement from Tate Township was cited as the source of an ALB<br /> infestation on properties in Monroe Township in Clermont County.</p> <p> &ldquo;To prevent the spread of this destructive insect, it is crucial that firewood not be moved from areas<br /> known to have ALB,&rdquo; said Matt Beal, chief of the ODA Division of Plant Health. &ldquo;As we learn more about<br /> where potentially infested material has moved in recent years, it is important for property owners<br /> familiarize themselves with the signs of an ALB infestation, monitor your trees and firewood, and as the<br /> property owner did correctly in this instance, report any signs of infestation as soon as possible.&rdquo;<br /> Adult ALBs are large, shiny black insects measuring 1 to 1 &frac12; inches long, not including antennae, with<br /> random white spots. Their white‐banded antennae can be as long as the body itself on females and<br /> almost twice the body length on males.</p> <p> Signs of infestation include perfectly round exit holes (about 3/8 to 1/2 inch in diameter) made by adult<br /> beetles when they emerge from trees; the pockmarks on tree trunks and branches where female<br /> beetles deposit eggs; frass (wood shavings and saw dust) produced by larvae feeding and tunneling;<br /> early fall coloration of leaves or dead branches, and running sap produced by the tree at the egg laying<br /> sites, or in response to larval tunneling.</p> <p> To report signs or symptoms of ALB, please call the Ohio ALB Cooperative Eradication Program Office at<br /> 513‐381‐7180 or report online at <a href="http://www.BeetleBusters.info" title="www.BeetleBusters.info">www.BeetleBusters.info</a>.</p> <p> ‐‐</p> <p> Media Contacts: Brett Gates, Ohio Department of Agriculture, (614) 752‐9817<br /> Rhonda Santos, USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, (508) 852‐8044</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Outbreaks asian longhorned beetle clermony county firewood firewood movement Bugs Fri, 20 Jul 2012 18:40:37 +0000 L. Greenwood 1432 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org All about our Costume Share program http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/all-about-our-costume-share-program.html <p>Are you spreading the word about invasive insects at events this summer or fall? You should consider borrowing our fantastic insect costumes!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What?</strong> As part of our international outreach program, Don&rsquo;t Move Firewood, we offer a selection of three different forest pest related costumes for use at any well attended appropriate educational opportunity.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Where?</strong> Our emerald ash borer, Asian longhorned beetle, and &ldquo;piece of firewood&rdquo; costumes show up in some amazing places: &ldquo;green&rdquo; expos in Colorado, campfire chats in New Hampshire, parades in Ontario Canada, and public meetings in Ohio. Our emerald ash borer costume is especially popular at Minor League Baseball games&mdash;and we are proud to say that the EAB is already booked for the Little League World Championship this fall in Pennsylvania&mdash;a fun first for our costume share program.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Why?</strong> We run the costume share program because it is cost efficient, educational, and it builds partnerships. As Don&rsquo;t Move Firewood expands as a campaign, we are constantly seeking to make long term connections other groups that are motivated to educate the public on the issue of forest pest movement on firewood.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>How?</strong> Any non-profit entity can simply book one of our cool costumes by emailing our team (<a href="mailto:info@dontmovefirewood.org">info@dontmovefirewood.org</a>) with the type of event, dates needed, and contact information. From there, the team at Don&rsquo;t Move Firewood takes care of all the logistics. The only cost to the costume borrower is one-way insured shipping. And in return, we merely ask for photos of the costume in use.</p> <p><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/images/eabedited.jpg" style="width: 300px; height: 459px;" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>So spread the word!</strong> Become our <a href="https://www.facebook.com/DontMoveFirewood">friend on Facebook</a> to see lots of funny pictures of our costumes in action, and if you have an event that could benefit from an eye catching four foot high firewood costume, a bright green funny emerald ash borer costume, or a (roughly) scientifically accurate Asian longhorned beetle costume, send us an email.</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates Bugs Mon, 16 Jul 2012 19:53:41 +0000 L. Greenwood 1429 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Wanderlust Festival and the Purple Traps http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/wanderlust-festival-and-purple-traps.html <p>In the second of our series of blogs from the Don&#39;t Move Firewood summer interns, Sean ponders the meaning of yoga, donuts, purple traps, and the lack of open coffee shops at 6:30am.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Wanderlust: Slackasana and Purple Trap Roadtrips </strong><br /> by Sean Mahoney</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>This past weekend did involve a road trip to the great north woods, but nothing of the Jack Kerouac or Easy Rider sort of interactions took place. Instead the day started as most road days start for our outreach crew.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>6am: On the road with no breakfast to be found in the sleepy towns along Route 7, but the chance to enjoy all the beauty of Vermont is all I need at this moment.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>6:30am: Ok. All of that wishy-washy poetics about the open road and the beauty of Vermont is out the window. I&rsquo;m so hungry, and why is there no food on the only highway to Vermont from western Massachusetts for 30 miles?</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Purple Trap&hellip;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>7am: Off in the distance a glimmer of hope emerges in the soft morning mist rising off the lake. Could it be? Yes! The sweet savory deliciousness of Donut Man off in the distance. Soon my hunger will be vanquished by a red velvet cake donut accompanied by an orange juice of exceptional temperature and quality.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>8am: Cross the border to Vermont, the land of Ben and Jerry&rsquo;s and real maple syrup.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Purple Trap&hellip;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Double Purple Trap&hellip;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>What are these Purple Traps, you might ask? For those of you who are not among the dedicated band of forest entomologists who keep up with the happenings of Don&rsquo;t Move Firewood on their lunch hour, I have included a picture of one. Perhaps you&rsquo;ve seen them on your local roads?</p> <p><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/images/purpletraplowrez.jpg" style="width: 300px; height: 234px;" /></p> <p>The secret of the emerald ash borer monitoring trap is thought to be the purple coloration. Just as I was attracted to Donut Man this morning due to my hunger, an emerald ash borer is probably attracted to the purple coloration.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Look at the photograph below and compare it to the color of the trap above. See how the lower abdomen is a glistening purple?</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/images/eabpenny.jpg" style="width: 300px; height: 203px;" /></p> <p>The idea is the beetles are attracted to that same purple- and hence the purple traps set up in 47 states to map the spread of the EAB outbreak. If you see a purple trap in your neighborhood, you can post a picture of it on <a href="http://www.facebook.com/hungrypests">http://www.facebook.com/hungrypests</a>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Wait, where was I? Wanderlust&hellip; oh right Wanderlust.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Imagine this:</p> <ul> <li> &nbsp;</li> <li> A ski hill with no snow</li> <li> Beautiful views of the Green Mountains</li> <li> Peace and relaxation with yoga classes running all day for an entire weekend</li> <li> Slackasana (yoga on a slackline)</li> <li> Acro Yoga (aka holding 120 to 200 plus pounds of yogi above your head while you both simultaneously move together)</li> <li> A dome of Gongs that seemed to bring rain and thunder at the same point in the afternoon every day</li> <li> A human sized emerald ash borer spreading the word about looking out for signs of invasive insects and not moving firewood</li> <li> Some of the kindest free spirits who want to do all that they can to keep mother earth healthy including not moving firewood when they are not doing yoga</li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Natalie and I summed up the experience like this:</p> <p><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/images/wanderlustfestnote.jpg" style="width: 300px; height: 392px;" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Namaste</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>-Sean</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates EAB outreach purple box purple trap summer don't move firewood vermont wanderlust Wed, 11 Jul 2012 15:45:11 +0000 L. Greenwood 1418 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Where do I even ask this question? http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/where-do-i-even-ask-question.html <p>50 states, thousands of counties, quarantines, regulations, violations, oh my! Who do you ask when you have a question that is really specific to your situation?</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Dear Don&#39;t Move Firewood,</em></p> <p><em>sun july 2nd from wind had HICKORY tree blow down, what is safe distance to move it live in lawrenceburg ky, would like to sell to B-B-Q place or like may cracker barrel want to make sure it ok.</em></p> <p><em>Thanks,</em></p> <p><em>Bob</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Dear Bob,</p> <p>Glad you asked. The first thing I would do is just ask some local knowledgeable authorities. Sometimes that&#39;s a division of forestry, county extension, or the state department of agriculture offices. In your case, I think asking a county extension officer is going to be an easy and quick method of figuring out if there is anything worrisome (or illegal) about moving this dead hickory tree. The University of Kentucky has a great map to help you find who to call that you can use here <a href="http://www.ca.uky.edu/county/">http://www.ca.uky.edu/county/ </a>. One question you should certainly ask is if the movement of hardwood firewood is permissable in your county. In some counties of Kentucky, all hardwood firewood is under quarantine, so that&#39;s a big concern.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Good luck!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates county extension firewood hardwood firewood hickory kentucky smoking wood Tue, 10 Jul 2012 16:24:13 +0000 L. Greenwood 1415 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org The interns are guest blogging! http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/interns-are-guest-blogging.html <p>Don&rsquo;t Move Firewood Outreach Interns, Natalie and Sean are back in action!&nbsp; They are travelling New York and New England &ndash; camped out at festivals and fairs &ndash; educating the public about how to keep America&rsquo;s forests safe from invasive insects. Here&rsquo;s the first chapter in their summer adventure!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Clearwater: Great Hudson River Revival &ndash; Overcoming the Outreach Hangover<br /> by Natalie Garcia</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Outreach is hard. Continuously relaying information and travelling long hours adds some wear and tear onto a summer. Needless to say, even after a year off from the Don&rsquo;t Move Firewood campaign, Sean and I had a little bit of an outreach hangover &ndash; or as Sean described it, an unawareness of just how much work we would be doing and how much greasy, gross festival food we would be eating. Don&rsquo;t get me wrong I am <em>thrilled</em> to be back, but an outreach hangover is no joke.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The first event was <em>Clearwater: Great Hudson River Revival</em> and I was eager to get the ball rolling. Our morning went as follows:</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>5:00am &ndash; Alarms goes off&hellip; &ldquo;I&rsquo;m getting too old for this&rdquo;</p> <p>5:30am &ndash; Somehow leave the house in one piece without forgetting anything</p> <p>5:35am &ndash; Realize that absolutely nothing in the Berkshires <em>(rural Western Massachusetts)</em> is open at 5:35am</p> <p>5:36am &ndash; post realization that I won&rsquo;t be having any coffee &ndash; complain to Sean for the next 2 hours that I can&rsquo;t believe that nothing is open*</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>As you can see, this was just the beginning of my now very large outreach hangover, but once I finally had some food and coffee I was determined to get over this hurdle. And Clearwater did not disappoint.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/images/summer.jpg" style="width: 350px; height: 286px;" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Over the two day event we were able to talk to more than 2,000 people about invasive pests, specifically the emerald ash borer (EAB) and the Asian longhorned beetle (ALB), and how carrying firewood with you when go camping or for any other reason can risk the health of forests and trees everywhere. Many of the festival attendees were aware of the issues, having heard us at events last year or from billboards and other PSAs. But there were many folks that we were able to talk to that hadn&rsquo;t heard our message before, which is always fun, refreshing, and very exciting.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>In addition to informing the people of Clearwater about invasive pests, I was able to hear a fantastic live swing band called Swingology, talk to some very cool and passionate individuals, and was not so disappointed by the fact that there was a great Indian food tent&mdash;not as greasy and gross as I thought!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>So what&rsquo;s the cure to an outreach hangover, you may ask? Other than having great co-workers to push you through it, enjoying the day, the people, and the events that we go to is a big part of effectively conveying an important message. Enduring Saturday&rsquo;s rough morning was well worth the reward.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>*&nbsp; Yes I&rsquo;ve been spoiled by the Bronx; there are 24 hour establishments there.</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates berkshires don't move firewood summer campaign interns that's what tree said Mon, 09 Jul 2012 18:27:44 +0000 L. Greenwood 1414 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Invasive species and native species http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/invasive-species-and-native-species.html <p>Here&#39;s a thought provoking question; what is a native species? When does it move far enough from where it is now, to where it goes to, to become a non-native species? This isn&#39;t a question from your biology class, it is a real quandary. For instance,&nbsp; the goldspotted oak borer is an invasive species in Southern California, but its origin isn&#39;t that far off- Northern Mexico and parts of Arizona. I discussed this with reporter Clint Williams last week, to support his excellent article in Mother Nature News,<a href="http://www.mnn.com/earth-matters/wilderness-resources/stories/imported-firewood-can-be-more-dangerous-than-fire"> Imported firewood can be more dangerous than fire</a>. Crossing a major biological divide- like a huge desert- is just as potentially damaging as crossing the Atlantic or Pacific ocean, when it comes to the transport of pests.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>This issue also came up in a recent email from the Don&#39;t Move Firewood advice line. So let&#39;s take a look at that!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Dear Don&#39;t Move Firewood,</em></p> <p><em>Dandelion seeds are light and fluffy so they will blow long distances and spread. Burdocks cling to jeans and fur and are carried long distances to spread species. Transporting species from one region to another helps nature. The insects and the trees are both part of nature.</em></p> <p><em>Yours,</em></p> <p><em>Tom</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Dear Tom,</p> <p>You are misunderstanding the issue at hand. Don&#39;t Move Firewood isn&#39;t because we are concerned that native, natural, local insects will be spread throughout their appropriate habitats. This isn&#39;t about creatures that belong in the landscape. This is about invasive species. Invasives are things that reproduce, damage, and even kill in an out of control fashion, because they do not belong. Insects and trees are part of nature, but these particular insects are NOT part of <u>this</u> nature. These insects and diseases belong in far off lands, or at least biologically separate lands, where they originally evolved. When people move them, they escape &quot;nature&quot; in the truest sense, and grow out of control. Transporting these species is destructive.</p> <p>Thanks for reading.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates burdock dandelions dear don't move firewood exotics invasive species invasives native species Tue, 03 Jul 2012 18:00:48 +0000 L. Greenwood 1403 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Fourth of July press release is here http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/fourth-july-press-release-here.html <div id="rpuCopySelection" style="text-align: left; font-size: 12px; color: black; position: fixed; top: 0px; left: -5000px; width: 2000px; display: block;"> <p><i>Keep our country&#39;s natural heritage safe from invasive insects and diseases this <span class="xn-chron">Fourth of July</span></i></p> <p><span class="xn-location">ARLINGTON, Va.</span>, <span class="xn-chron">June 29, 2012</span> /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ --&nbsp;Thousands of Americans celebrate <span class="xn-chron">Independence Day</span> by heading to national and state parks, campgrounds, and forests to enjoy the outdoors. Many will bring along their own firewood for convenience - not realizing that bringing firewood from home poses a serious risk to the nation&#39;s forests by potentially spreading tree-killing pests. Many states, and several federal agencies, consider this risk severe enough to implement regulations restricting the movement of firewood, and in some places violations can come with a hefty fine.</p> <p>&quot;The <span class="xn-chron">Fourth of July</span> holiday is a time when we all remember what an amazing country we live in, and healthy trees and forests are integral to the beauty of our lands and waters,&quot; said <span class="xn-person">Leigh Greenwood</span>, <i>Don&#39;t Move Firewood</i> campaign manager, The Nature Conservancy. &quot;Tens of thousands of trees are destroyed every year by invasive tree-killing insects, and one of the most important steps everyone can take to protect our natural heritage is to stop moving forest pests to new areas on firewood. It&#39;s really that simple.&quot;</p> <p>In many states, regulations limit how far firewood can be legally transported, and some states prohibit the entrance of out-of-state firewood altogether. These regulations most frequently include prohibitions against moving firewood over 50 miles or over state lines, although some states have stricter limits in place. For example, some states prohibit movement of firewood to state parks or other state-managed lands from more than 25 miles away. Additionally, the USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has federal quarantines in many states on wood products (including firewood, wooden pallets, and other materials) that could harbor pests like the Asian longhorned beetle, emerald ash borer, and other damaging pests and pathogens.</p> <p>&quot;We encourage everyone to help protect our country&#39;s natural resources from invasive species,&quot; said APHIS spokesperson <span class="xn-person">Joelle Hayden</span>.&nbsp; &quot;Taking basic steps &ndash; like not moving firewood and following federal and state quarantines &ndash; will help keep these dangerous pests from spreading unintentionally.&quot;</p> <p>More than 450 non-native forest insects and diseases are now established in <span class="xn-location">the United States</span>. While most can&#39;t move far on their own, many pests can hitchhike undetected on firewood, starting new infestations in locations hundreds of miles away. These infestations can destroy forests, lower property values, and cost huge sums of money to control. Over the last hundred years, introduced species of invasive insects and diseases have killed tens of millions of trees in forests, cities, and towns across the country. In addition to the Asian longhorned beetle and emerald ash borer, these tree-killing pests include Dutch elm disease, Sirex woodwasp, thousand cankers disease, hemlock woolly adelgid, sudden oak death, laurel wilt, and many others.</p> <p>Following are tips from the <i>Don&#39;t Move Firewood </i>campaign:</p> <ul class="discStyle" type="disc"> <li> Take care to respect all state and local regulations on the movement of firewood and other unprocessed wood &ndash; some areas are subject to serious fines for violations. For more information, visit <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/the-problem/state-state-information/index.html" target="_blank">http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/the-problem/state-state-information/index.html</a>.</li> <li> For a list of federal and state quarantine areas, visit: <a href="http://www.nps.gov/grsm/planyourvisit/quarantine-counties.htm" target="_blank">http://www.nps.gov/grsm/planyourvisit/quarantine-counties.htm</a>.</li> <li> Obtain firewood near the location where you will burn it &ndash; that means the wood was cut in a nearby forest, in the same county, or a maximum of 25-50 miles from where you&#39;ll have your fire depending on state regulations.</li> <li> Commercially kiln-dried wood is a good option if you must transport firewood.</li> <li> If you notice an insect or tree disease you don&#39;t recognize, take a photo or obtain a specimen of it, and compare it to Web site photos of the suspected pest. A good resource to help in identification is: <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/gallery-of-pests" target="_blank">http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/gallery-of-pests</a>.</li> <li> If you believe you have found a new outbreak of an invasive insect or disease, contact your state department of agriculture: <a href="http://www.rma.usda.gov/other/stateag.html" target="_blank">http://www.rma.usda.gov/other/stateag.html</a>.</li> <li> Tell your friends and others about the risks of moving firewood &ndash; no one wants to be responsible for starting a new pest infestation.</li> </ul> <p>To learn more about how to prevent forest pests from destroying forests, log onto <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/" target="_blank">www.dontmovefirewood.org</a>.</p> <p id="clply-tag" style="font-size: smaller;">Source: <a href="http://s.tt/1gm3z">PR Newswire</a> (<a href="http://s.tt/1gm3z">http://s.tt/1gm3z</a>)</p> <div id="rpuCopySelection" style="text-align: left; font-size: 12px; color: black; position: fixed; top: 0px; left: -5000px; width: 2000px; display: block;"> <p><i>Keep our country&#39;s natural heritage safe from invasive insects and diseases this <span class="xn-chron">Fourth of July</span></i></p> <p><span class="xn-location">ARLINGTON, Va.</span>, <span class="xn-chron">June 29, 2012</span> /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ --&nbsp;Thousands of Americans celebrate <span class="xn-chron">Independence Day</span> by heading to national and state parks, campgrounds, and forests to enjoy the outdoors. Many will bring along their own firewood for convenience - not realizing that bringing firewood from home poses a serious risk to the nation&#39;s forests by potentially spreading tree-killing pests. Many states, and several federal agencies, consider this risk severe enough to implement regulations restricting the movement of firewood, and in some places violations can come with a hefty fine.</p> <p>&quot;The <span class="xn-chron">Fourth of July</span> holiday is a time when we all remember what an amazing country we live in, and healthy trees and forests are integral to the beauty of our lands and waters,&quot; said <span class="xn-person">Leigh Greenwood</span>, <i>Don&#39;t Move Firewood</i> campaign manager, The Nature Conservancy. &quot;Tens of thousands of trees are destroyed every year by invasive tree-killing insects, and one of the most important steps everyone can take to protect our natural heritage is to stop moving forest pests to new areas on firewood. It&#39;s really that simple.&quot;</p> <p>In many states, regulations limit how far firewood can be legally transported, and some states prohibit the entrance of out-of-state firewood altogether. These regulations most frequently include prohibitions against moving firewood over 50 miles or over state lines, although some states have stricter limits in place. For example, some states prohibit movement of firewood to state parks or other state-managed lands from more than 25 miles away. Additionally, the USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has federal quarantines in many states on wood products (including firewood, wooden pallets, and other materials) that could harbor pests like the Asian longhorned beetle, emerald ash borer, and other damaging pests and pathogens.</p> <p>&quot;We encourage everyone to help protect our country&#39;s natural resources from invasive species,&quot; said APHIS spokesperson <span class="xn-person">Joelle Hayden</span>.&nbsp; &quot;Taking basic steps &ndash; like not moving firewood and following federal and state quarantines &ndash; will help keep these dangerous pests from spreading unintentionally.&quot;</p> <p>More than 450 non-native forest insects and diseases are now established in <span class="xn-location">the United States</span>. While most can&#39;t move far on their own, many pests can hitchhike undetected on firewood, starting new infestations in locations hundreds of miles away. These infestations can destroy forests, lower property values, and cost huge sums of money to control. Over the last hundred years, introduced species of invasive insects and diseases have killed tens of millions of trees in forests, cities, and towns across the country. In addition to the Asian longhorned beetle and emerald ash borer, these tree-killing pests include Dutch elm disease, Sirex woodwasp, thousand cankers disease, hemlock woolly adelgid, sudden oak death, laurel wilt, and many others.</p> <p>Following are tips from the <i>Don&#39;t Move Firewood </i>campaign:</p> <ul class="discStyle" type="disc"> <li> Take care to respect all state and local regulations on the movement of firewood and other unprocessed wood &ndash; some areas are subject to serious fines for violations. For more information, visit <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/the-problem/state-state-information/index.html" target="_blank">http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/the-problem/state-state-information/index.html</a>.</li> <li> For a list of federal and state quarantine areas, visit: <a href="http://www.nps.gov/grsm/planyourvisit/quarantine-counties.htm" target="_blank">http://www.nps.gov/grsm/planyourvisit/quarantine-counties.htm</a>.</li> <li> Obtain firewood near the location where you will burn it &ndash; that means the wood was cut in a nearby forest, in the same county, or a maximum of 25-50 miles from where you&#39;ll have your fire depending on state regulations.</li> <li> Commercially kiln-dried wood is a good option if you must transport firewood.</li> <li> If you notice an insect or tree disease you don&#39;t recognize, take a photo or obtain a specimen of it, and compare it to Web site photos of the suspected pest. A good resource to help in identification is: <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/gallery-of-pests" target="_blank">http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/gallery-of-pests</a>.</li> <li> If you believe you have found a new outbreak of an invasive insect or disease, contact your state department of agriculture: <a href="http://www.rma.usda.gov/other/stateag.html" target="_blank">http://www.rma.usda.gov/other/stateag.html</a>.</li> <li> Tell your friends and others about the risks of moving firewood &ndash; no one wants to be responsible for starting a new pest infestation.</li> </ul> <p>To learn more about how to prevent forest pests from destroying forests, log onto <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/" target="_blank">www.dontmovefirewood.org</a>.</p> <p id="clply-tag" style="font-size: smaller;">Source: <a href="http://s.tt/1gm3z">PR Newswire</a> (<a href="http://s.tt/1gm3z">http://s.tt/1gm3z</a>)</p> </div> </div> <div id="rpuCopySelection" style="text-align: left; font-size: 12px; color: black; position: fixed; top: 0px; left: -5000px; width: 2000px; display: block;"> <p><i>Keep our country&#39;s natural heritage safe from invasive insects and diseases this <span class="xn-chron">Fourth of July</span></i></p> <p><span class="xn-location">ARLINGTON, Va.</span>, <span class="xn-chron">June 29, 2012</span> /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ --&nbsp;Thousands of Americans celebrate <span class="xn-chron">Independence Day</span> by heading to national and state parks, campgrounds, and forests to enjoy the outdoors. Many will bring along their own firewood for convenience - not realizing that bringing firewood from home poses a serious risk to the nation&#39;s forests by potentially spreading tree-killing pests. Many states, and several federal agencies, consider this risk severe enough to implement regulations restricting the movement of firewood, and in some places violations can come with a hefty fine.</p> <p>&quot;The <span class="xn-chron">Fourth of July</span> holiday is a time when we all remember what an amazing country we live in, and healthy trees and forests are integral to the beauty of our lands and waters,&quot; said <span class="xn-person">Leigh Greenwood</span>, <i>Don&#39;t Move Firewood</i> campaign manager, The Nature Conservancy. &quot;Tens of thousands of trees are destroyed every year by invasive tree-killing insects, and one of the most important steps everyone can take to protect our natural heritage is to stop moving forest pests to new areas on firewood. It&#39;s really that simple.&quot;</p> <p>In many states, regulations limit how far firewood can be legally transported, and some states prohibit the entrance of out-of-state firewood altogether. These regulations most frequently include prohibitions against moving firewood over 50 miles or over state lines, although some states have stricter limits in place. For example, some states prohibit movement of firewood to state parks or other state-managed lands from more than 25 miles away. Additionally, the USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has federal quarantines in many states on wood products (including firewood, wooden pallets, and other materials) that could harbor pests like the Asian longhorned beetle, emerald ash borer, and other damaging pests and pathogens.</p> <p>&quot;We encourage everyone to help protect our country&#39;s natural resources from invasive species,&quot; said APHIS spokesperson <span class="xn-person">Joelle Hayden</span>.&nbsp; &quot;Taking basic steps &ndash; like not moving firewood and following federal and state quarantines &ndash; will help keep these dangerous pests from spreading unintentionally.&quot;</p> <p>More than 450 non-native forest insects and diseases are now established in <span class="xn-location">the United States</span>. While most can&#39;t move far on their own, many pests can hitchhike undetected on firewood, starting new infestations in locations hundreds of miles away. These infestations can destroy forests, lower property values, and cost huge sums of money to control. Over the last hundred years, introduced species of invasive insects and diseases have killed tens of millions of trees in forests, cities, and towns across the country. In addition to the Asian longhorned beetle and emerald ash borer, these tree-killing pests include Dutch elm disease, Sirex woodwasp, thousand cankers disease, hemlock woolly adelgid, sudden oak death, laurel wilt, and many others.</p> <p>Following are tips from the <i>Don&#39;t Move Firewood </i>campaign:</p> <ul class="discStyle" type="disc"> <li> Take care to respect all state and local regulations on the movement of firewood and other unprocessed wood &ndash; some areas are subject to serious fines for violations. For more information, visit <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/the-problem/state-state-information/index.html" target="_blank">http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/the-problem/state-state-information/index.html</a>.</li> <li> For a list of federal and state quarantine areas, visit: <a href="http://www.nps.gov/grsm/planyourvisit/quarantine-counties.htm" target="_blank">http://www.nps.gov/grsm/planyourvisit/quarantine-counties.htm</a>.</li> <li> Obtain firewood near the location where you will burn it &ndash; that means the wood was cut in a nearby forest, in the same county, or a maximum of 25-50 miles from where you&#39;ll have your fire depending on state regulations.</li> <li> Commercially kiln-dried wood is a good option if you must transport firewood.</li> <li> If you notice an insect or tree disease you don&#39;t recognize, take a photo or obtain a specimen of it, and compare it to Web site photos of the suspected pest. A good resource to help in identification is: <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/gallery-of-pests" target="_blank">http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/gallery-of-pests</a>.</li> <li> If you believe you have found a new outbreak of an invasive insect or disease, contact your state department of agriculture: <a href="http://www.rma.usda.gov/other/stateag.html" target="_blank">http://www.rma.usda.gov/other/stateag.html</a>.</li> <li> Tell your friends and others about the risks of moving firewood &ndash; no one wants to be responsible for starting a new pest infestation.</li> </ul> <p>To learn more about how to prevent forest pests from destroying forests, log onto <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/" target="_blank">www.dontmovefirewood.org</a>.</p> <p id="clply-tag" style="font-size: smaller;">Source: <a href="http://s.tt/1gm3z">PR Newswire</a> (<a href="http://s.tt/1gm3z">http://s.tt/1gm3z</a>)</p> </div> <p>Our latest press release is hitting the stands all across the USA today, in preparation for the Fourth of July! Read on...</p> <h1 class="entry-title"> &nbsp;</h1> <h1 class="entry-title" id="story_headline"> Protect America&#39;s Beautiful Trees And Forests: Don&#39;t Move Firewood</h1> <div style="width: 1px; height: 1px; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font: 10pt sans-serif; text-align: left; text-transform: none; overflow: hidden;"> <br /> Read more here: http://www.sacbee.com/2012/06/29/4599567/protect-americas-beautiful-trees.html#storylink=cpy</div> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><i>Keep our country&#39;s natural heritage safe from invasive insects and diseases this Fourth of July</i></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Thousands of Americans celebrate Independence Day by heading to national and state parks, campgrounds, and forests to enjoy the outdoors. Many will bring along their own firewood for convenience - not realizing that bringing firewood from home poses a serious risk to the nation&#39;s forests by potentially spreading tree-killing pests. Many states, and several federal agencies, consider this risk severe enough to implement regulations restricting the movement of firewood, and in some places violations can come with a hefty fine.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&quot;The Fourth of July holiday is a time when we all remember what an amazing country we live in, and healthy trees and forests are integral to the beauty of our lands and waters,&quot; said Leigh Greenwood, <i>Don&#39;t Move Firewood</i> campaign manager, The Nature Conservancy. &quot;Tens of thousands of trees are destroyed every year by invasive tree-killing insects, and one of the most important steps everyone can take to protect our natural heritage is to stop moving forest pests to new areas on firewood. It&#39;s really that simple.&quot;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>In many states, regulations limit how far firewood can be legally transported, and some states prohibit the entrance of out-of-state firewood altogether. These regulations most frequently include prohibitions against moving firewood over 50 miles or over state lines, although some states have stricter limits in place. For example, some states prohibit movement of firewood to state parks or other state-managed lands from more than 25 miles away. Additionally, the USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has federal quarantines in many states on wood products (including firewood, wooden pallets, and other materials) that could harbor pests like the Asian longhorned beetle, emerald ash borer, and other damaging pests and pathogens.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&quot;We encourage everyone to help protect our country&#39;s natural resources from invasive species,&quot; said APHIS spokesperson Joelle Hayden.&nbsp; &quot;Taking basic steps &ndash; like not moving firewood and following federal and state quarantines &ndash; will help keep these dangerous pests from spreading unintentionally.&quot;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>More than 450 non-native forest insects and diseases are now established in the United States. While most can&#39;t move far on their own, many pests can hitchhike undetected on firewood, starting new infestations in locations hundreds of miles away. These infestations can destroy forests, lower property values, and cost huge sums of money to control. Over the last hundred years, introduced species of invasive insects and diseases have killed tens of millions of trees in forests, cities, and towns across the country. In addition to the Asian longhorned beetle and emerald ash borer, these tree-killing pests include Dutch elm disease, Sirex woodwasp, thousand cankers disease, hemlock woolly adelgid, sudden oak death, laurel wilt, and many others.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Following are tips from the <i>Don&#39;t Move Firewood </i>campaign:</p> <ul type="disc"> <li> - Take care to respect all state and local regulations on the movement of firewood and other unprocessed wood &ndash; some areas are subject to serious fines for violations. For more information, visit <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/the-problem/state-state-information/index.html" target="_blank">http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/the-problem/state-state-information/index.html</a>.</li> <li> - For a list of federal and state quarantine areas, visit: <a href="http://www.nps.gov/grsm/planyourvisit/quarantine-counties.htm" target="_blank">http://www.nps.gov/grsm/planyourvisit/quarantine-counties.htm</a>.</li> <li> - Obtain firewood near the location where you will burn it &ndash; that means the wood was cut in a nearby forest, in the same county, or a maximum of 25-50 miles from where you&#39;ll have your fire depending on state regulations.</li> <li> - Commercially kiln-dried wood is a good option if you must transport firewood.</li> <li> - If you notice an insect or tree disease you don&#39;t recognize, take a photo or obtain a specimen of it, and compare it to Web site photos of the suspected pest. A good resource to help in identification is: <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/gallery-of-pests" target="_blank">http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/gallery-of-pests</a>.</li> <li> - If you believe you have found a new outbreak of an invasive insect or disease, contact your state department of agriculture: <a href="http://www.rma.usda.gov/other/stateag.html" target="_blank">http://www.rma.usda.gov/other/stateag.html</a>.</li> <li> - Tell your friends and others about the risks of moving firewood &ndash; no one wants to be responsible for starting a new pest infestation.</li> </ul> <p>- To learn more about how to prevent forest pests from destroying forests, log onto <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/" target="_blank">www.dontmovefirewood.org</a>.</p> <div style="width: 1px; height: 1px; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font: 10pt sans-serif; text-align: left; text-transform: none; overflow: hidden;"> <br /> Read more here: http://www.sacbee.com/2012/06/29/4599567/protect-americas-beautiful-trees.html#storylink=cpy</div> <style type="text/css"></style> Pests in the News don't move firewood press release Fourth of July press release Mon, 02 Jul 2012 21:33:56 +0000 L. Greenwood 1401 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Construction waste as firewood http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/construction-waste-firewood.html <p>We&#39;ve talked about <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/what-about-burning-cut-pallets.html">burning cut pallets</a> before, but what about construction waste? As always, we&#39;ve got you covered.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Dear Don&#39;t Move Firewood,</em></p> <p><em>I work in construction and have access to large amounts of processed construction lumber fall off. Is it ok to bring some of that wood for campfires as it is no longer a tree in its natural form?</em></p> <p><em>Yours,</em></p> <p><em>Mark</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Dear Mark,</p> <p>There is sometimes a gap between a regulation, and every single possible thing that could apply to that regulation. Your question is regarding &quot;<em>processed construction lumber fall off</em>,&quot; so what I&#39;m envisioning is the little clean dry bark-free segments of 2x4 or similar dimensional lumber that get trimmed off so that the whole piece is the correct length. If that&#39;s right, then this sort of wood product presents a very minimal risk to tree health, and it would be OK in theory to use it for camping. However- and this is a BIG however- this sort of wood may still be either under regulation in your state, or may be turned away at the campground gate. The first thing- that it may be under regulation- is because the definition of untreated firewood varies a bit, and these scraps could be included. It isn&#39;t because they are the same, it is because of what I first said- the gap between a regulation and every single possible type of burnable wood product. Then, the second part is the campground issue. Some campgrounds will not permit the burning of scraps, pallets, or other construction types of wood. This is generally for worker safety, for fear of chemicals like arsenic, or sharp brackets that could be released in burning and cause injuries for maintenance workers.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>But this is untreated wood, you protest! And it doesn&#39;t have nails or brackets! I know, but just because yours is clean and safe doesn&#39;t mean everyone&#39;s is.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Anyway, the point that I&#39;m getting at is that processed lumber scrap is fine to burn in theory, but in practice it still may be forbidden in some areas, and in some campgrounds. I would advise checking with local regulations and calling ahead to the campgrounds. A little time on the phone can go a long way.</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates burning dimensional lumber burning pallents campgrounds firewood lumber scrap wood Thu, 28 Jun 2012 19:44:12 +0000 L. Greenwood 1400 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Why do we allow campfires in the first place? http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/why-do-we-allow-campfires-first-place.html <p>A tough question came into the advice column inbox about a month ago, and I&#39;ve been pondering it ever since.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Dear Don&#39;t Move FIrewood,</p> <p>What is the reason for allowing campfires in the first place?</p> <p>1. On the west side of the Columbia River in Washington State they allow fires in the forests.&nbsp; The forests burn up due to fires.&nbsp; On the east side of the Columbia in Douglas County fires are NOT allowed.</p> <p>2. Campfires make pollution and breathing in campground HORRIBLE at times.</p> <p>If people are serious about climate change ending campfires would bring the topic home and wake people up.&nbsp; Plus the bugs would not travel in firewood hauled around.</p> <p>Thanks in advance,</p> <p>Tom</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Dear Tom,</p> <p>To start off, your very first question is the easiest. Campfires are not always allowed at all campgrounds and forests, because sometimes they do create unacceptable risks. When these risks (like forest fires) are well understood by the public, then the regulation to not allow fires is usually fairly well respected. But when the risks aren&#39;t well understood by the public (like forest pests) or aren&#39;t well accepted by a wide range of the public (like contributing to climate change), the regulation will only serve to encourage rule-breaking and essentially create even more unacceptable behavior, such as creating illegal fire rings outside the boundary of the campground. So the reason for allowing campfires in the first place, usually, is that there is no persuasive, fair, or compelling reason to prohibit them.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>I agree that campfires create pollution, especially when people burn wet wood or during certain weather patterns. That&#39;s a great argument for occasionally banning campfires, when appropriate. Again, that&#39;d be understood by the public, so it would be likely to be respected.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>But I&#39;m going to disagree with the ideas you&#39;ve got at the end of your letter. I don&#39;t think acceptance of the issue of climate change is going to be furthered by antagonizing typical campers. Here at Don&#39;t Move Firewood, we draw a pretty bold line in the sand between the act of having a campfire, or having a wood stove, or even just burning wood as a concept, and the threat of forest pests. The spread of forest pests is caused primarily by bad practices and bad decisions- NOT by the campfire itself, or the wood stove, or whatever method is used to burn wood. We believe that education and cooperation is the key to success over time.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates burning ban climate change dear don't move firewood firewood ban forest pests Thu, 21 Jun 2012 17:30:52 +0000 L. Greenwood 1399 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Salvage logging after emerald ash borer? http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/salvage-logging-after-emerald-ash-borer.html <p>Invasive forest pests come in all different types- fungi, bacteria, beetles, aphids- and all the pests we talk about are united in the fact that they will eventually kill the tree they are infesting. But what happens next? What can you do with all that standing dead timber?</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Dear Don&#39;t Move Firewood,</em></p> <p><em>I have a question about the Emerald Ash Borer. What about these loggers who go in and buy up trees in your woods?&nbsp; If you have a lot of ash trees can they buy up those trees for the wood?</em></p> <p><em>Yours,</em></p> <p><em>Margaret</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Dear Margaret,</p> <p>Yes, in many cases, you could use a properly certified and permitted private logging operation to cut down the trees and use them for various purposes. In a quarantined area (whether a region, zone, or state) you&#39;d have to be extremely careful to ensure that they have a compliance certificate or other legal documentation showing that their plans for cutting and moving the wood was legal and appropriate. But with proper precautions and paperwork in place, you&#39;d be set to go. For instance, if you lived in an area with lots of ash trees, and there was a firewood producer with a kiln that meets federal certifications, you could even use it to make kiln dried firewood! Across the continent, wood harvested from areas with forest pests is used for lots of things; firewood, pellets, chips, log home timbers, and more. It is just a matter of taking the time and precautions to make sure you are doing it right, and not spreading forest pests.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Thanks for asking.</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates Emerald ash borer firewood forest pests loggers salvage logging Thu, 07 Jun 2012 21:47:20 +0000 L. Greenwood 1397 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Yes! You've got it! http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/yes-youve-got-it.html <p>Ready for the best email we&#39;ve gotten in weeks? Maybe months?</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Dear Don&#39;t Move Firewood,</p> <p>Please clarify for me - if I live in Snohomish county, it&#39;s best to get my firewood in Snohomish county? Also, I should not bring this firewood to a campsite out of my county? Thank you!</p> <p>Yours,</p> <p>Kathryn in Washington</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Dear Kathryn-</p> <p>Yes! That&#39;s exactly right. Exactly!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>I bet you didn&#39;t know that the Viburnum Leaf Beetle, a major pest originally from Europe, is found in your county. And not knowing that is fine. It actually completely supports the idea that you and everyone else in the world doesn&#39;t need to know about each pest, each infestation, and each type of affected tree and shrub. You just need to know EXACTLY what you&#39;ve said in your email- that wood should be burned near its origin, preferably never leaving the county or nearby region. Ideally, firewood and other untreated wood products should travel under 50 miles- and better closer to 25 or 10 miles whenever feasible.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Other insects like the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug are found in the Pacific Northwest, and can hitchhike in firewood or brush. And have you heard of Sudden Oak Death? It is a really bad tree killer, found around Northern California and limited areas of Southern Oregon. You certainly wouldn&#39;t want to risk spreading that by buying untreated (and likely illegally transported) firewood from that region. But you don&#39;t need to know about these things, really. Just stick to the basics- exotic and damaging beetles, diseases, stink bugs... they can spread on firewood, unseen, unknown. So buy it where you burn it, and thanks for writing in!</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates firewood pest alert snohomish county viburnum leaf beetle washington Mon, 04 Jun 2012 19:42:25 +0000 L. Greenwood 1396 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Memorial Day press release! http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/memorial-day-press-release.html <p>Our Memorial Day preparations have begun, with our national press release heading out into the world yesterday. Read the whole thing here!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p align="center"><strong>VACATION SEASON BEGINS HIGH RISK PERIOD FOR SPREAD OF EMERALD ASH BORER</strong></p> <p align="center"><em>Deadly invasive insect has been discovered in 15 states and poses a threat to many others</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;As Memorial Day kicks off the vacation and camping season, another summer event takes place: adult emerald ash borers emerge from ash trees to mate and lay eggs. These invasive tree-killing beetles can spread when moved to new locations in contaminated firewood by vacationing Americans. Often described as one of the most destructive insects to ever invade this country, the emerald ash borer has killed tens of millions of ash trees in the Midwest and Mid-Atlantic states, and is a threat to all ash trees nationwide.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The emerald ash borer is originally from Asia and most likely first arrived in North America in infested wood packaging crates and pallets. Because it&rsquo;s a non-native species, American and Canadian trees have no evolved resistance to its attacks, and it has no effective native predators. The beetle was first discovered in the United States in 2002 in southeastern Michigan. Since that time, EAB infestations have been detected in Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Maryland, Minnesota, Missouri, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and the Canadian provinces, Ontario and Quebec.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The beetles usually emerge in late May and early June, making early summer the most critical time for everyone to be aware of what the emerald ash borer looks like. Once the emerald ash borer has infested a tree, the larvae carve shallow tunnels under the bark, disrupting the tree&#39;s ability to transport water and nutrients. These tunnels, called galleries, are what eventually kill the tree.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&ldquo;Because the emerald ash borer larvae feed under the surface of the bark, a visual inspection will often not detect them,&rdquo; said Leigh Greenwood, <em>Don&rsquo;t Move Firewood</em> campaign manager, The Nature Conservancy. &ldquo;When people take firewood with them on their camping and hiking vacations, they can unknowingly transport these or other damaging pests. It might seem harmless to pack a few pieces of seasoned firewood along with your gear, but it&rsquo;s not. We ask people to leave their firewood at home. Buy firewood where you&rsquo;ll burn it.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The emerald ash borer, Asian longhorned beetle, and many other invasive insects&rsquo; spread is aided by the movement of firewood. Firewood is implicated in dozens of forest pest infestations found in or near campgrounds, including infestations in Massachusetts, Missouri, Ohio, Indiana, and West Virginia.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&ldquo;There are an estimated eight billion ash trees of various species in the United States, found in almost every state, all of which are vulnerable because of the spread of the emerald ash borer,&rdquo; said Faith Campbell, senior policy representative at the Conservancy. &nbsp;&ldquo;At a policy level, we need stronger regulations in place to help prevent the entry of these types of destructive pests into the country; however, once they are here, regulations and voluntary actions intended to curtail human movement of the pests is one of our greatest hopes for slowing the spread.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Many states have quarantines on the movement of firewood, with rules varying greatly according to local jurisdictions and pest situations. In many states, regulations limit how far firewood can be legally transported and some states prohibit the entrance of out-of-state firewood altogether. &nbsp;Additionally, the USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has federal quarantines in affected states to prevent the movement of pests like the Asian longhorned beetle, emerald ash borer, sudden oak death, and other damaging pests and pathogens.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&ldquo;The state and federal quarantines are in place to help protect our country&rsquo;s natural resources from invasive species like the Emerald Ash Borer,&rdquo; said APHIS spokesperson Joelle Hayden. &nbsp;&ldquo;As we move into the summer travel season, we encourage everyone to take basic steps like not moving firewood and following the quarantines to help keep this pest from spreading unintentionally.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Following are tips from the <em>Don&rsquo;t Move Firewood </em>campaign:</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <ul> <li> If you don&rsquo;t want to keep your firewood until next winter, don&rsquo;t be tempted to take it along on any road trips. Instead, you can give it to your next-door neighbor, burn or chip it on site, or dispose of it locally.</li> <li> Keep in mind that even though the wood may look clean and healthy, it could still harbor tiny insect eggs or microscopic fungal spores that could start a new and deadly infestation of forest pests.</li> <li> Obtain firewood near the location where you will burn it &ndash; that means the wood was cut in a nearby forest, in the same county, or a maximum of 25-50 miles from where you&#39;ll have your fire depending on state regulations.</li> <li> Aged or seasoned wood is not considered safe to move, but labeled and commercially kiln-dried wood is a good option if you must transport firewood.</li> <li> If you have already moved firewood, and you need to dispose of it safely, burn it soon and completely. Make sure to rake the storage area carefully and also burn the debris. In the future, buy from a local source.</li> </ul> <ul> <li> Take care to respect all state and local regulations on the movement of firewood and other unprocessed wood &ndash; some areas are subject to serious fines for violations. For more information, visit <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/the-problem/state-state-information/index.html">http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/the-problem/state-state-information/index.html</a>.</li> <li> For more information about federal quarantines in the states where the emerald ash borer has been found, please go to: <a href="http://www.emeraldashborer.info/">http://www.emeraldashborer.info/</a>.</li> <li> If you notice an insect or tree disease you don&rsquo;t recognize, take a photo or obtain a specimen of it, and compare it to Web site photos of the suspected pest. A good resource to help in identification is: <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/gallery-of-pests">http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/gallery-of-pests</a>.</li> <li> If you believe you have found a new outbreak of an invasive insect or disease, contact your state department of agriculture: <a href="http://www.rma.usda.gov/other/stateag.html">http://www.rma.usda.gov/other/stateag.html</a>.</li> </ul> <ul> <li> Tell your friends and others about the risks of moving firewood &ndash; no one wants to be responsible for starting a new pest infestation.</li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Pests in the News don't move firewood press release firewood press release memorial day Wed, 23 May 2012 17:40:39 +0000 L. Greenwood 1384 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Visitors to Great Smokey Mountains National Park http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/visitors-great-smokey-mountains-national-park.html <p>The National Parks Service contains some of the most diverse landscapes imaginable, and of course each Park or Monument deserves the right to choose how they protect their heritage from invasive species threats. Don&#39;t Move Firewood thinks it is smart to keep visitors from bringing firewood into the parks, especially if those visitors are coming from known high risk areas. With that in mind, we want to give a big shout out to the Great Smoky Mountains National Park for their very easy to read list of <a href="http://www.nps.gov/grsm/planyourvisit/quarantine-counties.htm">quarantined counties</a>, accurate as of May 2012, to educate people on where firewood is absolutely prohibited by arriving with visitors from that county. Nice job! It makes it really easy for us to answer this recent question in our advice column;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Dear Don&#39;t Move Firewood,</em></p> <p><em>We live in Blount County (TN). <a href="http://www.nps.gov/grsm/planyourvisit/cadescove.htm">Cades Cove</a> (valley within Great Smoky Mountains) is in Blount County.&nbsp; Can we take our fire wood?</em></p> <p><em>Yours,</em></p> <p><em>Dorothy in Tennessee</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Dear Dorothy,</p> <p>Because Blount County is on the list of <a href="http://www.nps.gov/grsm/planyourvisit/quarantine-counties.htm">quarantined counties</a>, even though your destination is in the same county, you still can&#39;t take firewood with you into Great Smoky Mountains National Park. I know that&#39;s a little confusing, but the idea is that there are extra precautions in place to keep pests like the emerald ash borer out of the National Park. Thanks for asking, and enjoy your trip!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates dear don't move firewood firewood great smoky mountains national park national park service Wed, 23 May 2012 17:35:24 +0000 L. Greenwood 1383 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Do you send DVDs to Turkey? http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/do-you-send-dvds-turkey.html <p>Fun question today for our advice column...</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Dear Don&#39;t Move Firewood</em></p> <p><em>I would like to request a free DVD of yours. In the form page, I can not select my country. I&#39;m from outside of US. If it is possible, would you please send me a copy?</em></p> <p><em>Yours, </em></p> <p><em>Ozgehan from Turkey</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Dear Ozgehan,</p> <p>We don&#39;t send our DVD overseas, so I&#39;m afraid the answer is no. Instead of watching our videos on DVD, you could simply watch them on <a href="http://www.YouTube.com/dontmovefirewood">YouTube.com/dontmovefirewood</a>, or you can download them for free from the <a href="http://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/dont-move-firewood/id418097077">iTunes store</a>. As an important side note, we do send out materials to Canada and Mexico in limited quantities- but Turkey is out of our range.Thanks for asking!</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates dear don't move firewood don't move firewood DVD firewood videos Mon, 21 May 2012 22:02:22 +0000 L. Greenwood 1382 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Shorthand from New Hampshire http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/shorthand-new-hampshire.html <p>Great and short inquiry this week from the Granite State!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Dear Don&#39;t Move Firewood,</em></p> <p><em>Living in N.H. and would like to know if you have your own trees from yard cut down can we bring them to our campground in N.H.?</em></p> <p><em>Yours,</em></p> <p><em>Marilyn</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Dear Marilyn,</p> <p>As I read it, your question is &quot;if you live in New Hampshire, and you cut down a tree in your own backyard to make firewood, can you then take that firewood to a campground that is also in New Hampshire?&quot; I have two answers; one from me, and one from Laura Beard, NH Forest Pest Outreach and Survey Project Coordinator. Let&#39;s start with her answer!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Laura says, &quot;New Hampshire&#39;s firewood quarantine is an exterior quarantine, so you cannot transport firewood&nbsp;<u>into</u>&nbsp;the state. &nbsp;If you are moving firewood&nbsp;<u>within</u>&nbsp;the state, you are fine. &nbsp;You can always refer to the NH Department of Agriculture&#39;s Firewood Quarantine website- <a href="http://agriculture.nh.gov/divisions/plant_industry/firewood-quarantine.htm%20">http://agriculture.nh.gov/divisions/plant_industry/firewood-quarantine.htm </a>&nbsp;Thank you so much for being aware and vigilant about this!&quot;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>OK, but here is where I respectfully disagree. Even though it is not illegal, or against any state regulations, in my opinion it isn&#39;t a good idea to move firewood very far <u>even within</u> the state of New Hampshire. Did you know that New Hampshire is 180 miles tall? That&#39;s far. It would take over 60 years for the natural spread of a pest like emerald ash borer to cross your whole state... or just one long afternoon in your pickup truck on the way to a campsite. So yes, if you are moving firewood from your yard to a campsite that is just 10 miles away, then that&#39;s not a big deal. But if you are taking it from Nashua to Berlin, I personally thing that is not a wise choice.&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates don't move firewood firewood how far to move firewood New Hampshire Thu, 10 May 2012 20:37:24 +0000 L. Greenwood 1380 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org All the right questions http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/all-right-questions.html <p>I&#39;m not sure how this ended up in my inbox, but I&#39;m so glad they asked...</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Dear Don&#39;t Move Firewood,</em></p> <p><em>If we can&#39;t bring firewood can we purchase firewood there at the camp site and how much do we get at what price? i have reserved a place for a week and i need to know what it will take to have a fun and enjoyable birthday weekend camping and fishing.</em></p> <p><em>Yours,</em></p> <p><em>Lewis</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Dear Lewis,</p> <p>These are great questions! I want to highlight how smart you are- you obviously saw that you can&#39;t bring firewood to the campsite where you registered, so you are planning ahead. That&#39;s awesome. This is EXACTLY what everyone should do, with one exception, in that you accidentally emailed the wrong person. But I&#39;m not trying to poke fun, I swear. Everyone makes mistakes. Good luck, and thanks!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Note to blog readers; we are emailing Lewis today personally to let him know of his error so he can contact his actual campsite.</em></p> <p><em>&nbsp;<img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/images/firewoodsmall.JPG" style="width: 154px; height: 116px;" /> </em></p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates Thu, 03 May 2012 16:46:30 +0000 L. Greenwood 1378 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org On pesticides and prevention http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/pesticides-and-prevention.html <p>An interesting question popped into my inbox this weekend, about prevention from insect infestations, and use of pesticides.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Dear Don&#39;t Move Firewood,</em></p> <p><em>I lost several ash trees to pests this last couple seasons here in n.w. Ohio. I am concerned about a large maple tree. Nothing visible yet but as a precaution I wonder if a treatment of Lambda-cyhalothrin would be in order. It is a product that has worked well on the beetle (lady bug). Your thoughts would be appreciated.</em></p> <p><em>Yours, </em></p> <p><em>Roger in Ohio</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Dear Roger,</p> <p>I&#39;m sorry to hear about your ash trees. I don&#39;t know if they were killed by the emerald ash borer specifically, but I know that the EAB has a lot of infested areas in Northwest Ohio, so it seems likely. What may make you feel better is that your maple tree is not under immediate, urgent, threat from the Asian longhorned beetle, which is present in limited pockets near Cincinnati. Of course, that&#39;s a different part of Ohio from where you live. Therefore the preventative use of pesticides, such as you mention, is likely to be a waste of your money in this context.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>However, in general, we here at Don&#39;t Move Firewood don&#39;t have expertise in these things- that&#39;s what a licensed, experienced, and knowledgeable tree care expert should do for you. For all I know, there are native insects that you might be facing in your part of Ohio, and judicious use of pesticides to save your favorite tree could be in order. While researching your question, I came upon an excellent short impartial guide to helping you make a decision on hiring a tree care professional (visit <a href="http://www.emeraldashborer.info/hiringtreeco.cfm">Hiring a Tree Care Company</a>). I highly advise that you find a reputable and well regarded tree care professional in your area to help you with your treatment (or not) of your maple tree.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Good luck! And please, don&#39;t move any of the wood from your dead ash trees!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates Tue, 01 May 2012 17:01:07 +0000 L. Greenwood 1377 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Arbor Day is around the corner http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/arbor-day-around-corner.html <p>With Earth Day festivities winding down, Don&#39;t Move Firewood is gearing up for one of our favorite days of the year- Arbor Day! To celebrate, we are putting out a news release with lots of great advice for how to care for the trees in your life, and protect them from forest pests. Enjoy...</p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p align="center"><strong>&nbsp;ARBOR DAY: PLANT NEW TREES AND SAFEGUARD OLD TREES</strong></p> <p align="center"><em>Tree-killing insects and diseases are cutting short the lives of trees at a high cost to Americans</em></p> <p align="center">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>ARLINGTON, VA</strong>&mdash;April 23, 2012 &ndash; On April 27, millions of Americans will observe Arbor Day by planting new trees. While planting trees is important to the well-being of our forests, it is just as critical to learn how to protect both new and older trees from damage by invasive insects and diseases. The death of large, mature trees due to these pests can be devastating to neighborhoods, parks, and natural areas.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>When Julius Sterling Morton declared the first Arbor Day in 1872 in Nebraska, he was ahead of his time in understanding the value of trees. According to the U.S. Forest Service, a 20-year-old tree providing shade on private property can return to the homeowner an average of $102 in annual energy savings, while only costing $15 to plant and maintain. A public tree that same age, such as the ones you find on your street, returns $96 in annual energy savings, storm water runoff reduction, cleaner air, higher property values, and other benefits for every $36 spent on planting, mulching, pruning, and other care. Over its lifetime, a large tree in the U.S. Northeast, for example, will provide almost $6,000 in these benefits.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>In addition to the monetary value trees provide, a poll conducted by The Nature Conservancy found that 95 percent of the public consider trees to be an important part of the character and quality of life where they live, and that 93 percent are concerned about the insects and diseases that kill trees.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&ldquo;Unfortunately, tens of thousands of trees are destroyed by invasive tree-killing insects and diseases every year,&rdquo; said Leigh Greenwood, <em>Don&rsquo;t Move Firewood</em> campaign manager, The Nature Conservancy. &ldquo;On Arbor Day, if everyone makes a commitment to take simple steps, like not moving firewood when they travel or camp, we can work together as a nation to save both newly planted and already existing trees from being lost from our roadsides, backyards, and natural areas.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The dangers of exotic forest pests in North America first became evident in the late 1800s with the arrival of white pine blister rust on infested pine seedlings as well as the accidental introduction of the hardwood-loving gypsy moth. Chestnut blight soon followed, and this blight spread rapidly across the continent, killing millions of mature chestnut trees. Over the last hundred years, other introduced species of invasive insects and diseases have killed tens of millions of trees in cities, towns, and forests across the country. These tree-killing pests include Dutch elm disease, Asian longhorned beetle, emerald ash borer, thousand cankers disease, hemlock wooly adelgid, sudden oak death, Sirex woodwasp, and many others.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&ldquo;Prevention by everyday citizens is the key to averting widespread devastation of urban and backyard trees as well as wild forests,&rdquo; said Greenwood. &ldquo;Many of these insects and diseases can only be stopped by destroying the trees that are infested &ndash; a necessary but undesirable method that is most clearly tragic when entire neighborhoods lose their precious tree cover.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Arbor Day tree protection tips:</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <ul> <li> Buy your trees and plants from a reputable source, and purchase certified, pest-free nursery stock whenever possible.</li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> <ul> <li> Tree-killing pests can be found in a variety of wood products. Most problematic are firewood, brush, yard waste, tree debris, and re-used wood packaging material. Avoid the long-range movement of these materials to help slow the spread of pests. Buy, use, and dispose of these wood products locally.</li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> <ul> <li> If you have been camping or hiking in a forested area, clean your equipment, boots, animals, and gear before returning home so not to spread unwanted forest pests or invasive plant seeds.</li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> <ul> <li> Obtain firewood near the location where you will burn it &ndash; that means the wood was cut in a nearby forest, in the same county, or preferably within 10 miles from where you&#39;ll have your fire. Take care to respect all state and local regulations on the movement of firewood and other unprocessed wood &ndash; some areas are subject to serious fines for violations. For more information, visit <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/the-problem/state-state-information/index.html">http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/the-problem/state-state-information/index.html</a>.</li> </ul> <p style="margin-left:.5in;">&nbsp;</p> <ul> <li> Be on the lookout for invasive pests, and if you notice an insect or tree disease you don&rsquo;t recognize, take a photo or obtain a specimen of it, and compare it to Web site photos of the suspected pest. A good resource to help in identification is: <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/gallery-of-pests">http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/gallery-of-pests</a>.</li> <li> If you believe you have found a new outbreak of an invasive insect or disease, contact your state department of agriculture: <a href="http://www.rma.usda.gov/other/stateag.html">http://www.rma.usda.gov/other/stateag.html</a>.</li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p align="center">###</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The Nature Conservancy is&nbsp;a leading conservation organization working around the world to protect ecologically important lands and waters for nature and people.&nbsp;The Conservancy and its more than one million members have been responsible for the protection of more than&nbsp;18 million acres in the United States and have helped preserve more than&nbsp;117 million acres in Latin America, the Caribbean, Asia and the Pacific. Visit us on the Web at <a href="http://www.nature.org/">www.nature.org</a>.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>To learn more about how to prevent forest pests from destroying forests, log onto <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/">www.dontmovefirewood.org</a>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates Mon, 23 Apr 2012 14:38:35 +0000 L. Greenwood 1376 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Why we share our costumes http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/why-we-share-our-costumes.html <p>Don&#39;t Move Firewood offers a lot of free goods and services to anyone doing education or outreach about the hazards of spreading pests on firewood. We give away tens of thousands of our materials each year, create dozens of custom posters for various state and local entities, and serve as a focal point for the efforts of many campaigns that need a centralized and accurate website to anchor their outreach messaging. But their is one thing we do that is almost free, very effective at reaching the public, and really funny- and that&#39;s our costume share program.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Through the last five years, we&#39;ve needed to acquire two bug costumes (emerald ash borer and Asian longhorned beetle) and a costume that looks like a piece of firewood for our use in making educational videos. And during the mid-summer months, we use those costumes at our own outreach events, like farmers markets and music festivals. But the rest of the year, instead of being ensconced in mothballs, those costumes are available to anyone that asks- for nearly free. We merely ask that anyone that wants it for an outreach event must cover the cost of shipping and insurance. So where do our costumes go from September to May? And what do they do?</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Parades in New York and Thunder Bay, Canada. Landscaping Expos in Massachusetts and Colorado. Campground fireside chats in New Hampshire. This fall, our EAB costume is already booked for the World Championship of Little League in PA- especially appropriate because of the threat to ash trees and baseball bats.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>We share our costumes because we are constantly trying to think of the best (and most cost effective) way to share every aspect of our campaign across all of North America. Do you have a need for an emerald ash borer costume? Asian longhorned beetle costume? Or our very funny firewood costume? Email us at <a href="mailto:info@dontmovefirewood.org">info@dontmovefirewood.org</a>, and describe your dates needed, costume preference, and what event(s) it would be for, and we&#39;ll see if it is available. Resources as quirky and cool as bug costumes are meant to be shared.</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates Thu, 19 Apr 2012 18:41:47 +0000 L. Greenwood 1375 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Bringing wood into National Parks http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/bringing-wood-national-parks.html <p>From Acadia to Yosemite, as camping seasons approaches, a lot of folks are going to want to bring firewood into the National Parks. And informed people are probably going to be thinking, &quot;Is this legal? Is this a good idea?&quot; Well, here we go!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Dear Don&#39;t Move Firewood,</em></p> <p><em>I will be camping in Acadia in August,on the way there I will be visiting relatives in New Harbor ME. Am I able to bring firewood from Pemaquid Point into Acadia?&nbsp; </em></p> <p><em>Thank you,</em></p> <p><em>Toby</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Dear Toby,</p> <p>Excellent question- you bring up three crucial points in this simple idea.</p> <p>1) Is the within-state movement of wood from &quot;Pemaquid Point into Acadia&quot; too far? Or is it OK?</p> <p>2) Can within-state wood be brought into National Parks?</p> <p>3) Can within-state wood go into Acadia, specifically?</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>So let&#39;s do this one at a time</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>1) Is Pemaquid Point into Acadia National Park too far?<strong> Simple answer; Too far</strong>. I asked Google Maps, and the road distance is listed as 119 miles. As the coastline of Maine is quite convoluted, with the roads being very twisty, I&#39;ll allow that maybe as the bug flies it is more like 80 miles. That&#39;s still far more than the recommended upper limit (50 miles) for within-state movement of firewood. The 50 mile limit is our rule of thumb here at Don&#39;t Move Firewood, and it is also what the Maine Forest Service uses on its website (<a href="http://www.maine.gov/firewood">maine.gov/firewood</a>).</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>2) Can within-state wood be brought into National Parks? <strong>Complicated answer; Really depends on the park.</strong> For instance, <a href="http://www.nps.gov/yose/planyourvisit/campregs.htm">Yosemite</a> discourages firewood from more than 50 miles away, while <a href="http://www.nps.gov/grsm/planyourvisit/firewood-alert.htm">Great Smoky Mountains</a> has some very strongly worded regulations that prohibit the entrance of firewood from most places. The best advice I can provide is if you are coming from within 50 miles of the park, and feel strongly that you want to bring your own wood, then you should use the power of the internet to figure out if it is permissible or not. The best idea is to just leave it at home, of course.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>3) Can within-state wood go into Acadia, specifically? <strong>Simple answer; They want you to leave firewood at home.</strong> The <a href="http://www.nps.gov/acad/planyourvisit/campingregulations.htm">Acadia National Park website</a> says, &quot;Firewood brought in from other areas may contain non-native insect species that pose a serious threat to Acadia National Park&#39;s resources... <strong><em>Please leave your firewood at home.</em></strong>&quot; So that&#39;s a pretty strong statement. Park officials do not want you to bring firewood into the park.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>So Toby, here&#39;s your final answer. Pemaquid Point is too far away to safely bring firewood to Acadia. Also, Acadia&#39;s staff ask that you do not bring firewood. Therefore- please do not take firewood from your relative&#39;s place all the way to Acadia. Buy it in-park, or near the edge of the park, instead.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Thanks!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates Mon, 09 Apr 2012 17:10:56 +0000 L. Greenwood 1349 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org New scientific article about firewood movement http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/new-scientific-article-about-firewood-movement.html <p>&quot;Although only a limited amount of all transported firewood is likely to be infested by forest insects, this still represents a <strong>considerable increase in dispersal potential beyond the<br /> insects natural spread capabilities.&quot;</strong> <em>(emphasis added)</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>This quote is from the abstract of an excellent new scientific article, <em>Dispersal of Invasive Forest Insects via Recreational Firewood: A Quantitative Analysis</em>, in The Journal of Economic Entomology. I think the authors did an impressive job of showing how firewood movement by campers results in the very real spread of invasive forest pests. You can see the abstract at this link without being a subscriber <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1603/EC11270">http://dx.doi.org/10.1603/EC11270</a> , or if you are a member of BioOne Journal service, you can access a full PDF from that site.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Happy reading!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Fri, 06 Apr 2012 15:30:42 +0000 L. Greenwood 1348 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org No Mueva la Leña! http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/no-mueva-la-le%C3%B1.html <p>Tenemos <a href="http://www.nomuevalalena.org">un nuevo sitio en Espa&ntilde;ol! </a></p> <p><em>We have a new site in Spanish!</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="http://www.nomuevalalena.org">No Mueva la Le&ntilde;a</a> esta un projecto de Don&#39;t Move Firewood. Cuando nuestro amigos, <span class="short_text" id="result_box" lang="es"><span class="hps">compa&ntilde;eros de trabajo, </span></span><span class="short_text" id="result_box" lang="es"><span class="hps">o socios en la educaci&oacute;n necesita foletos, </span></span><span class="short_text" id="result_box" lang="es"><span class="hps">tatuajes falsos, un video, o otra materiales en Espa&ntilde;ol, </span></span><span class="short_text" id="result_box" lang="es"><span class="hps">por favor,</span> <span class="hps">venga a visitarnos</span></span>!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span class="short_text" id="result_box" lang="es"><span class="hps">Como siempre,</span></span><span class="short_text" id="result_box" lang="es"><span class="hps"> enviar un correo electr&oacute;nico</span></span> a <a href="mailto:info@dontmovefirewood.org">info@dontmovefirewood.org</a> si tiene preguntas o si necessita materiales. Hablamos Espa&ntilde;ol (un poquito) y estamos mejorando el sitio No Mueva La Le&ntilde;a cada dia!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Wed, 04 Apr 2012 21:16:50 +0000 L. Greenwood 1347 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org What about burning cut pallets? http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/what-about-burning-cut-pallets.html <p>Pallets, lumber, and other cut and dried scrap wood are indeed good to burn (as long as you are completely sure they were not treated with any chemicals such as arsenic or methyl bromide, which are very hazardous when burned). But are they ok to transport?</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Dear Don&#39;t Move Firewood;</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>I have a question about moving wood. I will be camping in NC this weekend and I was wondering if wood that has been kiln dried and milled is ok to transport? I have a source for old shipping pallets and would like to use those as firewood. Could there be any problems with using scrap lumber?</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Thanks,</em></p> <p><em>Tony </em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Dear Tony;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Great question. Old shipping pallets pose a few risks despite being dried and milled. For one thing, pests like the <a href="https://www.dontmovefirewood.org/gallery-of-pests/european-gypsy-moth.html">Gypsy moth</a> (which is found in NC and surrounding states) will lay their egg cases on nearly anything that is outside- so moving cut pallets that were stored outside for a few years very much risks moving that pest into your preferred camping area. Further, old pallets in particular stand a decent chance of having been fumigated in the past with the chemical Methyl Bromide. This is not a chemical you want to breathe- it is a known carcinogen- especially when you are trying to enjoy the fresh air of the great outdoors. Last but not least, sometimes campgrounds do not permit wood from the outside, especially scrap wood like this. Sometimes that&#39;s because of pest threats, and other times that for the reason of nails, brackets and staples injuring workers as they periodically clean fire pits.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>My advice is therefore that scrap wood and cut pallets can be burned at home if you are 100% sure they are not treated with wood preservatives or Methyl Bromide, but it still isn&#39;t wise to bring it camping.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Oh, and last but not least, laws vary hugely by state. You don&#39;t say where you are from, so I can&#39;t comment on if bringing wood into North Carolina from your starting location is illegal or not. But it might be. And that&#39;s not a good scenario!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Thanks for reading, and asking!&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates burn cut pallets burn pallets can I burn pallets methyl bromide pallet pallets Wed, 28 Mar 2012 17:39:28 +0000 L. Greenwood 1344 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org This is not an Asian longhorned beetle http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/not-asian-longhorned-beetle.html <p>We got one of our favorite types of questions here at Don&#39;t Move Firewood last week;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Dear Don&#39;t Move Firewood,</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>I was at the Flint Creek Dam (near Philipsburg Montana) in 2009 and an Asian longhorn beetle landed on my motorcycle. I thought it was pretty cool looking and took a photo of it but didn&#39;t know what it was until I saw a video my wife brought home.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>-Brian in Montana</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>So, here at Don&#39;t Move Firewood headquarters, I took a look at Brian&#39;s photo and discovered that sure enough, it looked like an ALB. So I emailed the image to a state official at the Montana DNRC, and she told me it was a native insect; the Pine Sawyer. Can you see how it is rough and speckled, not smooth and splotchy? And see that little white V on its neck? Those are clues to the fact that this is not an Asian longhorned beetle. Thanks to Amy Gannon, MT DNRC Forest Entomologist, now we know!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>So what should YOU do if you find an odd bug, and you aren&#39;t sure what exactly it is? Do what Brian did! Take a good picture, and ask someone about it. Call your State Department of Agriculture, or USDA APHIS office, or your DEC, DEQ, DNRC, etc etc. State officials will know to be on the lookout, and most will ask you to send them a photo or catch a bug in a jar and freeze it (that kills it humanely) for someone to investigate at a later date.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>For a list of potential contacts in your state or province, we have this quick resource; <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/report-an-invasive-pest.html">Report a Pest </a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Here&#39;s Brian&#39;s beautiful picture of a native Montana insect, the Pine Sawyer;</p> <p><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/images/Pine Sawyer.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 465px;" /></p> <style type="text/css"></style> Mon, 26 Mar 2012 20:22:07 +0000 L. Greenwood 1343 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org We are giving it all away!! http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/we-are-giving-it-all-away.html <p>Our first ever open season for tattoos, stickers, water bottles, and more is here! For a limited time (ending Friday March 30th) Don&#39;t Move Firewood is opening the floodgates for you, yes YOU, to request items from within our giveaway stocks!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Why? Why might you ask? Well, Don&#39;t Move Firewood always gives things away, year round. However, it seems like not everyone knows this service is available, nor do they know what we have to offer. To fix both these issues, for just a few weeks, we are giving away LOTS OF STUFF to anyone that requests it for a legitimate need. So far, we&#39;ve had college professors, nature centers, primary school teachers, and state agency staff request items. It is a great start! Keep them coming! We want to know who does outreach, how they plan to do it, and how many people they think they will reach. Ask nicely and you shall receive.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Please note that while we&#39;d love to send anything to anyone, of course we do have some limits. We can&#39;t send stuff to Canada or Mexico right now, and we can&#39;t send truly unlimited quantities. So just be honest with what you can productively use in your outreach efforts for 2012, and we&#39;ll do our best to help you out with what you ask for.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The form is here. Have at it! <a href="../../the-problem/what-you-can-do/become-collaborator/giveaways-request-form.html">http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/the-problem/what-you-can-do/become-collaborator/giveaways-request-form.html</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Fri, 23 Mar 2012 20:31:58 +0000 L. Greenwood 1342 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Hot off the virtual presses! http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/hot-virtual-presses.html <p>Our annual Spring Cleaning press release is ready for business! I hope we get a lot of coverage, and here it is in its entirety;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p align="center">&nbsp;</p> <p align="center"><strong>BEWARE OF UNWANTED GARDEN AND TREE PESTS DURING SPRING CLEANUP</strong></p> <p align="center"><em>Tree-killing insects and diseases can be spread when disposing of yard waste</em></p> <p align="center">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>ARLINGTON, VA</strong>&mdash;March 21, 2012&ndash;With the arrival of spring, homeowners and gardeners are beginning the task of cleaning up their yards and gardens to prepare for the growing season. Spring also can bring rain and wind, knocking down branches and trees weakened by ice or late winter storms. Gardeners, landscapers, and anyone working outside this spring need to know that tree branches, firewood, and cleared brush can harbor invasive insects and diseases, making proper use or disposal critical to preventing the spread of tree-killing pests.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>More than 450 non-native forest insects and diseases are now established in the United States. While most can&#39;t move far on their own, many pests can hitchhike undetected on firewood and brush, starting new infestations in locations hundreds of miles away. These infestations can destroy forests, lower property values, and cost huge sums of money to control. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, estimates for damage costs in urban areas for just one invasive pest, the Asian longhorned beetle, range from $1.7 billion for nine selected cities to $669 billion for the entire United States.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&ldquo;Even experts can&#39;t always detect a couple of pin-head size insect eggs or a few microscopic fungus spores hidden in wood; however, these tiny threats are enough to destroy an entire forest,&rdquo; said Leigh Greenwood, <em>Don&rsquo;t Move Firewood</em> campaign manager, The Nature Conservancy.&nbsp; &ldquo;Disposing of tree debris, brush, and other yard waste either on site or through municipal composting are the best ways that homeowners can prevent spreading tree-killing pests as they clean up their yards and gardens this spring.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Pest infestations can take years to be recognized by the authorities because sometimes trees appear healthy despite harboring harmful organisms. Many states have either regulations or quarantines relating to the movement of raw logs, unprocessed wood, or firewood. Depending on the types of problems present in a given state, these regulations might include cut firewood, raw logs under a certain length, high risk species of trees or brush, or other woody materials. &nbsp;Some of the invasive pests that have prompted both federal and state quarantines include the emerald ash borer, Asian longhorned beetle, gypsy moth, pine shoot beetle, sudden oak death, sirex wood wasp, and the hemlock woolly adelgid.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&ldquo;During the spring, people also can be on the lookout for signs of invasive pests as they work in their yards and gardens,&rdquo; said Greenwood.&nbsp; &ldquo;Although these insects and diseases can sometimes be difficult to detect, observant, concerned citizens are usually the ones who discover new infestations.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Tips for spring cleanup:</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <ul> <li> If you don&rsquo;t want to keep your firewood until next winter, don&rsquo;t be tempted to take it with you when camping, and don&rsquo;t bring it along on any road trips. Instead, you can give it to your next-door neighbor, burn or chip it on site, or dispose of it locally.</li> <li> Hire a tree service or rent a tree chipper to shred fallen trees and branches and brush into mulch for your own garden beds and landscaping projects.</li> <li> Many areas now offer a yard waste recycling program. Contact your municipal solid waste management department for information specific to your area.</li> <li> If a yard waste recycling or composting program is not available, and you cannot keep it on site, brush, logs, and branches should be disposed of in a local landfill.</li> <li> Take care to respect all state and local regulations on the movement of firewood and other unprocessed wood &ndash; some areas are subject to serious fines for violations. For more information, visit <a href="../../the-problem/state-state-information/index.html">http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/the-problem/state-state-information/index.html</a>.</li> <li> During your spring cleanup, if you notice an insect or tree disease you don&rsquo;t recognize, take a photo or obtain a specimen of it, and compare it to Web site photos of the suspected pest. A good resource to help in identification is: <a href="../../gallery-of-pests">http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/gallery-of-pests</a>.</li> <li> If you believe you have found a new outbreak of an invasive insect or disease, contact your state department of agriculture: <a href="http://www.rma.usda.gov/other/stateag.html">http://www.rma.usda.gov/other/stateag.html</a>.</li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p align="center">###</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p align="center">&nbsp;</p> <p>To learn more about how to prevent forest pests from destroying forests, log onto <a href="../../">www.dontmovefirewood.org</a>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The Nature Conservancy is&nbsp;a leading conservation organization working around the world to protect ecologically important lands and waters for nature and people.&nbsp;The Conservancy and its more than one million members have been responsible for the protection of more than&nbsp;18 million acres in the United States and have helped preserve more than&nbsp;117 million acres in Latin America, the Caribbean, Asia and the Pacific. Visit us on the Web at <a href="http://www.nature.org/">www.nature.org</a>.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Pests in the News brush don't move firewood municipal composting press release spring cleaning spring cleanup Thu, 22 Mar 2012 18:08:01 +0000 L. Greenwood 1341 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org What about big box stores? http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/what-about-big-box-stores.html <p><em>Dear Don&#39;t Move Firewood,</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>For this to work, you really need suppliers not to hike up their prices.&nbsp; Which I&nbsp; have run into, trying to be &quot;good&quot;&nbsp; Also, how come a place like Stop and Shop can sell wood from different states?</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Sincerely,</em></p> <p><em>Tim</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Dear Tim,</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>I agree. I hope that firewood dealers all across the nation are taking this not as an opportunity to make more money off of small bundles, but instead to increase the amount of wood they sell overall. But the key to this is demand- in order for firewood cutters and vendors to make enough money and keep their prices low, they need to have a lot of sales.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>As a regular person, what you can do to help is talk to the campground host or firewood dealer. Tell them that you think it is really important to keep the prices at a level that doesn&#39;t alienate the consumer. Change comes slowly, and don&#39;t forget to be courteous.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>In terms of your second question, the answer is that interstate commerce- even for firewood- is pretty well regulated. Therefore, for one state to receive firewood from another, there was probably some level of inspection of the product. Now, here at Don&#39;t Move Firewood we don&#39;t normally advocate for visual inspection of firewood because it is too tough, but in this case the assumption is that the firewood is from a reputable dealer that is certified and in compliance with all state and federal regulations. So the risk of that firewood containing pests is quite low- far lower than firewood you&#39;d cut from wood in your own backyard, or firewood from the back of some stranger&#39;s pickup truck on a country highway.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Just another episode of our advice column!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates big box stores expensive firewood firewood stop and shop Wed, 21 Mar 2012 21:53:12 +0000 L. Greenwood 1340 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Do you need brochures? http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/do-you-need-brochures.html <p>Firewood Outreach and Educational Specialists of North America! Are you listening? We have a lot of materials to help you engage with the public on the topic of forest pests and the movement of firewood. All you have to do is tell us how you are planning on using our materials, what sort of demographic group you will be interacting with (i.e. kids vs. adults from the general public&nbsp;vs. a Master Gardeners class) and give us an estimated number of what you need. From there, we work with you to send out the materials that best suit your needs.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Intrigued? We have brochures, posters, fake tattoos, frisbees, water bottles, and more. These things serve the purpose of getting people to talk to you, getting them to think, and in the end- getting them &quot;to buy it where you burn it, and don&#39;t move firewood.&quot;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Request materials by emailing us;&nbsp;info (at) dontmovefirewood DOT org. Make sure to include your parcel address, a good justification of where the materials will go, and an estimate of how many people you&#39;ll be interacting with. If you need things by a deadline (i.e. you want them a week before Earth Day) please indicate that specifically in the email.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Hope to hear from you soon...</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates brochures don't move firewood posters stickers tattoos Mon, 05 Mar 2012 21:56:06 +0000 L. Greenwood 1330 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Wood scraps- trash, or kindling? http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/wood-scraps-trash-or-kindling.html <p>Woodworkers all over the world use various types of hard and softwoods, and we recently got an excellent question about some&nbsp;small woodworking scraps...</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Dear Don&#39;t Move Firewood,</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>I am a hobbiest furniture builder in central PA, and have a large pile of kiln-dried oak and cherry cutoffs and scrap that I&#39;d like to get rid of. </em><em>These are clean, dry, bark free pieces ranging from shaving size to a few inches/side, and they have been stored indoors since coming out of the hardwood supplier&#39;s kiln.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>One option that I&#39;ve used in the past is to put them out with the trash (my local hauler takes them away for no additional charge).&nbsp; I presume they just end up in the landfill, destined to sit there for a very long time, since the low moisture content will inhibit decay.&nbsp; They will also allow me to compost the waste, for a significant fee.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Alternatively, I&#39;ve considered using them as kindling during my next camping trip, but apparently that may be running afoul of firewood transportation laws.&nbsp; It seems a shame to waste the energy stored in this wood by throwing it away, but I have no viable means of burning it on-site.&nbsp; What&#39;s your take on the situation?</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Yours,</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Chad in Pennsylvania</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Dear Chad,</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Your question perplexed me at first, because you are correct to think that kiln dried, bark free, and stored indoors wood poses no risk if you use it as kindling on a camping trip- but you are also correct that it&#39;d be a shame to run afoul of laws that might be too broad for your exact situation. So I asked a colleague in Pennsylvania to chime in- I wanted the real answer. Here&#39;s what Donald Eggen, Forest Health Manager for the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources,&nbsp;has to say;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <h4> There are no regulations regarding the movement of<strong> this type of wood </strong>within Pennsylvania.&nbsp; He can therefore use the material for firewood within the borders of Pennsylvania.&nbsp; However, if he wished to transport the wood across a state line to use as firewood in another state, he would have to check with that state&#39;s State Plant Regulatory Official to determine if he could transport the material into that state.&nbsp;</h4> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>I can guess that most people aren&#39;t likely to call a State Plant Regulatory Official just to move some kindling across state lines. But the reality is that you could be hit with a fine if you are violating any laws, or you could have it confiscated (where they&#39;d throw it away, which is a waste as you said). Pennsylvania is a pretty darn big state, so instead, I&#39;d just suggest using all that wood on in-state trips!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>And one last thing- the movement of raw wood by hobby woodworkers has been linked in the past to outbreaks of forest pests. I&#39;d like to just applaud you for buying kiln dried stock and storing it indoors. Those two steps minimize the risk of accidental pest movement on wood stock, and I&#39;m glad that&#39;s how you operate.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Thanks for asking!</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates dear don't move firewood firewood camping kindling scraps Fri, 24 Feb 2012 19:24:58 +0000 L. Greenwood 1329 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Maple Syrup Industry at risk! http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/maple-syrup-industry-risk.html <p>Perhaps no single food is as threatened by forest pests as is Maple Syrup. Today, Don&#39;t Move Firewood put out a press release to talk about how moving firewood threatens this delicious traditional food;</p> <p>----------------</p> <p>U.S. Maple Syrup Industry at Risk</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><i>The Asian longhorned beetle could put an end to an American staple at the breakfast table</i></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span class="xn-location">ARLINGTON, Va.</span>, <span class="xn-chron">Feb. 22, 2012</span> /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- As winter begins to wane, the maple sugaring season begins in the Northeast and the Midwest. The centuries-old tradition of tapping maple trees for sap to make syrup is threatened by the spread of the Asian longhorned beetle (ALB), which kills maple trees and travels on infested firewood. Because these beetles are not native to this continent, they have no effective natural predators, and native trees have no resistance to their tunneling and chewing.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>ALB infestations have occurred in several maple syrup-producing states. The most recent infestation, which threatens the Midwest, was found in <span class="xn-chron">June 2011</span> near <span class="xn-location">Cincinnati, Ohio</span>. Eradication efforts are underway, including the tragic but necessary removal of many mature maple trees. The infestation of ALB discovered in the <span class="xn-location">Worcester, MA</span> area in <span class="xn-chron">August 2008</span> poses a particularly serious threat to New England&#39;s maples, because of the large area the beetles had infested before being discovered. Earlier infestations of the beetle were found in both <span class="xn-location">New York</span> and <span class="xn-location">New Jersey</span>, but the beetle is believed to be under control in those two states. Throughout the region, state officials are vigilant for new infestations.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&quot;Because some people don&#39;t realize that moving firewood can spread this tree-killing beetle, more infestations may be discovered in other cities and towns in maple-producing areas,&quot; said <span class="xn-person">Leigh Greenwood</span>, <i>Don&#39;t Move Firewood</i> campaign manager, The Nature Conservancy. &quot;Once an infestation occurs, the only way to stop the Asian longhorned beetle&#39;s spread is to cut down all the infested and host trees &ndash; impacting property owners and local communities and posing a huge threat to the maple syrup industry.&quot;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>While these pests cannot move far on their own, when people move firewood that harbors them, they unwittingly enable these pests to start an infestation far from their current range. A visual inspection cannot easily detect these pests since they can be hidden in the layers of wood beneath the bark.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&quot;It might seem like a good idea to obtain some firewood from another area, or to take along firewood when going camping, but just one log can start a new infestation of the Asian longhorned beetle or other tree-killing pests,&quot; said Greenwood. &quot;By buying locally harvested wood, people can help protect their trees by not risking the accidental movement of insects and diseases that can affect entire forests.&quot;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&quot;Ongoing efforts in awareness and education about invasive insects and the Don&#39;t Move Firewood message are very important. We want to stress as an industry that the potential loss from Asian longhorned beetle will far exceed the upfront costs of prevention,&quot; said <span class="xn-person">Dave Chapeskie</span>, executive director of the International Maple Syrup Institute. &quot;Other invasive insects like the emerald ash borer threaten the integrity of the sugar bush, even if they don&#39;t directly threaten the sugar maples.&quot;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Following are tips from the <i>Don&#39;t Move Firewood </i>campaign:</p> <ul class="discStyle" type="disc"> <li> &nbsp;</li> <li> Obtain firewood near the location where you will burn it &ndash; that means the wood was cut in a nearby forest, in the same county, or a maximum of 50 miles from where you&#39;ll have your fire.</li> <li> &nbsp;</li> <li> Don&#39;t be tempted to bring firewood home just because the wood looks clean and healthy. It could still harbor tiny insect eggs or microscopic fungal spores that could start a new and deadly infestation of forest pests.</li> <li> &nbsp;</li> <li> Aged or seasoned wood is not considered safe to move, but commercially kiln-dried wood is a good option if you must transport firewood.</li> <li> &nbsp;</li> <li> If you have already moved firewood, and you need to dispose of it safely, burn it soon and completely. Make sure to rake the storage area carefully and also burn the debris. In the future, buy from a local source.</li> <li> &nbsp;</li> <li> Take care to respect all state and local regulations on firewood movement &ndash; some areas are subject to serious fines for violations. For more information, visit your state agricultural department&#39;s web site: <a href="http://www.rma.usda.gov/other/stateag.html" target="_blank"><u><font color="#0066cc">http://www.rma.usda.gov/other/stateag.html</font></u></a>.</li> <li> &nbsp;</li> <li> Tell your friends and others about the risks of moving firewood &ndash; no one wants to be responsible for starting a new pest infestation.</li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>To learn more about how to prevent forest pests from destroying forests, log onto <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/" target="_blank"><u><font color="#0066cc">www.dontmovefirewood.org</font></u></a>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The Nature Conservancy is&nbsp;a leading conservation organization working around the world to protect ecologically important lands and waters for nature and people.&nbsp;The Conservancy and its more than one million members have been responsible for the protection of more than&nbsp;18 million acres in <span class="xn-location">the United States</span> and have helped preserve more than&nbsp;117 million acres in <span class="xn-location">Latin America</span>, the <span class="xn-location">Caribbean</span>, <span class="xn-location">Asia</span> and the Pacific. Visit us on the Web at <a href="http://www.nature.org/" target="_blank"><u><font color="#800080">www.nature.org</font></u></a>.</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Pests in the News don't move firewood maple syrup press release Wed, 22 Feb 2012 21:48:26 +0000 L. Greenwood 1328 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Channeling firewood anger http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/channeling-firewood-anger.html <p>We got a particularly angry and frustrated entry in the Don&#39;t Move Firewood mailbox last week, which has been paraphrased below for clarity.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Dear Don&#39;t Move Firewood</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>I note the sign -- and also note that in my twice a week trips to and from Salem, NH -- that there is at least ONE sometimes TWO or more vehicles ... driving in front of me across the NH/ME bridge, and never even a slow down -- ignoring the sign.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>... They don&#39;t care.&nbsp;... There is NEVER anyone there to pull them over or stop the firewood from coming INTO THE STATE.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>...When is anyone going to actually STOP them and fine them and take that illegal firewood and burn it ?</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>... I NEVER see firewood going SOUTH across the ME/NH bridge...</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Yours,</em></p> <p><em>Frustrated in New England</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Dear Frustrated,</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>I completely agree that it is extremely annoying to see people driving around with firewood, ignoring the signs, potentially moving pests. Depending on how far they are going, and what state(s) they are in, they could be breaking some major laws and subject to fines. But clearly, much like many people that speed aren&#39;t given tickets, many people that move firewood are not caught.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>I want to directly address your actual question. &quot;When is anyone going to actually STOP them and fine them and take that illegal firewood and burn it?&quot; And the answer is that&nbsp;states in your area, most notably Maine, are doing that more and more, at their borders. I asked Ann Gibbs,&nbsp;Maine State Horticulturalist,&nbsp;to sum&nbsp;up what&nbsp;Maine does to stop&nbsp;firewood at the border, and here was her response;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <h5> The Maine Forest Service within the Maine Department of Conservation has conducted firewood exchanges during Memorial Day (2011), Labor Day and Columbus Day (2010) weekends for the past 2 years.&nbsp; Maine instituted a ban on untreated out of state firewood in 2010 and these firewood exchanges allow folks from other states to exchange the banned firewood for local firewood.&nbsp; Forest rangers conduct these exchanges at a rest area on the NH border which have been educational at this point, but they will have the legal authority to enforce the ban in the near future.&nbsp;</h5> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>So as one example, Maine is doing exactly what you would hope- using key times of the year to stop people and exchange firewood.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>And lastly, there&nbsp;is one big&nbsp;thing that YOU can do as a citizen; call or email&nbsp;your state department of agriculture and tell them that you are deeply concerned by firewood that you are seeing being moved in and out of the state. Tell they you think they should consider firewood check stations, and greater outreach programs. Be vocal on your opinions- but remember, budgets are tough, so the agency you call might indeed want to do more work but simply not be able to afford it.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Good luck- and please, channel those frustrations into action! Call your county extension, state department of agriculture, or other group today and tell them that you want more steps taken to slow the spread of pests!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates ask don't move firewood dear don't move firewood maine ME New Hampshire NH Fri, 17 Feb 2012 17:52:40 +0000 L. Greenwood 1232 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Our longest question ever, part two! http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/our-longest-question-ever-part-two.html <p>Continued from yesterday, our longest question ever!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Dear Don&#39;t Move Firewood, continued...</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>... Or is it just easier to keep hands off of anything where there are big commercial interests?&nbsp; I realize there is a need to make individuals aware of the consequences of their own actions, but I&#39;m always a bit skeptical when blame-the-consumer is the entire message and very little is said about holding corporations equally responsible for their actions.&nbsp; So, what is the research telling us?&nbsp; Is firewood transportation really responsible for most of the harm?&nbsp; Thanks.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Yours,</em></p> <p><em>Genny</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Dear Genny,</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Here&#39;s the breakdown</p> <ul> <li> <p><em>Or is it just easier to keep hands off of anything where there are big commercial interests</em></p> </li> <li> <p>I&#39;m gonna start arm waving here. Firewood <u>is</u> a big commercial interest, really. Some big dealers around the US and Canada do millions of dollars of business annually in the sale of packaged and bundled firewood. And they have huge capital investments in machinery and facilities. Firewood is a big deal. And these dealers face increasingly difficult patchworks of regulation, standards, and labeling needs. Many of them are putting huge amount of money in equipment upgrades to reach the newest heat treatment (kiln drying to proper temperatures) standards to allow for widespread interstate shipments.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Here at Don&#39;t Move Firewood, we applaud&nbsp;all the big dealers&nbsp;that are in compliance with state and federal heat treatment. They are doing the right thing for the health of our nation&#39;s forests. The demand for packaged wood is high, and the need for that wood to be appropriately heat treated is very real. We try to mention heat treated wood as an alternative option whenever it makes sense.</p> <p>When&nbsp;you are buying&nbsp;firewood that you cannot be sure is local, absolutely the next best thing is to look bundled or packaged firewood with a clear&nbsp;heat treatement label. &nbsp;There is no doubt that this product is safer and better for the environment than wood that has no heat treatment <u>and</u> has an unknown origin. Appropriately heat treated wood from across the country poses almost no pest risk at all- it is that simple.</p> </li> <li> <p><em>So, what is the research telling us?&nbsp; Is firewood transportation really responsible for most of the harm?&nbsp;</em></p> </li> <li> <p>The research is extremely clear; the spread of established forest pests is accelerated by the movement of firewood by everyday citizens. Left to their own wings, pests will spread under 5 miles- and&nbsp;many less than 1 mile, in a bug lifetime (usually one year). In contrast, you can drive across North American with a load of bug filled firewood in under a week. Pest outbreaks,&nbsp;most commonly of&nbsp;emerald ash borer,&nbsp;are often located in campgrounds- very clearly from camper-brought&nbsp;firewood. Urban outbreaks of Mountain Pine Beetle, a native species that has patchy outbreaks in native pines, are often traced back to someone cutting beetle filled wood in the forest and then bringing it back to their city lot to burn at a later date. The beetles crawl out and infest their neighbor&#39;s trees.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>But your question isn&#39;t &quot;some of the harm&quot; it is &quot;most of the harm.&quot; So I&#39;ll say this; the spread of forest pests has three main vectors once the pest is established; the pests themselves naturally spread very slowly, accidentally contaminated nursery stock spreads pests in a fairly controllable (and increasingly avoidable) way, and firewood spreads pests in a very widespread and difficult to control way.&nbsp;I&#39;m oversimplifying a&nbsp;little, but these are the biggest causes by far. Now, the nursery industry is quite proactive about this issue, and is constantly trying to improve their practices. They&nbsp;are working on it, and that&#39;s great. We here at Don&#39;t Move Firewood tackle the third angle, because somebody has got to get the word out!</p> </li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Thanks for reading, and Don&#39;t Move Firewood.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> ask don't move firewood dear don't move firewood firewood firewood advice column Thu, 09 Feb 2012 20:23:30 +0000 L. Greenwood 1224 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Our longest question ever, part one http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/our-longest-question-ever-part-one.html <p>Time for a two part installment series at Dear Don&#39;t Move Firewood, our occasional advice column.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Dear Don&#39;t Move Firewood,</em></p> <p><em>I am concerned about this focus on firewood.&nbsp; Shouldn&#39;t we be at least as concerned about wood packaging materials shipped from other countries?&nbsp; What about the giant lumber industry that hauls huge truckloads of wood around?&nbsp; Trucking huge numbers of Christmas trees out of state for sale is also a pretty big business in the Pacific Northwest each year.&nbsp; Has there been any serious examination of the potential for harm from these activities?&nbsp;... (to be continued)</em></p> <p><em>Yours,</em></p> <p><em>Genny</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Dear Genny,</p> <p>Let&#39;s break it down, because there is so much good stuff in&nbsp;here.</p> <ul> <li> <em>Shouldn&#39;t we be at least as concerned about wood packaging materials shipped from other countries?</em></li> <li> Yes! Of course! That&#39;s one of the primary pathways for pests to enter the US, Canada, and Mexico. And that&#39;s why Don&#39;t Move Firewood&#39;s&nbsp;parent group, the <a href="http://www.continentalforestdialogue.org">Continental Dialogue</a>, does&nbsp;extensive work on the issue of proper treatment of wood packaging. But here&#39;s the thing; that&#39;s not an issue for large scale public engagement and education, which is what Don&#39;t Move Firewood does. We have our speciality,&nbsp;our piece of the puzzle. Other people dedicate their effort to solid wood packaging standards.&nbsp;</li> <li> <em>What about the giant lumber industry that hauls huge truckloads of wood around?</em></li> <li> Again, Yes! Of course pests can spread in this way. What is interesting is that by and large, natural forests are not the point of initial introduction for most pests. Instead, urban and near-urban areas are more likely. Lumber industry relies mostly on natural, somewhat distant from cities, stands of trees. So just as a risk potential, the likelyhood for spread is lower. Additionally, the timber industry has various levels of inspection, standards, and certifications depending on the product, company, etc. So while this isn&#39;t a perfect system, there are aspects in place that further mitigate risk. Lastly, again, this isn&#39;t an issue that everyday citizens can best spend their time engaging with. Don&#39;t Move Firewood wants to help the average person do their part, and not ask them to do comparitively futile things for a single person to engage with&nbsp;(like confront the timber industry on their harvest practices).</li> <li> <em>Has there been any serious examination of the potential for harm from (christmas tree farming) activities?</em></li> <li> Every year, here at Don&#39;t Move Firewood we talk about christmas trees. Our message (which you can <a href="http://dontmovefirewood.org/holidaygreenery">see here</a>) is that you should either cut down your own local tree, or buy from a reputable dealer that is in compliance with State Department of Agriculture and/or USDA APHIS standards. Which is to say, buy from a well known and legal dealer, not a guy selling trees on the side of the highway. Lastly, <a href="http://dontmovefirewood.org/blog/disposing-your-christmas-tree.html">dispose of your trees</a> either in municipal composting, or in the trash (landfill) and never put them in your backyard brush pile. In the off chance that pests are in those discarded Xmas trees, you want them isolated from your backyard trees- not sitting underneath them all spring and summer.</li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>For the rest of the questions, I will return tomorrow!</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates dear don't move firewood firewood certification firewood industry firewood movement Wed, 08 Feb 2012 20:39:12 +0000 L. Greenwood 1223 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Your links, and our links http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/your-links-and-our-links.html <p>We are always happy to hear from our readers when our links are broken, or our map is wrong, or our information is out of date. Don&#39;t Move Firewood is a pretty big complicated effort and your aid is always welcome in keeping us accurate. However, I got an email over the weekend and it reminded me that I should emphasize that we are non-profit, and thus we cannot endorse any for-profit entities. Even cool looking small businesses. Sorry!&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Dear Don&#39;t Move Firewood </em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Just wondering if you would maybe help me out bigtime and link to my blog <u>http://(removedlink).blogspot.com/</u> or any of the pages. I could put up a link to you if it helped or put up a page on don&#39;t move firewood.&nbsp;</em></p> <p><em>Any help would be greatly appreciated.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Thanks,</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Business Owner</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Dear Business Owner,</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Sorry, we can&#39;t. But you can link to our site if you want to. And thanks for thinking of us.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Sincerely,</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Don&#39;t Move Firewood</p> <style type="text/css"></style> google search links non-profit search term optimization Mon, 23 Jan 2012 16:31:23 +0000 L. Greenwood 1170 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org We don't sell firewood http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/we-dont-sell-firewood.html <p>While there are many good places to buy firewood on the web, we are not one of them...</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Dear Don&#39;t Move Firewood</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>I&#39;m interested in getting a cord of firewood delivered to&nbsp;Centerville within the next week or so.&nbsp; What are your prices and available delivery dates.&nbsp; Please let me know.&nbsp; Many thanks.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Yours,</em></p> <p><em>Steve</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Dear Steve-</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>We don&#39;t sell firewood, but I want to take this opportunity to talk about how to BUY firewood. You want a cord delivered to your house. You are worried about the delivery date and price. That&#39;s all great- but you should also be asking, &quot;Where is your wood from?&quot; If you are in Centerville, and the wood is from just over the town line into West Centerville, then it poses far&nbsp;less of a risk&nbsp;to your tree and forests than if the firewood was sourced far away. In fact, ideally, it should be 10 miles or less from your house- with 50 miles being the very farthest. There is nothing wrong with using the internet to find a firewood dealer- just ask the right questions and use common sense!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Yours,</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Don&#39;t Move Firewood</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>NOTE:&nbsp;The town names are changed in this blog post- but we really did get this question on our Contact Us form!</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> buying firewood cord firewood Wed, 18 Jan 2012 19:10:52 +0000 L. Greenwood 1154 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org A question about California and Arizona http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/question-about-california-and-arizona.html <p>We got a great question from a visitor over the New Years weekend. Here goes another episode of...</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Dear Don&#39;t Move Firewood,</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>I am moving from Central Arizona to Victorville California and have some firewood that was cut in Yavapai County.&nbsp; Can I bring it with me to use in my new home?</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Thanks,</em></p> <p><em>Richard</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Dear Richard,</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Please don&#39;t do this. While I&#39;m fairly certain that it isn&#39;t directly illegal, it is a really bad idea. There are too many possibilities for spreading&nbsp;pests, whether forest pests or other pests like fire ants, termites, you name it. You sure don&#39;t want to bring those to your new yard!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Did you know that the goldspotted oak borer, a pest in California that has already killed tens of thousands of oak trees, probably came from firewood brought from Arizona or perhaps Mexico? Yup- just that short hop across the Mojave and the little spotted beetle went from a mild mannered native insect&nbsp;to a rampant killer of hundred year old oaks.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The California border is pretty tightly controlled for agricultural pests. There is a good chance that even if you decide to bring it with you despite our advice, they could confiscate it at the border. It really isn&#39;t worth the trouble- I know you have good intentions, but please- leave it at your old place, and let the new owners enjoy it. You&#39;ll be doing yourself, and&nbsp;California, a favor.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates arizona ask don't move firewood California goldspotted oak borer Tue, 03 Jan 2012 16:54:47 +0000 L. Greenwood 1128 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Year of the Forest is coming to a close http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/year-forest-coming-close.html <p>Did you know it has been the International Year of Forests? All year? It has been, but the year is almost up. As we wind down 2011, I thought I&#39;d recommend&nbsp;our DMF visitors&nbsp;check out some of the cool resources at <a href="http://celebrateforests.com">celebrateforests.com </a>. In particular, I&#39;m fond of the <a href="http://celebrateforests.com/DonCheadle">great video by Don Cheadle</a>, the <a href="http://celebrateforests.com/photoblog">Photo blog</a>, and maybe most importantly, the photo contest! Enter your <a href="http://celebrateforests.com/node/514">cool photos here </a>before January 31st!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Wed, 28 Dec 2011 21:57:49 +0000 L. Greenwood 1114 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Disposing of your Christmas tree http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/disposing-your-christmas-tree.html <p>Now that Christmas has come and gone, let&#39;s talk about how that tree can be disposed of properly. Here are the do&#39;s and don&#39;ts of Christmas tree disposal.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>DO:</p> <p>Take advantage of<strong> any local Christmas tree recycling program</strong>. Usually this means curbside (with your trash) pickup of the trees during a set time period, or you drop the trees off at a central depot somewhere in your town or city. Look in your newspaper or check online (searching for &quot;Christmas tree recycling&quot; and then the name of your town, as in &quot;Christmas Tree Recycling Las Vegas&quot; usually works best) for options near you.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>DON&#39;T:</p> <p>Burn your Christmas tree in your fireplace or wood stove. Here at Don&#39;t Move Firewood we&#39;ve suggested this in years past, but in 2012 year we learned the sap from fresh trees can sometimes create a fire hazard in your chimney or vent piping. Sorry! While an outside bonfire is still technically OK if local laws allow, indoor burning isn&#39;t a good idea because of this safety concern.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>DON&#39;T:</p> <p>Set the tree out in a brush pile in your backyard. Pests, weed seeds, and tree diseases could emerge and contaminate your property.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>DO:</p> <p>Play it safe. If you can&#39;t find a local Christmas Tree Recycling program (best choice!), just take it to your local solid waste facility, dump, or landfill. While it might feel wasteful, this is actually a much better way to dispose of your tree when it comes to risking the spread of forest pests.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>For the full scoop, visit our <a href="http://dontmovefirewood.org/HolidayGreenery">Holiday Greenery </a>page!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Thanks for reading!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>&nbsp;(Newly updated 1/3/2014)</em></p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates christmas tree disposal christmas tree recycling christmas tree throw away Forest Tue, 27 Dec 2011 22:00:50 +0000 L. Greenwood 1113 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Watching it snow, thinking about firewood http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/watching-it-snow-thinking-about-firewood.html <p>It is snowing right now, here at Don&#39;t Move Firewood headquarters. I&#39;m working from home so I don&#39;t have to drive on the slick roads, and just beyond my laptop is my fireplace, and my Christmas tree. Both of these things are wonderful symbols of some of the best parts of winter- warm fires, friends and family, holiday cheer, gift giving.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>So what about me, the manager of Don&#39;t Move Firewood? Where do I get my firewood? Where do I get my Christmas tree? How do I keep the local forests safe while enjoying the season? I&#39;m proud to tell you.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Firewood for the house; I get all my firewood right now from my neighbor across the street. He had a tree come down last winter, and has more wood than he needs. I only burn firewood rarely because I live in a regulated airshed (i.e. I can&#39;t have a wood stove, to prevent excess air pollution).</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Christmas tree; Every year we go to the local National Forest with a permit and cut a tree. Less than 15 miles from my house, and the permit is merely $5. We also take advantage of the free drop-off for used christmas trees in our community. They get chipped and then mixed with other materials at a municipal compost facility.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>That&#39;s it. It isn&#39;t fancy. We use local materials and dispose of them safely. I hope all the readers of the blog can say the same, and most of all, enjoy the Winter Solstice today!</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Wed, 21 Dec 2011 18:00:56 +0000 L. Greenwood 1112 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org A question about biomass http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/question-about-biomass.html <p>Dear Don't Move Firewood's inbox received a&nbsp;really fascinating question today on the issue of forest health and biomass fuel.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Dear Don't Move Firewood,</em></p> <p><em></em>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>I know of many biomass power facilities transporting wood from great distances. These pests do survive the chipping process. Does your organization address this issue, which is far larger than individuals moving firewood?</em></p> <p><em></em>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Yours,</em></p> <p><em>Josh</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Dear Josh,</p> <p>First of all, I appreciate the challenge of such an interesting question. But to answer it well, I have to break it down into pieces.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>First off, you say, "I know of many biomass power facilities transporting wood from great distances." Now, I don't disagree with this at all, however, you should note that the wood typically used in biomass facilities is from natural stands i.e. national forests and similar. That kind of landscape is arguably less likely to have an infestation of invasive forest pests than, say, the urban/suburban landscape where more individuals will get firewood. Thus, transporting this type of wood is a less risky activity in general. So does it move great distances? If you say so, I believe you. Is that a huge problem? Not as much as one might think because of the wood source. Also, as I've mentioned in the past, this kind of large scale wood movement is tracked and permitted in most states, allowing for accountability in the sourcing. Firewood is very often not tracked or permitted.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Next, you say, "These pests do survive the chipping process." And that is extremely, unequivocably, dependent on pest species. For instance; Asian longhorned beetles do not survive in even pretty big chips. In contrast, walnut twig beetles can survive in incredibly small chips. So I have to say, that's not a good line of logic to pursue in terms of the issue at hand. So let's just agree to disagree on that one.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Third, you ask, "Does your organization address this issue," and the answer to that is "No, although here we are&nbsp;talking about it right now." This site is about firewood movement. Is the only way that forest pests move via firewood? Of course not! They move on pallets. They move on nursery stock. They often can fly pretty far, or drift on the wind. But firewood&nbsp;is an important problem. If you, or anyone else, wanted to pursue ensuring that biomass plants only sourced their materials from a 50 mile radius, that'd be a really good idea from many perspectives. But that isn't our mission here. We focus on our firewood outreach as closely as we can.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Last but not least, "(<em>Biomass</em>) is far larger than individuals moving firewood?" I disagree. We are comparing apples to oranges. The sources of wood are typically different (national forest, state forest, etc vs homeowners and small woodlots). The distribution is different (limited regional&nbsp;placement of biomass plants, vs well over 150 million Americans using firewood every year). Lots of things are different about the two issues. I can't tell you if more firewood moves around per year than biomass moves around, but I can tell you this; every year, new pest infestations are found. They are very often&nbsp;found near campgrounds. I, thankfully, have yet to hear about a pest infestation tracked to a biomass facility.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Got questions? Dear Don't Move Firewood might have answers- or at least educated guesses. And if anyone knows of a pest infestation tracked back to a biomass facility, that'd be fascinating to hear about. Email us at info AT dontmovefirewood DOT org. &nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> biomass biomass boiler firewood hog fuel moving wood Wed, 02 Nov 2011 20:22:59 +0000 L. Greenwood 1105 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Storm debris strikes again http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/storm-debris-strikes-again.html <p>Remember Hurricane Irene, just a few months ago? Back then, we reminded all our Don't Move Firewood listeners of the importance of disposing of storm debris safely. Well, here we are again!&nbsp;After the unseasonably snowy&nbsp;weather&nbsp;along the East coast, please remember that any and all yard waste- from branches, to leaves, to full fallen trees- should be disposed of carefully.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>In some areas with particularly acute forest pest issues, this might mean using a certified contractor with a compliance&nbsp;agreement. This&nbsp;more stringent measure would be for areas like Worcester MA, or the&nbsp;ALB outbreak region in Ohio.&nbsp;If you are not in an area like that, the best thing to do is to dispose of wood on site (burn it in your own fireplace, or burn it outdoors typically with a permit)&nbsp;or bring it to a local compost facility or landfill.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Whatever you do, don't cut it up and bring it camping! And remember, not everyone knows about the issue of firewood movement, so please don't give it away on the roadsides to strangers. You are far better off giving it to local friends and neighbors less than 10 miles away.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Happy burning, and let's hope all the other snowstorms are a little more gentle on the trees.</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates cleaning up fallen trees nor'easter northeaster storm storm debris Wed, 02 Nov 2011 19:17:24 +0000 L. Greenwood 1104 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Dear Don't Move Firewood from Wisconsin http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/dear-dont-move-firewood-wisconsin.html <p>An alert citizen in Wisconsin posted a great question to Don't Move Firewood today;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Dear Don't Move Firewood,</em></p> <p><em></em>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>I own a farm in (town removed) Wisconsin and 40 acres of wood was blown down in the July storms. I would like to bring the oak to my home in&nbsp;(town removed) Minnesota&nbsp;to burn, is that alright to do?</em></p> <p><em></em>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Yours,</em></p> <p><em>Dan from&nbsp;Minnesota</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Dear Dan,</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>I hate to tell you, but this is a really bad idea on a&nbsp;two levels.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Most importantly in terms of a simple answer, it is often illegal to move hardwood firewood across state and county lines&nbsp;in this particular region of the country. I can't give you any firm legal advice because I don't know the route you'd take, and I'd hate to get you in trouble if I was wrong, but I must say this really puts you at a serious potential liability.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Secondly, this isn't a good idea because your farm is in the midst of a great sea of potential invaders. You probably know that oaks don't carry emerald ash borer (if they did, we'd name them emerald oak borer) but there are several species of both native and invasive insects in the midwest that do infest and kill oaks. Your worst nightmare is taking this wood from your place in Wisconsin- where unbeknownst to you it had some serious insect infestation- and bringing that infestation to Minnesota where it will destroy your trees, your property value, and potentially (eventually) all the trees for hundreds of miles.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>I know this sounds apocalyptic, but it isn't outlandish. It happens all the time with other pests, and of course nobody would ever do this on purpose.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>A much better thing to do is to use the wood on site in Wisconsin, or give it to neighboring residents or farms that are less than 10 miles away. You could take it as an opportunity to help the less fortunate, if you can donate the wood to a neighbor that really needs it.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Thanks for asking, and I'm sorry the answer is no- but like I said, it really puts you at risk to move that wood!</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates ask don't move firewood dear don't move firewood Minnesota Wisconsin Mon, 24 Oct 2011 17:48:01 +0000 L. Greenwood 1102 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Firewood law passes in Oregon http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/firewood-law-passes-oregon.html <p>Congratulations to the smart folks that worked tirelessly to pass a firewood&nbsp;preventative measure in Oregon! Starting in a little over a year, firewood that is sold in Oregon will need to either be from a neighboring state, or kiln (high heat) dryed and labeled. Here at Don't Move Firewood, we think this is a great step forward to protect the&nbsp;forests of the Pacific Northwest, and we'll be working to spread the word about this law- and any information how the preparation for implementation goes in 2012- as we learn more!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>To learn more, you can read this excellent short news article put out by the Oregon Department of Agriculture.</p> <p><a href="http://www.oregon.gov/ODA/news/111019firewood.shtml">http://www.oregon.gov/ODA/news/111019firewood.shtml</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Pests in the News firewood laws firewood movement oregon Thu, 20 Oct 2011 19:01:38 +0000 L. Greenwood 1101 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org California Press Release http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/california-press-release.html <p>The California Forest Pest Council has a press release out today, and I wanted to share it in its entirety because I think it is an excellent example of a collaborative group that is doing great preventative work. Nice job!<br><br /> News Release</p> <p><b>HELP KEEP CALIFORNIA FORESTS HEALTHY - KEEP FIREWOOD LOCAL</b></p> <p>Date: September 29, 2011</p> <p>SACRAMENTO--As part of a nationwide effort to encourage the public to buy and burn firewood locally, the California Firewood Task Force kicked off a public outreach campaign in September to inform campers, wood cutters, arborists, and the general public about the risks of long-distance movement of firewood.&nbsp; &ldquo;Firewood can carry insects and pathogens that may or may not be visible, making it impossible to know if you are transporting an invasive pest from one location to another when moving it.&nbsp; Once an invasive species is established in a new area, it can do a lot of damage environmentally and economically as the trees in those areas have no natural defenses to fight off pest attack,&rdquo; said Don Owen, chair of the California Firewood Task Force.&nbsp;</p> <p>The multi-pronged campaign includes surveying camper knowledge about invasive species and firewood in areas affected by the goldspotted oak borer (an invasive beetle in San Diego County likely brought into the state on firewood), providing firewood posters to campgrounds and parks for posting in public locations, mailing information to industry professionals, and offering educational Frisbees and playing cards to campers as a way to facilitate one on one interaction with campers while also providing them with useful information.&nbsp; &ldquo;As we increasingly become a global community, the movement of invasive pests and pathogens is becoming more frequent.&nbsp; Buying and burning wood locally is a simple way to help minimize the chances of spreading invasive species, and it is something everyone can do with little impact,&rdquo; continued Owen, &ldquo;The feedback gathered through the surveys will be useful for developing our long-term outreach campaign, helping us insure that we reach out to our audience as effectively as possible.&rdquo;</p> <p>Made up of state, federal, and local agencies as well as non-profit organizations, the California Firewood Task Force* was established in November 2010 by the California Forest Pest Council. <strong>For more information about the Task Force or keeping firewood local, go to <a href="http://www.firewood.ca.gov/">http://www.firewood.ca.gov</a> or contact Katie Palmieri at (510) 847-5482.</strong> </p> <p>###</p> <p>The California Firewood Task Force is made up of representatives from the California Agricultural Commissioners and Sealers Association, California Department of Food and Agriculture, California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, California Forest Pest Council, California Oak Mortality Task Force, California State Parks, Goldspotted Oak Borer Committee, National Park Service, University of California Center for Forestry, University of California Cooperative Extension, USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, and USDA Forest Service.</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Pests in the News California firewood goldspotted oak borer press release Thu, 29 Sep 2011 21:00:28 +0000 L. Greenwood 1100 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Video wins 2011 Yosemite Film Festival Silver Sierra Award http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/video-wins-2011-yosemite-film-festival-silver-sierra-award.html <p>Congratulations to the Don't Move Firewood video team! One of our latest videos, released this summer, has won a 2011 <a href="http://www.yosemitefilmfestival.com/">Yosemite Film Festival</a> Award, the Silver Sierra. To watch our newly award winning video, <a href="http://www.youtube.com/dontmovefirewood#p/u/3/Y1sYKntstFo"><strong>Super Rangers and the Legion of Bugs</strong>,</a> head on over to our YouTube site,<a href="http://www.youtube.com/dontmovefirewood#p/u/3/Y1sYKntstFo"> youtube.com/dontmovefirewood</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>And here is what the judges at the Yosemite Film Festival had to say about our film: "Our judges have determined that your project was among the very best of those they considered and is deserving of special recognition. Only select projects from each competitive category, and a strict maximum of 10, were selected to be honored with this prestigious award from among hundreds of submissions originating from all around the globe. Your project demonstrated originality, imaginativeness, and professionalism.&nbsp; We congratulate you on the excellence demonstrated in your outstanding work."</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Thanks very much, <a href="http://www.yosemitefilmfestival.com/">Yosemite Film Festival</a>! We're glad you like it!</p> <p><iframe src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/Y1sYKntstFo" frameborder="0" width="420" height="315"></iframe></p> <style type="text/css"></style> Awards and Recognition 2011 Yosemite Film Festival 2011 Yosemite Film Festival Silver Sierra Award Legion of Bugs Silver Sierra Award Super Park Rangers Super Rangers and the Legion of Bugs Thu, 22 Sep 2011 17:25:33 +0000 L. Greenwood 1099 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Economic Impact of Forest Pests http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/economic-impact-forest-pests.html <p>A new study was published on Friday the 9th about the economic impacts of forest insects and diseases. One thing that really struck me from the article was this line from the Abstract, "Given observations of new species, there is a 32% chance that another highly destructive borer species will invade the U.S. in the next 10 years."</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>If you think about that, it means that there is a 32% chance that some area of the country will be the epicenter for a new pest. People that live there right now, somewhere, will be moving this pest around without knowing it. They'll be responsible for other outbreaks, if they move firewood. That person could be you- you could be the one that lives there. There is just no way to know.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>This is precisely the reason that the Don't Move Firewood campaign exists. It isn't because we want to enforce quarantines, or make people pay more for a night of camping. It is because there is no way for anyone to know where the next pest outbreak might be, so all of us need to take simple precautions.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Buy firewood where you'll burn it. If you must take firewood with you, make sure it is heat treated or kiln dried wood. And don't assume wood that looks clean is harmless.</p> <p>If you want to learn more about the new article, visit it here- <a href="http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0024587">Economic Impacts of Non-Native Forest Insects in the Continental United States</a> </p> <style type="text/css"></style> Pests in the News Economic Impacts of Non-Native Forest Insects in the Continental United States Mon, 12 Sep 2011 18:18:25 +0000 L. Greenwood 1096 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Regulations in Tennessee http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/regulations-tennessee.html <p>Sometimes, even the experts at Dear Don't Move Firewood don't have all the answers. Here's our latest inquiry, with a guest answer from Tim Phelps at the Tennessee Division of Forestry.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Dear Don't Move Firewood,</em></p> <p><em>I understand that we should not move firewood where I live in Tennessee... I live in Knox County which has a quarantine, my family's farm is in Union County which is not under quarantine at this time. The firewood there is free for my cutting. But, am I allowed to move firewood this far? Can I move it from county to county. Or is the ban only for moving firewood across state lines? Is it okay to move firewood from a non quarantined county to a quarantined county. The distance to move it would be under thirty miles. Is this too far? Should I look for a safe and affordable fuel wood source locally in Knoxville? This is sad that this is happening. Wood is how we heat our home and save money. Just looking for answers and some direction on what I should do.</em></p> <p><em>Thanks,</em><br /><em> Robert in Tennessee</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Dear Robert,</p> <p>Thanks for your interest and willingness to go the extra mile to find the correct information regarding movement of firewood in and out of regulated areas in Tennessee. In general, the restrictions in Tennessee allow you to move firewood from a non-regulated county to a regulated county, but that material <em>cannot</em> come back out of the regulated county unless it meets certain requirements. Tennessee has firewood movement restrictions in several of its eastern counties of the state, not all - yet. The restrictions are in place based on the presence of either the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) or Thousand Cankers Disease (TCD), or both. The counties you mentioned - Knox and Union - <em> are </em> among those that restrict the movement of firewood. Knox County because it has both EAB and TCD. Union County <em> is </em> also currently under quarantine, but only for TCD (as of August 15, 2011).</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Because Knox has both, you <em> can </em> move firewood into that county from Union. However, because Union does <em>not</em> have EAB, you <em>cannot </em>move firewood from Knox to Union. This is indeed confusing, but it&nbsp;amplifies the point that firewood is a pathway for multiple threats and that we need to limit its movement if we stand any chance of slowing the spread of these insects and diseases.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The Tennessee Department of Agriculture has "Regulations in Plain Language" for both the EAB and TCD quarantines available on their website for further reference.</p> <p> <a href="http://www.tn.gov/agriculture/publications/regulatory/TCD_regs_PlainLanguage.pdf">http://www.tn.gov/agriculture/publications/regulatory/TCD_regs_PlainLanguage.pdf</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="http://www.tn.gov/agriculture/publications/regulatory/EAB_regs_PlainLanguage.pdf">http://www.tn.gov/agriculture/publications/regulatory/EAB_regs_PlainLanguage.pdf</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>You may also call their Regulatory Services Division at 1-800-628-2631.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Thanks for asking!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Tim Phelps, Tennessee Division of Forestry.</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates dear don't move firewood Emerald ash borer firewood quarantines Tennessee Mon, 15 Aug 2011 21:56:55 +0000 L. Greenwood 1092 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Lumber and pests http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/lumber-and-pests.html <p><em>Dear Don't Move Firewood,</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Would you be able to advise me as to whether the “Don't Move Firewood Campaign” applies to construction lumber, i.e., softwood that has no bark and been processed through a lumber mill?&nbsp; Since there is no bark, it would seem that transporting scrap construction lumber would not pose any risk. Many thanks for your help.</em></p> <p><em><br /></em></p> <p><em>Regards,</em></p> <p><em>Bob in New Jersey</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Dear Bob,</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Great question. Indeed, processed and debarked wood presents extremely low pest transport risks in comparison to wood in natural form. However, not all state and regional regulations heed this difference when it comes to untreated lumber. Presumably, this because of the huge grey areas of what constitutes processed, how large or small a piece could be and still be considered dimensional lumber, etc etc. Therefore, while using scrap lumber is just generally less of a risk, it is still not a good idea because you could still be subject to fines in many situations.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The other thing to consider is that if you are like me, you store your scrap lumber outside in the elements, in a relatively unorganized pile. This means that natural things, like bugs that fly and crawl, and diseases that spread in the wind, can access your scraps. So moving scrap lumber could still move egg sacs, adult bugs, or disease particles. And that's exactly what you want to avoid, of course.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>I hope this helps you understand all the dimensions of your question, and thanks for asking!</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates dear don't move firewood Mon, 08 Aug 2011 19:12:47 +0000 L. Greenwood 1090 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Two more Dear Don't Move Firewood letters http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/two-more-dear-dont-move-firewood-letters.html <p>Two notes came in recently, bringing about another episode of your favorite advice column...</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Dear Don't Move Firewood;</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><em>I have quite a pile of treated lumber from a fence that we took down. This is not cut/split wood... is it safe to bring to a campsite and use as firewood?</em></p> <p class="MsoPlainText">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><em>Michael T, Concerned Firewood User.</em></p> <p class="MsoPlainText">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoPlainText">Dear Michael;</p> <p class="MsoPlainText">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoPlainText">I shuddered a little when I saw the words "treated lumber" and "firewood" in the same paragraph. Without knowing exactly what the treatment of your lumber is, I can tell you that most lumber treatments use really toxic chemicals, including formaldehyde and arsenic. You want NOTHING to do with burning that stuff, under any circumstances. Pest risk aside, this is not wood for firewood. </p> <p class="MsoPlainText">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoPlainText">Now, perhaps when you wrote "treated lumber" you actually meant polyurethane stain, or something else more harmless. In that case, you probably won't poison yourself with toxic gases, but it still is not a great idea to burn it. Further, many regulations and laws don't have exemptions for this kind of wood re-use, so you could still be asked to give up the wood upon arriving at your destination, or even get a hefty fine. It just isn't worth the risk.</p> <p class="MsoPlainText">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoPlainText">Last but not least, this wood could still harbor pests. For instance, Gypsy moth egg cases are often found on things like fence posts- even treated wood. That's not something you want to spread.</p> <p class="MsoPlainText">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoPlainText">I'm glad that you asked the question. The best thing to do is to either dispose of it without burning (if it is pressure treated or similar) or use it on site.</p> <p class="MsoPlainText">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><em>Dear Don't Move Firewood;</em></p> <p class="MsoPlainText">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoPlainText">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><em>I think the problem really is that firewood is so expensive to buy at camping locations. It is ridiculous to spend $6 on one campfire when you can simple bring a bit of wood from home. If you could address this problem, you would find a solution.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Shawna W., Concerned Firewood User</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Dear Shawna;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>I totally agree. The price of wood is a big problem when it comes to encouraging best firewood practices. I try to take solace in the fact that when there are more buyers, there is room for more competition in the market, and prices will decrease.&nbsp; So prices should go down with time as more people buy firewood near where they will burn it. And in many areas, you can collect wood on site for free, anyway. Please don't let the price of wood keep you from starting a million dollar bug problem! And thanks for telling us what you are thinking about.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoPlainText">&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates Mon, 01 Aug 2011 19:04:34 +0000 L. Greenwood 1089 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Updates around the country http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/updates-around-country.html <p>It has been a tough few weeks around the country in the realm of forest pests. Here's a few important stories to keep abreast of:</p> <ul> <li><a href="http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/story/2011/07/27/exotic-ash-borer-threatens-montreal-trees.html" target="_blank">Montreal finds emerald ash borer</a></li> </ul> <ul> <li><a href="http://www.vdacs.virginia.gov/news/releases-b/072111tcd.shtml" target="_blank">Virginia's announcement of Thousand Cankers Disease outbreak and quarantine</a></li> </ul> <ul> <li><a href="http://www.boston.com/news/local/massachusetts/articles/2011/07/15/nh_toughens_out_of_state_firewood_ban/?rss_id=Boston.com+--+Local+news" target="_blank">New Hampshire toughens out of state firewood ban</a></li> </ul> <ul> <li><a href="http://www.timesunion.com/local/article/Ash-Borer-case-results-in-charge-1583756.php" target="_blank">Violation of emerald ash borer quarantine results in fine</a></li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates don't move firewood Emerald ash borer montreal new york state quebec thousand cankers disease virginia Thu, 28 Jul 2011 18:18:31 +0000 L. Greenwood 1088 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Thank You, Zoar Outdoor! http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/thank-you-zoar-outdoor.html <p><strong><span class="textUpper">Newsflash! We are excited to tell everyone about a cool partnership that we started this year. Read the news release below to learn more...<br /></span></strong></p> <p><strong><span class="textUpper">CHARLEMONT, MA</span></strong><strong>&nbsp;|&nbsp;</strong><strong>July 25, 2011</strong></p> <p>Today, The Nature Conservancy’s <a href="http://www.nature.org/aboutus/diversity/leaf/index.htm" target="">Leaders in Environmental Action for the Future</a> (LEAF) program interns from New York City will tour the forest canopy at Zoar Outdoor Adventure Resort through a unique partnership to protect America’s forests.</p> <p>A recent $6,000 donation from Zoar Outdoor will support the Conservancy’s <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/" target="">Don’t Move Firewood campaign</a>, a multimedia outreach effort to educate the public on the issue of non-native forest insects and diseases that are wreaking havoc on trees in all regions of the United States. In the <a href="http://www.nature.org/ourinitiatives/regions/northamerica/unitedstates/massachusetts/index.htm" target="">Massachusetts</a> forests, the newest and most prominent threats to trees are the Asian longhorned beetle and the emerald ash borer.</p> <p>More than 30,000 street and backyard trees were removed in Worcester, Massachusetts after an infestation of the Asian longhorned beetle was discovered in 2008. The emerald ash borer has been found in 15 states, including in eastern New York. Millions of trees have been killed in the Midwestern states by the emerald ash borer, and there is no treatment or spray that works to control this invasive insect once it reaches the forest.</p> <p>In order to the prevent the spread of these and other invasive insects in the Commonwealth, the Conservancy’s Don’t Move Firewood campaign raises awareness about a common method of insect transport within the US — as hitchhikers on firewood. When people transport firewood further than 50 miles for camping trips or heating homes, tree-killing pests can get a ride to new place, where they cause new infestations.</p> <p>As part of the Conservancy’s Don’t Move Firewood campaign, three New York City teens participating in the Conservancy’s (LEAF) program in western Massachusetts will zip line through Zoar Outdoor’s canopy to view the ecological importance of trees from a new perspective. Nationwide, about 70 students − many of whom have never spent time out of their city − will participate in the paid internship program from July 11 through August 5.</p> <p>This is the 17th year of the LEAF program, whose mission is to engage urban youth in conservation activities now so that they will become stewards for our planet tomorrow. A recent survey of LEAF alumni found that the students are far more likely than their peers to engage in environmental issues as adults.</p> <p>This comprehensive, environmental leadership program serves students attending multicultural environmental high schools in urban areas including New York, New Jersey, Connecticut and Georgia. With the assistance of a $3.1 million grant from the Toyota USA Foundation, the program will also add new schools in California, Illinois and Massachusetts by 2012.</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates don't move firewood zoar outdoor Wed, 27 Jul 2011 21:50:38 +0000 L. Greenwood 1087 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Virginia announces Thousand Cankers Disease http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/virginia-announces-thousand-cankers-disease.html-0 <p>Walnut trees of the Eastern states are threatened by Thousand cankers disease, a fungus that is transmitted by a beetle. Unfortunately, a new infestation of this disease and the resulting quarantine were announced by the state of Virginia today. Wood products made from walnut are not tightly regulated, and the movement of firewood, of course, is part of this quarantine.</p> <p>For more information, see the Press Release by the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services here;</p> <p><a href="http://www.vdacs.virginia.gov/news/releases-b/072111tcd.shtml" title="http://www.vdacs.virginia.gov/news/releases-b/072111tcd.shtml">http://www.vdacs.virginia.gov/news/releases-b/072111tcd.shtml</a></p> <p>They also have a twitter feed that is quite informative. Check it out!</p> <p>http://twitter.com/#!/vaagriculture/</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>(Also, apologies for the ugly links. The blog link-maker is malfunctioning today!)</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> thousand cankers disease vdacs virginia walnut tree walnut twig beetle Fri, 22 Jul 2011 18:30:48 +0000 L. Greenwood 1086 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Virginia announces Thousand Cankers Disease http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/virginia-announces-thousand-cankers-disease.html <p>Walnut trees of the Eastern states are threatened by Thousand cankers disease, a fungus that is transmitted by a beetle. Unfortunately, a new infestation of this disease and the resulting quarantine were announced by the state of Virginia today. Wood products made from walnut are now tightly regulated, and the movement of firewood, of course, is part of this quarantine.</p> <p>For more information, see the Press Release by the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services here;</p> <p><a href="http://www.vdacs.virginia.gov/news/releases-b/072111tcd.shtml" title="http://www.vdacs.virginia.gov/news/releases-b/072111tcd.shtml">http://www.vdacs.virginia.gov/news/releases-b/072111tcd.shtml</a></p> <p>They also have a twitter feed that is quite informative. Check it out!</p> <p>http://twitter.com/#!/vaagriculture/</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>(Also, apologies for the ugly links. The blog link-maker is malfunctioning today!)</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> thousand cankers disease vdacs virginia walnut tree walnut twig beetle Fri, 22 Jul 2011 18:30:46 +0000 L. Greenwood 1085 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Update on Ohio's Asian longhorned beetles http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/update-ohios-asian-longhorned-beetles.html <p>The infestation area of Asian longhorned beetles in Ohio seems to be limited to Bethel, Ohio, a town about 30 miles southeast of Cincinnati. The infested area is now under quarantine, and the news articles I've been seeing indicate an infestation that is around 3 to 5 years old. Of course, we are trying to keep up to date on this! Here is the central link for Ohio's Department of Agriculture Asian longhorned beetle page... <a href="http://www.agri.ohio.gov/TopNews/asianbeetle/" title="http://www.agri.ohio.gov/TopNews/asianbeetle/">http://www.agri.ohio.gov/TopNews/asianbeetle/</a></p> <p>Remember, up until a few weeks ago nobody knew these beetles were out there. The pests you don't know about are just as bad as the ones you DO know about, so don't move firewood and be tree aware!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>For the official USDA APHIS press release, see <a href="http://www.aphis.usda.gov/newsroom/2011/06/adult_detection_ALB.shtml" title="http://www.aphis.usda.gov/newsroom/2011/06/adult_detection_ALB.shtml">http://www.aphis.usda.gov/newsroom/2011/06/adult_detection_ALB.shtml</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Quarantines asian longhorned beetle new infestation Ohio Tue, 28 Jun 2011 16:51:18 +0000 L. Greenwood 1084 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Asian longhorned beetle in Ohio http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/asian-longhorned-beetle-ohio.html <p>Surveys to determine the extent of the newly discovered Asian longhorned beetle were begun today, after the destructive beetle was confirmed by USDA officials. Here at Don't Move Firewood, we are really, really sad to hear this. Ohio has already been hit with the emerald ash borer, and for the Asian longhorned beetle to be found there is an enormous blow to that community. For more information, please visit-</p> <p>Ohio Dept of Agriculture General Beetle Site: <a href="http://www.agri.ohio.gov/asianbeetle/" title="http://www.agri.ohio.gov/asianbeetle/">http://www.agri.ohio.gov/asianbeetle/</a></p> <p>Today's Press Release: <a href="http://www.agri.ohio.gov/asianbeetle/docs/Adult_Detection_ALB.pdf" title="http://www.agri.ohio.gov/asianbeetle/docs/Adult_Detection_ALB.pdf">http://www.agri.ohio.gov/asianbeetle/docs/Adult_Detection_ALB.pdf</a></p> <p>Also, I feel like it is worth mentioning that once again, this beetle was found by a member of the public. To whoever it was that saw their trees looking damaged and reported it- GOOD WORK. We should all be alert!</p> <p>NOTE: Earlier this week, this blog entry erroneously stated that there was a quarantine in place for this ALB infestation. 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mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} </style> <![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 10]> <style> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} </style> <![endif]--><p><span style="font-size: 11pt; font-family: 'Calibri','sans-serif';" lang="EN">the correct status is that State and Federal Officials are working to establish a quarantine for the infested area in the near future</span>. However, even in the absence of an official quarantine, it is critically important to not move any firewood or other untreated wood in Ohio until the extent of the problem is understood. Thank you!</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Outbreaks asian longhorned beetle Ohio ohio department of agriculture surveys Fri, 17 Jun 2011 19:29:20 +0000 L. Greenwood 1083 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Another episode of Dear Don't Move Firewood http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/another-episode-dear-dont-move-firewood.html <p>A visitor recently inquired about interstate log movement. Here's the question;</p> <p> </p> <p><i>Dear Don't Move Firewood,</i></p> <p><i><br /></i></p> <p><i>You say don't move firewood, yet loggers can move bolts across the states? What gives?</i></p> <p><i><br /></i></p> <p><i>Yours,</i></p> <p><i>Randy</i></p> <p> </p> <p>Dear Randy,</p> <p> </p> <p>There are some critical differences between lumber operations and the movement of firewood. The most obvious difference is the simplest; the movement of logs, timber, lumber, bolts, and so forth is part of an organized, identifiable, industry. It can be (and is) clearly regulated by federal, state, and/or local laws. So when there is a problem, generally speaking, action can be taken to regulate the industry and mitigate the issues.</p> <p> </p> <p>On the other hand, the movement of firewood is almost entirely unorganized. Firewood is moved largely by individuals acting on their own accord. Therefore, firewood is a trickier element. Further, firewood is often from suburban and urban areas, which is where many non-native pest infestations are at their worst. So the wood supply is typically more risky (although that's certainly not always the case).</p> <p> </p> <p>And lastly, for the most part, timber goes from forest to mill site. It doesn't spend all summer in a heap next to a campsite in the woods. So the chances of something crawling out of timber in a log yard and into an uninfested stand of trees is generally lower.</p> <p> </p> <p>I hope this helps you understand why not moving firewood is a different, and important, issue than the movement of wood in commercial timber operations. Neither is risk free, but they are not the same!</p> <p> </p> <p>Thanks for asking.</p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates dear don't move firewood firewood state quarantine Tue, 31 May 2011 17:00:35 +0000 L. Greenwood 1079 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Emerald Ash Borer Awareness Week! http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/emerald-ash-borer-awareness-week.html <p>In honor of EAB awareness week, here's the top resources to help you learn what you need to know about the little green beetles that eat ash trees.</p> <p> </p> <p>1. Start at <a href="http://emeraldashborer.info/">Emeraldashborer.info</a></p> <p>2. View our new computer animation of the <a href="http://www.youtube.com/dontmovefirewood#p/u/0/01anA226ROY">EAB - firewood connection</a>, and many other videos, on our <a href="http://www.youtube.com/dontmovefirewood#p/u/0/01anA226ROY">YouTube channel</a>.</p> <p> </p> <p>3. Feeling like <a href="http://www.cerceris.info/">hunting EABs with cool harmless native wasp, huh?</a> You should see if there is a Wasp Watcher group near you.</p> <p>4. Want to keep REALLY up to date? <a href="http://emeraldashborer.info/eab_university.cfm">Emerald Ash Borer University </a>is the place to go!</p> <p>5. We've been updating our awesome <a href="https://www.facebook.com/DontMoveFirewood">Facebook</a> and <a href="http://twitter.com/#%21/dntmovefirewood">Twitter</a> accounts all week in honor of EAB Awareness. If you haven't already...<a href="https://www.facebook.com/DontMoveFirewood"> friend us</a>! Check out our <a href="http://twitter.com/#%21/dntmovefirewood">Tweets</a>!</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Pests in the News Emerald ash borer awareness week Thu, 26 May 2011 01:02:21 +0000 L. Greenwood 1078 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Our new Spanish logo, No mueva la lena http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/our-new-spanish-logo-no-mueva-la-lena.html <p>We are proud to reveal our new spanish Don't Move Firewood logo! It has a really neat complimentary design for the words "No mueva la lena," and can be <a href="http://dontmovefirewood.org/sites//default/files/Spanish%20Logo-Final.zip">downloaded here</a> for use on any spanish language outreach tools.</p> <p> </p> <p>Regrettably, we don't current have a Don't Move Firewood website in spanish. When we do, some wonderful day, we'll let everyone know!</p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates firewood no mueva la lena spanish firewood education spanish logo Wed, 11 May 2011 15:01:45 +0000 L. Greenwood 1054 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Don't Move Firewood, it bugs me; the story of a cool bumper sticker http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/dont-move-firewood-it-bugs-me-story-cool-bumper-sticker.html <p>You may have seen the stickers out there- Don't Move Firewood, it bugs me. And sometimes people email us to ask- where do they come from? Are they from the Don't Move Firewood campaign itself?</p> <p> </p> <p>I have answers!</p> <p> </p> <p>The "Don't Move Firewood, it bugs me" bumper stickers (well, bumper magnets) are a product of another group working on the firewood problem- specifically, United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Animal Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) Emerald ash borer team. These magnets are great, because they are eye catching, widespread, and get the message across. But no, we don't make them ourselves here at Don't Move Firewood.</p> <p> </p> <p>You might notice at the bottom of the magnet, below "it bugs me," is a link to <a href="http://emeraldashborer.info/">emeraldashborer.info</a>, which is a very informative website about one of the most harmful pests that travel on firewood, the emerald ash borer. If you want to learn about that bug, you should totally <a href="http://emeraldashborer.info/">visit their site</a>.</p> <p> </p> <p>Lastly, I wanted to take the time to thank USDA-APHIS for sending the Don't Move Firewood campaign team a whopping 10,000 of these magnets for our summer outreach project this year. We are really excited to be able to use our outreach booth to benefit both their group, and our group, towards our common goal of firewood outreach. Thanks!</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates bumper sticker dont move firewood EAB Emerald ash borer it bugs me Wed, 11 May 2011 14:48:52 +0000 L. Greenwood 1055 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Fuel Calculator question http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/fuel-calculator-question.html <p>Today we are featuring another good question for our firewood advice column, this time about our fuel calculator (note: I rewrote the question to make it easier to read).</p> <p> </p> <p><i>Dear Don't Move Firewood,</i></p> <p><i><br /></i></p> <p><i> </i></p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><i>How much fuel and CO2 is used to cart wood and sell it at campgrounds? Does this counteract what is saved by not bringing it yourself? Note; I don't need a fire most days.</i></p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><i><br /></i></p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><i>Thanks,</i></p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><i>Jake</i></p> <p class="MsoPlainText"> </p> <p class="MsoPlainText">Dear Jake,</p> <p class="MsoPlainText"> </p> <p class="MsoPlainText">This is a really thoughtful question, because you are right to consider that there is always a cost in fuel for all the wood getting trucked to the campsite, whether in your personal vehicle, or in bulk in a firewood vendor's truck. But I'm going to stick by the statement that buying at your destination is still preferable.</p> <p class="MsoPlainText"> </p> <p class="MsoPlainText">For the sake of brevity, I'll break it down into bullet points of why buying it at or very near the campsite is the way to go.</p> <p class="MsoPlainText"> </p> <p class="MsoPlainText">- Bulk transport of all the wood by one truck is going to be more efficient than each camper bringing their own.</p> <p class="MsoPlainText">- The firewood is more likely to be locally cut, which is preferable ecologically.</p> <p class="MsoPlainText">- The total distance traveled by a vendor will be shorter- so even if each wood-moving-mile costs the same amount in fuel, with fewer miles, the advantage will be there.</p> <p class="MsoPlainText"> </p> <p class="MsoPlainText">I hope this makes sense. And of course, as you mentioned, not every single camping trip requires a campfire.</p> <p class="MsoPlainText"> </p> <p class="MsoPlainText">Lastly, check out our<a href="/burn-safe/firewood-calculator.html"> fuel calculator</a> to do your own math!</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates carbon dioxide dear don't move firewood firewood cost fuel calculator Wed, 04 May 2011 17:55:01 +0000 L. Greenwood 1056 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org "Buy it where you burn it" question http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/buy-it-where-you-burn-it-question.html <p class="MsoPlainText">A new question for our occasional firewood advice column...</p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><i><br /></i></p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><i>Dear Don't Move Firewood,<br /></i></p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><i><br /></i></p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><i>The only problem with buying wood near the place where you are camping is</i></p> <p><i> </i></p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><i>this:<span> </span>The wood I purchased while I was in Fort Mountain, GA, came for far West TN, and I was only a few miles from Fort Mountain.<span> </span>How does that help the situation?<span> </span>That is your recommendation.<span> </span>Not to mention it was $5.00 more expensive per bundle then the wood I could have purchased 50 miles away which was cut at the same place in TN?</i></p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><i><br /></i></p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><i>Yours, </i></p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><i>Garett in Georgia</i></p> <p class="MsoPlainText"> </p> <p class="MsoPlainText">Dear Garett,</p> <p class="MsoPlainText"> </p> <p class="MsoPlainText">How frustrating. You are right- that doesn't help the situation.</p> <p class="MsoPlainText"> </p> <p class="MsoPlainText">Ideally, of course, the wood in Fort Mountain would have been reasonably priced, and from nearby Georgia- not from far away and across state lines in Tennessee. I know this always isn't the reality, and regrettably, you found out the hard way. My only advice is that next time, call ahead. Ask questions. And if you find that the wood at your destination is going to be from far away source (or priced inappropriately), consider other options. Maybe you could buy kiln dried wood? Or a log-like firewood substitute? Or you could buy the wood when you are most of the way there- maybe not at your final destination, but pretty close.</p> <p class="MsoPlainText"> </p> <p class="MsoPlainText">Most of all though, voice your frustration with the vendors themselves. Education is the key. Tell them you'd prefer locally harvested wood, and that next time you are taking your consumer dollar elsewhere.</p> <p class="MsoPlainText"> </p> <p class="MsoPlainText">Good luck, and I'm glad to hear you tried to do the right thing. Change takes time, and here at Don't Move Firewood, we appreciate your effort.</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates ask don't move firewood dear don't move firewood firewood question Mon, 02 May 2011 21:05:54 +0000 L. Greenwood 1057 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org We have free DVDs http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/we-have-free-dvds.html <p>Are you looking for our free DVD offer? Did you end up at our site because you are one of the thousands of people that saw we have free DVDs on the various "free stuff" sites around the internet? Well, you have come to the right place.</p> <p> </p> <p>If you want a free DVD, here is what you do. Go to our <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/form/dvd-request.html">Free DVD Request page</a>, and FILL OUT THE FORM. The whole thing. Be courteous and honest. In return, you will indeed receive your free DVD. If you fail to fill out the whole form, or if you are rude, we won't send you one.</p> <p> </p> <p>Here's<a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/form/dvd-request.html"> the form! </a>Have at it!</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates don't move firewood free dvd dvd free dvd free stuff Thu, 28 Apr 2011 15:23:31 +0000 L. Greenwood 1058 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Happy Earth Day! http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/happy-earth-day.html <p>Don't Move Firewood is celebrating Earth Day today by thanking all the organizations that make this campaign possible. Thank you, thank you, thank you to our advisory committee, our funding agencies, and our incredible array of colleagues.</p> <p> </p> <p>The list below doesn't include all our collaborating groups, but it does have all of our formal supporters and funding groups. THANK YOU!</p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <ul> <li><a href="http://www.actrees.org/" target="_blank">Alliance for Community Trees</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.forestfoundation.org/" target="_blank">American Forest Foundation</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.anla.org/" target="_blank">American Nursery &amp; Landscape Association</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.granthamfoundation.org/">Grantham Foundation for the Protection of the Environment</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.stateforesters.org/">National Association of State Foresters</a></li> <li><span class="nonprofit_content"><span class="formElement">Nion Robert Thieriot Foundation</span></span></li> <li><a href="http://www.threatenedforests.com/" target="_blank">Partnership for Saving Threatened Forests</a></li> <li><a target="_blank" href="http://www.agriculture.state.pa.us/">Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.entm.purdue.edu/">Purdue University, Department of Entomology</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.safnow.org/" target="_blank">Society of American Florists</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.safnet.org/">Society of American Foresters</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.nature.org/">The Nature Conservancy</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.ucdavis.edu/index.html">University of California, Davis</a></li> <li><a href="http://na.fs.fed.us/" target="_blank">US Forest Service, Northeastern Area</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.fs.fed.us/r8/">US Forest Service, Southern Region (8)</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.fs.fed.us/psw/">US Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.aphis.usda.gov/plant_health/plant_pest_info/">USDA Animal Plant Health Inspection Service</a></li> </ul> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates 2011 earth day Fri, 22 Apr 2011 15:46:41 +0000 L. Greenwood 1059 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org New organization of Don't Move Firewood http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/new-organization-dont-move-firewood.html <p>We've been busy reorganizing our website this week, so if you notice anything amiss, let us know at our <a href="/forms/contact-us.html">Contact Us</a> page!</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Fri, 15 Apr 2011 21:11:33 +0000 L. Greenwood 1060 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Emerald Ash Borer made it to Chicago http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/emerald-ash-borer-made-it-chicago.html <p>The city of Chicago has a new pest to deal with; the Emerald Ash Borer.</p> <p>The city of Chicago has a new pest to deal with; the Emerald Ash Borer. Small, bright green, and highly damaging to ash trees, the "EAB" is a huge economic and environmental threat.</p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/chi-emerald-ash-borer-web-jun20,0,3520887.story">Read this article</a> from the Chicago Tribune- it shows how the city is being proactive. Their quick response will be hugely important for the residents of Chicago and surrounding areas.</p> <p>The EAB is from Asia, and is established around the Midwest in a variety of parks, cities, and forests. While the Chicago outbreak probably didn't come from firewood, it has the potential to spread that way if residents unwittingly cut down an infested tree and bring the wood on a camping trip or at a vacation spot.</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Outbreaks Pests in the News Fri, 15 Apr 2011 21:11:33 +0000 L. Greenwood 730 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Dramatic goldspotted oak borer video http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/dramatic-goldspotted-oak-borer-video.html <p>The goldspotted oak borer is killing really big, really old, really amazing oak trees in Southern California's San Diego county. It almost certainly reached that spot because someone moved firewood from the native range of the bug (parts of Arizona and Northern Mexico). This borer is certainly now moving around quickly because of firewood. And lastly, it is feared that this insect will spread all the way to LA- and up the coast- if firewood is taken out of the infested region and brought to the big city.</p> <p> </p> <p>I'm so impressed with the recent goldspotted oak borer show on California's PBS station, KPBS, that I wanted to highlight it on the blog. Check out the article and the video- the information is great, the images are shocking, and the overall messages are nearly perfect. So head over to<a href="http://www.kpbs.org/news/2011/apr/01/invasive-beetle-killing-coast-live-oaks/"> Invasive Beetle Killing Coast Live Oaks</a> to learn more and watch the clip.</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Outbreaks agrilus California goldspotted oak borer kpbs Wed, 13 Apr 2011 17:52:16 +0000 L. Greenwood 680 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Faux Firewood? http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/faux-firewood.html <p>I get a lot of interesting ideas and news from our Contact page, where people can say just about anything they want to me, Leigh, the administrator of the Don't Move Firewood daily affairs. Not infrequently, I get people that want to promote a legitimate product to replace conventional cut-wood firewood, something like a compressed sawdust log, or a pressed wood log, or a reclaimed wood product.</p> <p> </p> <p>For the record; as long as there are minimal or, ideally, no other products (glue, solvent, etc) and the wood source in the "log" is well-conceived (reclaimed, waste product, recycled sawdust, sustainably sourced scrap wood, small diameter thinned wood, fire salvage wood, whatever), I personally DO agree that your product is a viable replacement for the occasional firewood user. And if it is made from either heat treated material, or material processed into rather tiny bits, then I also agree it is safe to move long distances.</p> <p> </p> <p>However, we do not promote these items. There are two reasons for this;</p> <p> </p> <p>1) Don't Move Firewood is part of a non-profit. As such, we cannot confer gain upon a for-profit-entity. Bluntly, we can't promote your product because the government says that we can't, and we play by their rules.</p> <p> </p> <p>2) Firewood is, at its core, not the problem. The decentralized movement of firewood by individuals, sometimes going long distances, is the problem. Firewood replacement products, which are a very small part of the firewood market, are therefore not the answer.</p> <p> </p> <p>I think many of your products are great, and keep up the good work. But we can't promote them, and to say they solve the problem misses the bigger picture.</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates fake firewood fake logs firewood pressed wood logs Fri, 01 Apr 2011 19:38:28 +0000 L. Greenwood 681 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Kansas pines at risk http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/kansas-pines-risk.html <p>Kansas is mostly thought of as a state full of grasslands and corn. But it has a lot of trees in urban areas, along creeks and rivers, and an extensive history of planting trees along the edges of fields as windbreaks (to lessen the strength of the wide-open space's windy days).</p> <p> </p> <p>These patches of trees are threatened by pine wilt, a non-native disease. So how does it spread? Pine wilt nematodes (like tiny worms) are accidentally spread by native pine sawyer beetles- and the beetles move on contaminated firewood! You can learn more in<a href="http://www.plantmanagementnetwork.org/pub/php/news/2011/DeadPines/"> this recent KSU press release</a>, or read below for a short excerpt from the handy publication <a href="http://www.plantpath.k-state.edu/DesktopModules/ViewDocument.aspx?DocumentID=943"><i>Pine Diseases In Kansas: Tip Blight, Dothistroma Needle Blight, and Pine Wilt</i></a></p> <p> </p> <p>"If a tree is suspected to have pine wilt, bring a sample to your local K-State Research and Extension office (for testing)... If the test is positive, the tree should be cut down as soon as possible, or by May 1 at the latest, before the beetles emerge. April 1 is a better deadline to make sure no beetles emerge. Cut the tree to the ground — do not leave a stump. Chip or burn the wood immediately to destroy the beetles and nematodes. Do not save the wood for firewood."</p> <p> </p> <p>Got that? Chip or burn your dead pines, or pine firewood, promptly. This is a serious disease and getting rid of your dead pines NOW will prevent other trees from dying.</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Outbreaks kansas pine sawyer pine wilt Wed, 30 Mar 2011 16:02:26 +0000 L. Greenwood 682 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org The firs next time? http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/firs-next-time.html <p>The brown longhorned beetle found in a shipping crate in Baltimore this week (<a href="http://www.abc2news.com/dpp/news/region/baltimore_city/foreign-beetle-discovered-in-shipping-crate">see article here</a>) serves as an excellent reminder that invasive forest pests are not a predictable bunch. Despite regulations on importing crates, the crate was made of non-compliant materials (presumably untreated wood, but the article doesn't actually specify). This is most likely why the beetle was found in the crate, alive and well, ready to attack the trees of Baltimore.</p> <p> </p> <p>In the biggest picture, the reality is that despite a ban on certain imports since 2005 in the hopes of preventing the brown longhorned beetle from getting here, it is totally possible that the darn thing is already established at some port of entry in the US. Considering that this species attacks firs (most often thought of as the kind of tree used for Christmas trees), the repeated message from Don't Move Firewood that you can't judge firewood as safe to move solely based on the tree species rings especially true.</p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <style type="text/css"></style> asian longhorned beetle baltimore brown longhorned beetle fir trees Tue, 29 Mar 2011 20:24:09 +0000 L. Greenwood 683 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Good preparation in Connecticut http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/good-preparation-connecticut.html <p>Emerald ash borer preparations are underway in Connecticut, thanks to the smart work highlighted in <a href="http://www.theday.com/article/20110311/NWS01/303119920/1017">this recent article</a> by TheDay.com Connecticut.</p> <p> </p> <p>My favorite part of the article, naturally, was this;</p> <p> </p> <p><i>Movement of firewood is a main means of transport for the pest to new locations, although adult ash borers can also fly up to several miles.</i></p> <p><i><br class="hardreturn" /> "The message is, if you go to a campground, don't bring firewood with you, buy it there," Trenchard said.</i></p> <p> </p> <p>To read the whole thing, and learn more about what they are doing in Connecticut to prepare for an emerald ash borer emergency, <a href="http://www.theday.com/article/20110311/NWS01/303119920/1017">click here</a>.</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Pests in the News Connecticut CT don't move firewood EAB Emerald ash borer firewood Mon, 14 Mar 2011 20:46:31 +0000 L. Greenwood 684 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Nothing, or something bad http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/nothing-or-something-bad.html <p>I had a really great lunch with an old friend last week, and we talked a lot about white pine blister rust. If you aren't familiar with it, white pine blister rust is one of the oldest, and most widespread, non-native forest pests in North America. It was introduced just at the dawn of the 1900s, and it is still killing pine trees all over our continent to this day.</p> <p> </p> <p>One of the things that we talked about was, at a grand scale, the genetics of invasive species. And I explained that in my opinion, moving firewood of any sort, ever, is a bad idea- not only because it might create new infestations of non-native pests, but also because it could result in the non-natural movement, colonization, and hybridization of native pests. White pine blister rust is pretty much everywhere, but that doesn't make it OK to move infested pines, in my book. And he agreed, and said...</p> <p>"If you think about it, there are two possible outcomes of the movement of any sort of pest; nothing, or something bad."</p> <p> </p> <p>And I think this is a very good way of summing it up. If you move firewood, most often, nothing comes of it. That's true. But every once in a while, something bad could happen. And it is worth noting that nothing good (in a biological sense) could happen from moving firewood. You won't ever make a less harmful forest pest- that's biologically impossible in this context- but you could create new populations, or hybrids, or... something else, bad.</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Outbreaks bark beetles don't move firewood firewood movement native pests Wed, 09 Mar 2011 22:32:02 +0000 L. Greenwood 685 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Ask Don't Move Firewood: Finding certified products http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/ask-dont-move-firewood-finding-certified-products.html <p>Interesting question (sort of more of a statement) today from Todd in New York.</p> <p> </p> <p>Dear Don't Move Firewood;</p> <p> </p> <p><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <w:WordDocument> <w:View>Normal</w:View> <w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom> <w:TrackMoves /> <w:TrackFormatting /> <w:PunctuationKerning /> <w:ValidateAgainstSchemas /> <w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid> <w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent> <w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText> <w:DoNotPromoteQF /> <w:LidThemeOther>EN-US</w:LidThemeOther> <w:LidThemeAsian>X-NONE</w:LidThemeAsian> <w:LidThemeComplexScript>X-NONE</w:LidThemeComplexScript> <w:Compatibility> <w:BreakWrappedTables /> <w:SnapToGridInCell /> <w:WrapTextWithPunct /> <w:UseAsianBreakRules /> <w:DontGrowAutofit /> <w:SplitPgBreakAndParaMark 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SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Emphasis" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="59" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Table Grid" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Placeholder Text" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="1" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="No Spacing" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Shading" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light List" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Grid" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 1" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 2" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" 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SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Shading Accent 1" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light List Accent 1" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Grid Accent 1" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 1 Accent 1" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 2 Accent 1" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 1 Accent 1" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Revision" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="34" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="List Paragraph" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="29" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Quote" /> 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UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 1 Accent 2" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="68" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 2 Accent 2" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="69" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 3 Accent 2" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Dark List Accent 2" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Shading Accent 2" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful List Accent 2" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Grid Accent 2" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Shading Accent 3" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light List 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SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 2 Accent 4" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 1 Accent 4" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="66" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 2 Accent 4" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="67" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 1 Accent 4" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="68" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 2 Accent 4" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="69" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 3 Accent 4" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Dark List Accent 4" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Shading Accent 4" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful List Accent 4" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Grid Accent 4" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Shading Accent 5" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light List Accent 5" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Grid Accent 5" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 1 Accent 5" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 2 Accent 5" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 1 Accent 5" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="66" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 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Locked="false" Priority="61" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light List Accent 6" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Grid Accent 6" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 1 Accent 6" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 2 Accent 6" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 1 Accent 6" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="66" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 2 Accent 6" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="67" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 1 Accent 6" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="68" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 2 Accent 6" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="69" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 3 Accent 6" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Dark List Accent 6" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Shading Accent 6" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful List Accent 6" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Grid Accent 6" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="19" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Subtle Emphasis" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="21" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Intense Emphasis" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="31" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Subtle Reference" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="32" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Intense Reference" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="33" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Book Title" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="37" Name="Bibliography" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" QFormat="true" Name="TOC Heading" /> </w:LatentStyles> </xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <w:LatentStyles DefLockedState="false" DefUnhideWhenUsed="true" DefSemiHidden="true" DefQFormat="false" DefPriority="99" LatentStyleCount="267"> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="0" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Normal" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="heading 1" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" QFormat="true" Name="heading 2" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" QFormat="true" Name="heading 3" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" 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<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="35" QFormat="true" Name="caption" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="10" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Title" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="1" Name="Default Paragraph Font" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="11" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Subtitle" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="22" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Strong" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="20" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Emphasis" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="59" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Table Grid" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Placeholder Text" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="1" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="No Spacing" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" 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SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 3" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Dark List" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Shading" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful List" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Grid" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Shading Accent 1" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light List Accent 1" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Grid Accent 1" /> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 1 Accent 1" /> 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table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} --><!--[if gte mso 10]> <mce:style><! /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} --><!--[endif]--><!--[endif]--></p> <p class="MsoPlainText">I am a producer of firewood who sells USDA and New York State approved firewood. I think it would be a good idea to let people know where to buy approved firewood in their area.</p> <p class="MsoPlainText"> </p> <p class="MsoPlainText">Dear Todd;</p> <p class="MsoPlainText"> </p> <p class="MsoPlainText">I agree completely that it is a good idea to let people know there is such a thing as approved firewood in various forms, and that there are many good sellers out there. Unfortunately, nationwide, there is an incredibly complex and broad array of regulations, laws, standards, and systems. As a campaign, Don't Move Firewood cannot do all things. We've made a concious decision to serve as an educational outlet for best behaviors, and not as a clearinghouse for vendors or regulations, so that we can do one thing and do it well.</p> <p class="MsoPlainText"> </p> <p class="MsoPlainText">Our best advice is to ask questions and get to know what the rules are in your area, then find out who is following them, and then buy from those vendors. If people like Todd can spread the word about how their products are safer, and therefore better, then everyone will benefit. Thanks for contacting us!</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Outbreaks certified firewood Emerald ash borer firewood firewood dealers Thu, 03 Mar 2011 20:45:15 +0000 L. Greenwood 686 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org But how do they get here? http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/how-do-they-get-here.html <p>Any reader of Don't Move Firewood knows that once a pest is in North America, one of the ways they move is on contaminated firewood. But do you know how those pests get here in the first place?</p> <p> </p> <p>Pallets, crates, those giant wooden spools, and certain kinds of live plants can harbor infestations, and thus bring in forest pests when they are moved or imported. And of course, these things can come from far away (like China or Russia) or they can come from a pre-existing infestation closer to home (like Canada).</p> <p> </p> <p>To address the potential invaders from Canada, the parent organization of Don't Move Firewood (called the <a href="/about.html">Continental Dialogue on Non-native insects and diseases</a>) put out a press release recently. To read more about how carefully restricting the movement of shipping materials from our neighbors to the North could help protect our forests (and theirs), <a href="http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/coalition-of-unlikely-partners-urges-us-government-to-prevent-entry-of-invasive-plant-pests-from-canada-116478078.html">read this release! </a></p> <style type="text/css"></style> Pests in the News Canada crates invasive species ISPM 15 pallets plant pests wood packaging Wed, 23 Feb 2011 19:30:29 +0000 L. Greenwood 687 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Winter and Firewood http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/winter-and-firewood.html <p>We've just launched a campaign to get some attention to the issue of firewood by people that do winter sports- things like skiing, snowshoeing, and all sorts of fun stuff in the snow. To that end, we have a new page <a href="http://dontmovefirewood.org/wintersports">dedicated to winter sports</a>- and excitedly- our press outreach has already begun to reap some rewards in the form of this article on <a href="http://www.masterskier.com/newsarticle.asp?aid=673">Master Skiier Journal</a> for cross country skiing enthusiasts.</p> <p> </p> <p>For more updates, keep an eye on our <a href="http://twitter.com/dntmovefirewood">Twitter</a> and <a href="http://www.facebook.com/DontMoveFirewood">Facebook</a> accounts, too. We try to update those at least a couple times a week!</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates cross country skiing fire firewood skiing snow snowshoeing snowshoes winter sports Thu, 17 Feb 2011 18:07:13 +0000 L. Greenwood 688 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Lurking in the Trees now on iTunes (and YouTube!) http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/lurking-trees-now-itunes-and-youtube.html <p>Have you ever seen the documentary Lurking in the Trees? Made with the help of many people involved in Don't Move Firewood, this documentary shows the effects that a pest (in this case, the Asian longhorned beetle) can have on a city.</p> <p> </p> <p>And now, you can watch the WHOLE THING on YouTube, or on iTunes... click on one of these two links below, and you'll see it!</p> <p> </p> <p>YouTube version of <a href="http://www.youtube.com/dontmovefirewood#p/a/u/0/BbxsJj68Ezc">Lurking in the Trees</a></p> <p>iTunes (free!) version of <a href="http://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/lurking-in-the-trees/id418097077?i=90937521">Lurking in the Trees</a></p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates asian longhorned beetle itunes lurking in the trees youtube Thu, 10 Feb 2011 21:43:56 +0000 L. Greenwood 689 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org An artist poses a question http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/artist-poses-question.html <p>Can material used for wood based artworks pose a threat? It sure can, but maybe not the way you are thinking. Here's the latest in the Dear Don't Move Firewood series.</p> <p> </p> <p><i>Dear Don't Move Firewood,</i></p> <p><i><br /></i></p> <p><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <w:WordDocument> <w:View>Normal</w:View> <w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom> <w:TrackMoves /> <w:TrackFormatting /> <w:PunctuationKerning /> <w:ValidateAgainstSchemas /> <w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid> <w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent> <w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText> <w:DoNotPromoteQF /> <w:LidThemeOther>EN-US</w:LidThemeOther> <w:LidThemeAsian>X-NONE</w:LidThemeAsian> <w:LidThemeComplexScript>X-NONE</w:LidThemeComplexScript> <w:Compatibility> <w:BreakWrappedTables /> <w:SnapToGridInCell /> <w:WrapTextWithPunct /> <w:UseAsianBreakRules /> <w:DontGrowAutofit /> <w:SplitPgBreakAndParaMark /> <w:DontVertAlignCellWithSp /> <w:DontBreakConstrainedForcedTables /> <w:DontVertAlignInTxbx /> <w:Word11KerningPairs /> <w:CachedColBalance /> </w:Compatibility> <w:DoNotOptimizeForBrowser /> 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--><!--[endif]--><!--[endif]--></p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><i>I make wooden writing pens on a lathe, using 3/4 x 3/4 x 4 inch pieces of wood. I can dunk the entire piece of wood in a liquid (denatured alcohol or?) overnight before I turn it. Will this kill all the pests or what liquid can I use?</i></p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><i><br /></i></p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><i>Thanks, </i></p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><i><br /></i></p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><i>Allen</i></p> <p class="MsoPlainText"> </p> <p class="MsoPlainText">Dear Allen,</p> <p class="MsoPlainText"> </p> <p class="MsoPlainText">For almost all pests, the size of the wood that you are using (3/4" by 3/4") is sufficiently small that it would be impossible for a pest to live in there. Certainly there are a few tiny things that could survive in such a piece (ambrosia beetles, walnut twig beetle, fungal spores), but the chances are low. Further, because you are then turning these pieces on a lathe, the risk is even more reduced.</p> <p class="MsoPlainText"> </p> <p class="MsoPlainText">Now, if you are also including parts with natural bark attached, the area with bark could be an issue for harboring minute pests. My guess is that with pens, you are going for a smooth wood product in the hand, so probably bark isn't a problem.</p> <p class="MsoPlainText"> </p> <p class="MsoPlainText">To conclude, your finished products are most likely extremely safe without any liquid soaking treatment.</p> <p class="MsoPlainText"> </p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><b>But a real problem</b> may lie not in your product, but your raw material. Where are you getting the wood for your products? Is it delivered in a log or rough cut form? Is it from nearby, or are you buying it from various places, far away? I hope you are using wood from your own property, or a local supply.</p> <p class="MsoPlainText"> </p> <p class="MsoPlainText">It might interest you to know that <a href="http://www.thousandcankerdisease.com/">Thousand Cankers Disease</a> of Walnut is a disease that is thought to spread via unfinished wood (logs, burls, etc) that is destined for things like inlays and gunstocks. Of course, the final product (jewelry box, or a reproduction rifle) isn't a direct threat to trees, but the movement of untreated wood can be.</p> <p class="MsoPlainText"> </p> <p class="MsoPlainText">This is a great question, and a complicated answer. Thanks for contacting us!</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates artist ask don't move firewood dear don't move firewood lathe pen pencil Mon, 31 Jan 2011 18:39:55 +0000 L. Greenwood 690 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org A blog worth repeating http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/blog-worth-repeating.html <div class="field field-type-text field-field-sub-title"> <div class="field-label">Sub Title:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> don&#039;t move firewood, free stuff, giveaways </div> </div> </div> <p>I was looking through our archives when I saw one of my blog entries from last August, titled "<a href="/blog/what-does-dont-move-firewood-do.html">What does Don't Move Firewood do</a>?"</p> <p> </p> <p>So I thought I'd review it and see if we still do all the same stuff. And the answer is... yes! So here it is, in case you missed it last summer...</p> <p> </p> <p>--------------------------------------------</p> <p> </p> <p>Don’t Move Firewood isn’t just a single website. We are constantly changing and diversifying our outreach methods to reach more people in more places. So what do we really do?</p> <p> </p> <p><b>We give away stuff. Lots of stuff.</b></p> <p> </p> <p>Don’t Move Firewood gives away thousands and thousands of stickers, magnets, window clings, fake tattoos, and DVDs every year to fellow outreach professionals. Staffing a booth about firewood regulations at the state fair? Teaching a master gardener’s class? Going to the big annual boy scout gathering in your state? We have some stickers waiting for you! All you have to do is ask. Check out our<a href="/content/become-collaborator"> assortment of stuff here</a>.</p> <p><b><br /></b></p> <p><b>We can make customized materials, just for you.</b></p> <p> </p> <p>All over the country, state and federal agencies as well as non-profits and trade groups are getting the word out about the risk of moving firewood. Rather than reinventing the wheel, groups are increasing coming to us for free design services. We’ve made a huge variety of products in the last few years- billboards, posters, banners, postcards, online ads, printed ads, beach balls, fake tattoos, mailing slips, stickers, hats, teeshirts, vests, frisbees, paper fans, even a fully customized deck of cards. We do all the design work and take care of a lot of the technical details with your chosen vendor- all you have to do is work with us to agree on the look and wording, and then you pay for the creation of the final product. In most cases, this will save you thousands of dollars of design fees, while aligning your project with our nationally recognized look, feel, and brand. It’s a great deal.</p> <p>Recently, we’ve made customized products for; CT, ID, MA, MO, MT, NH, NY, OR, PA, VT, WA, and WI. And we have upcoming ideas that we are exploring with new collaborators in CO, SC and TN. So if you want something made, you’ll be in good company. To see some of the stuff we've made in the past, visit our <a href="/content/become-collaborator">collaborator page</a>.</p> <p> </p> <p><b><a href="http://twitter.com/dntmovefirewood">Twitter</a>! <a href="http://www.facebook.com/DontMoveFirewood">Facebook</a>! <a href="http://www.youtube.com/user/dontmovefirewood">YouTube</a>! <a href="/blog.html">Blogging</a>!</b></p> <p> </p> <p>We spread our message through all the newest and most effective online tools. We have a <a href="http://twitter.com/dntmovefirewood">twitter account</a>, a <a href="http://www.facebook.com/DontMoveFirewood">facebook account</a>, and a <a href="http://www.youtube.com/user/dontmovefirewood">YouTube channel </a>with our full assortment of funny and educational videos. We even have a facebook game- <a href="http://www.shredapest.org/">Shred a pest</a>- that lets you try to kill cartoonish forest pests by fire, water, vicious insults or wood chipper. Check it out!</p> <p> </p> <p>And we blog. Occasionally we do guest blogs- so if you ever want to publicize something cool about your own efforts to educate the public about not moving firewood, email me, Leigh, at Lgreenwood at TNC dot org, and I’ll work with you to get something on our site.</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Thu, 27 Jan 2011 22:02:40 +0000 L. Greenwood 691 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Don't Move Unsafe Firewood http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/dont-move-unsafe-firewood.html <p>Is Don't Move Firewood a misnomer? Should it be Don't Move Unsafe Firewood? Here's the original email that I got yesterday... and my response.</p> <p> </p> <p><i>Dear Don't Move Firewood,</i></p> <p><i><br /></i></p> <p><i>I support this effort to protect the forests but have an issue that it is "Don't Move Firewood" and not "Don't Move Unsafe Firewood". I found papers on this and 4hours with core temp of 160F seems the standard for safely sterilizing wood for transport and use at any location. As restrictions on transporting firewood become move beyond just recommendations to not do it, you need to make sure and define what constitutes the rules for making wood safe. </i></p> <p><i><br /></i></p> <p><i>Best Regards, </i></p> <p><i>Roger</i></p> <p> </p> <p>Dear Roger,</p> <p> </p> <p>You are right, moving certain kinds of commercially heat treated firewood is not a threat to our forests. And you are right, as we move into more regulations, more rules, more quarantines and generally more restrictions, it is important to delve deeper into the issue of what is safe and what is not.</p> <p> </p> <p>However, I do feel it is important to know that the vast, enormous, majority of firewood out there is entirely untreated. Not dried, not kiln dried, nothing. So while of course high and prolonged heat will kill everything in the wood, the issue is really that such treatment is very rare, and thus the problem is severe.</p> <p> </p> <p>Compounding the issue is the fact that some heat treatments are actually ineffective on certain pests. Pests that burrow really, really deep into the wood can survive some fairly impressive heat regimes. One example is that the current USDA APHIS standard for wood moving out of an Emerald ash borer quarantine area is 60 minutes at 60 degrees Centigrade in the core of the log. That's fine- except that there is no study to show if that heating requirement will kill Asian longhorned beetle larvae. So that wood may still pose a threat- despite being heat treated according to USDA-APHIS specifications.</p> <p> </p> <p>Confusing, and frustrating. And messages to the public at large are best accepted if they are simple and straightforward. So we stick to our Don't Move Firewood, and when people ask, we tell them- commercially kiln dried wood is heated for a long time, to a very high temperature, a specification that far exceeds most other standards for wood drying. This wood is considered safer than other kinds of wood, and if you must move firewood, make it kiln dried.</p> <p> </p> <p>As always, thanks for asking!</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates ask don't move firewood don't move firewood firewood safety heat treatment kiln dried Wed, 26 Jan 2011 19:19:39 +0000 L. Greenwood 692 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Thanks, Martha Stewart Living Radio! http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/thanks-martha-stewart-living-radio.html <p>Today I had the honor and pleasure of being on Martha Stewart's satellite radio station, during the morning "Morning Living" program. The two hosts, Betsy and Kim, were very engaging and made it a very fun and educational interview.We talked about getting firewood from a local source, the threat of insects like Gypsy moth and others, and I even remembered to mention our blog!</p> <p> </p> <p>You may recall this is the second time Martha Stewart has included us in her materials- the first was <a href="/blog/martha-stewart-magazine-mentions-dont-move-firewood.html">a brief mention</a> in her magazine this past fall.</p> <p> </p> <p>Of course, Don't Move Firewood is a big fan of anyone that brings our message directly to their audience, so I'd just like to say- Thanks Martha! We really appreciate the opportunity to educate your readers and listeners!</p> <p> </p> <p>Clips of the interview are not yet available, but you can see the schedule and learn more about the radio spot here: <a href="http://www.marthastewart.com/portal/site/mslo/menuitem.4af27a8e9e64e1611e3bf410b5900aa0/?vgnextoid=969dcd0fc8b40110VgnVCM1000003d370a0aRCRD&amp;vgnextfmt=default">Martha Stewart's radio show, Morning Living</a></p> <style type="text/css"></style> Awards and Recognition firewood gypsy moth martha stewart martha stewart living morning living radio sirius Thu, 13 Jan 2011 18:11:17 +0000 L. Greenwood 693 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Guest blog from Alliance for Green Heat http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/guest-blog-alliance-green-heat.html <p>Today we are featuring a guest blog from John Ackerly, the president of the non-profit <a href="http://www.forgreenheat.org">Alliance for Green Heat</a>.</p> <p>John writes;</p> <p><b>National Parks Need to Require Concessions to Sell Dry Firewood</b></p> <p>Last summer I was camping with my three-year-old son in Virginia’s Shenandoah National Park. Since I head up the Alliance for Green Heat, a non-profit dedicated to clean and responsible wood burning, I was very familiar with pests such as Emerald Ash Borer and we planned to buy our firewood at the campground. I noticed right away that the campground was full of wood smoke and soon found out why: the concession selling firewood only had wet wood.</p> <p>I brought it home and measured it with a moisture meter and got readings of 30% - 40% moisture content. Firewood should be under 20% and kiln dried firewood is often closer to 10%.</p> <p>I then wrote to the Park Superintendent, asking whether there were local or national regulations requiring concessions sell seasoned firewood in parks. I told her that it would be harder to convince campers to leave their wood at home if they don’t know whether dry wood will be available. I got a very nice reply expressing regret over my smoky experience but no answer about any regulations, which leads me to believe that there aren’t any.</p> <p>Campgrounds are full of kids. Dense smoke doesn’t make for a fun camping experience, and is not healthy, especially for kids. If we want to encourage people to buy firewood at their campgrounds, the firewood sold should be a good quality product- not a wet and smoky one.</p> <p>John Ackerly, <br /> President<br /> <a href="http://www.forgreenheat.org"><span>Alliance for Green Heat</span></a></p> <style type="text/css"></style> Alliance for Green Heat campfires campground host Emerald ash borer John Acklerly shenandoah virginia wood heat Tue, 11 Jan 2011 17:38:32 +0000 L. Greenwood 694 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Wood price question from a visitor http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/wood-price-question-visitor.html <p>Another in our "Ask Don't Move Firewood" series!</p> <p> </p> <p><i>Dear Don't Move Firewood-</i></p> <p><i><br /></i></p> <p><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <w:WordDocument> <w:View>Normal</w:View> <w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom> <w:TrackMoves /> <w:TrackFormatting /> <w:PunctuationKerning /> <w:ValidateAgainstSchemas /> <w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid> <w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent> <w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText> <w:DoNotPromoteQF /> <w:LidThemeOther>EN-US</w:LidThemeOther> <w:LidThemeAsian>X-NONE</w:LidThemeAsian> <w:LidThemeComplexScript>X-NONE</w:LidThemeComplexScript> <w:Compatibility> <w:BreakWrappedTables /> <w:SnapToGridInCell /> <w:WrapTextWithPunct /> <w:UseAsianBreakRules /> <w:DontGrowAutofit /> <w:SplitPgBreakAndParaMark /> <w:DontVertAlignCellWithSp /> 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mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} --><!--[if gte mso 10]> <mce:style><! /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} --><!--[endif]--><!--[endif]--></p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><i>Have you explored the issue of the cost of buying wood in recreational settings? Constantly rising prices in every facet of recreational camping are making the one activity we could afford as a family nearly out of reach...and now this?<span> </span>I agree with your purpose.<span> </span>Make firewood available at affordable prices in the campgrounds. Ah, the good old days...</i></p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><i><br /></i></p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><i>Yours, </i></p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><i><br /></i></p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><i>Steve in Oregon</i></p> <p class="MsoPlainText"> </p> <p class="MsoPlainText">Dear Steve-</p> <p class="MsoPlainText"> </p> <p class="MsoPlainText">I completely agree. The cost of firewood at some campsites is absolutely a barrier to the right behavior (buying wood locally). Lowering the cost of wood at many campsites throughout a region could increasing the number of people that don't transport firewood. However, regrettably, that is not within the power of Don't Move Firewood- it is more in the power of YOU as a consumer and camper. Tell your campgrounds that they need to price their wood competitively. Tell your Department of Agriculture that this is a problem for your local forests' health. And most of all- call ahead. Maybe the corner store a mile away, and not the campground itself, has decently priced wood. Give your money to them, and still keep trees safe.</p> <p class="MsoPlainText"> </p> <p class="MsoPlainText">Thanks for asking.</p> <p class="MsoPlainText"> </p> <p class="MsoPlainText"> </p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates camping don't move firewood wood prices wood supply Tue, 04 Jan 2011 22:17:34 +0000 L. Greenwood 695 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org EAB University starting back up http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/eab-university-starting-back.html <p>Want to learn more about forest pests from the comfort of your own home? Emerald Ash Borer University is the place for you!</p> <p> </p> <p>Brought to the internet by several universities (Michigan State University, Ohio State University and Purdue University), EAB University offers classes in all sorts of topics related to Emerald Ash Borer impacts, treatment, prevention and more.</p> <p> </p> <p>Please visit the EAB University page here,<a href="http://www.emeraldashborer.info/eab_university.cfm"> http://www.emeraldashborer.info/eab_university.cfm</a>, to learn more. The first webinar will be January 6th, so don't delay!</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates eab university EABU Emerald ash borer firewood purdue university Tue, 28 Dec 2010 19:15:09 +0000 L. Greenwood 696 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Activity book for kids! http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/activity-book-kids.html <p>Kids are very influential- they often are the first member of the family to know about a new idea or thing that you should or should not do. Accordingly, Don't Move Firewood is trying to do more in the coming year for the littlest firewood users.</p> <p> </p> <p>Before we roll out our new original materials, I figured I would highlight one particularly good item for kids that already is out there- the <a href="http://dnr.state.il.us/ORC/urbanforestry/ActivityBook-Maryland.pdf">Emerald Ash Borer Fun Activity Book!</a> This is a pdf that you can download. The original version came from Purdue University, and this particular one is modified slightly for the University of Maryland Home and Garden Information Center.</p> <p> </p> <p>Check out the booklet here!</p> <p><a href="http://dnr.state.il.us/ORC/urbanforestry/ActivityBook-Maryland.pdf">http://dnr.state.il.us/ORC/urbanforestry/ActivityBook-Maryland.pdf</a></p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates don't move firewood EAB Emerald ash borer purdue Mon, 20 Dec 2010 18:44:50 +0000 L. Greenwood 697 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Great firewood article in Tennessee http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/great-firewood-article-tennessee.html <p>At least one great article came out of our recent press release for Don't Move Firewood- The Tennessean featured a story named <a href="http://www.tennessean.com/article/20101216/NEWS01/101216050/Using-firewood-from-more-than-50-miles-away-can-harm-TN-trees">Using firewood from more than 50 miles away can harm TN trees</a>. The article has a lot of good suggestions and used a lot of material from our press release. I was quite pleased to also see that this article included some practical information for Tennessee residents about local pest infestations and applicable quarantines (in Anderson, Blount, Knox, Loudon and Union county of Tennessee.)</p> <p> </p> <p>Good work by all, and special thanks to the <a href="http://www.nature.org/wherewework/northamerica/states/tennessee/">Tennessee Chapter</a> of <a href="http://www.nature.org/">The Nature Conservancy</a> for their help!</p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <style type="text/css"></style> Pests in the News EAB Emerald ash borer firewood Tennessee thousand cankers disease TN walnut winter fires Fri, 17 Dec 2010 17:42:59 +0000 L. Greenwood 698 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Our latest press release is out! http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/our-latest-press-release-out.html <p>Attention all you Don't Move Firewood supporters! We put a press release out nationwide today to alert the public of the need to heat their homes this winter with wood from local supplies.</p> <p> </p> <p>Below is the body of the release, for reference. Let's all hope that tomorrow and Friday this blog is full of exciting mentions of all the press we got!</p> <p> </p> <p>--------------------</p> <p> </p> <p>STOCKING UP ON WOOD FOR WINTER CAN KILL TREES</p> <p> </p> <p>Thirty-five percent of firewood is brought from another location, increasing risk of invasion from forest pests</p> <p> </p> <p>Arlington, VA—Dec. 15 2010–As winter arrives, people across the country are engaging in a centuries-old tradition of buying or gathering firewood to fuel home fires. In a recent poll conducted by The Nature Conservancy, one in twenty Americans said they moved firewood long distances (i.e., more than 50 miles, a distance widely accepted as moving it “too far”).</p> <p> </p> <p>Moving firewood can increase the risk of new invasive pest infestations that kill trees. To prevent the spread of these pests, the Don’t Move Firewood campaign recommends buying firewood that was cut locally, preferably within the same county or region of where it will be burned.</p> <p> </p> <p>Transporting firewood can potentially create new infestations of invasive insects and diseases, which can lurk in firewood at any time of the year. These tree-killing pests cannot move far on their own, but when people move firewood that harbors them, they unwittingly enable these pests to start an infestation far from their current range. Past invaders have devastated native species of trees such as the American chestnut, hemlock, and American elm- tree species which have been part of American forests and city streets for centuries prior to invasion of foreign pests.</p> <p> </p> <p>“These new poll results tell us that when people learn why they shouldn’t transport firewood long distances, the vast majority are willing to buy it where they burn it,” said Leigh Greenwood, Don’t Move Firewood campaign manager, The Nature Conservancy. “People have the power to save their trees. They can help stop the spread of destructive pests by not moving firewood and communicating this message to others.”</p> <p> </p> <p>The poll results indicate that only 34 percent of the respondents who use firewood have heard that they should not move firewood long distances; however, once they are aware of the problem, 80 percent would be willing to buy the wood in the area where they plan to burn it. In regions of the country hardest hit by invasive pests, the number of people who have heard the message to not move firewood has increased from 38 percent in 2007, when the poll was previously conducted, to 59 percent in this year’s poll results. In these same regions, from 2007 to 2010 the poll indicates there has been a 13 percent increase in the number of people that say they never move firewood.</p> <p> </p> <p>In Worcester, MA, more than 28,000 trees have been removed due to the invasion of the Asian longhorned beetle (ALB), turning Worcester’s once canopied streets into stark naked roadways. Experts think a small ALB infestation discovered and controlled this past summer in Boston may have been from beetles that escaped out of Worcester, potentially on firewood or brush.</p> <p> </p> <p>“Burning a wood fire in the winter has a lot of different uses – a primary heat source, a place for a family gathering, or part of a romantic evening by the fire,” said Greenwood. “When firewood comes from a well managed local forest, it’s a great alternative to using fossil fuels like oil and natural gas. We just ask that when using firewood for these purposes, people help protect their local trees by not risking the accidental movement of insects and diseases that can wipe out entire forests.”</p> <p> </p> <p>Following are tips from the Don’t Move Firewood campaign:</p> <p> </p> <ul> <li>Obtain firewood near the location where you will burn it – that means the wood was cut in a nearby forest, in the same county, or at a maximum of 50 miles from where you'll have your fire.</li> <li></li> <li>Don’t be tempted to get firewood from a remote location just because the wood looks clean and healthy. It could still harbor tiny insect eggs or microscopic fungal spores that will start a new and deadly infestation of forest pests.</li> <li> </li> <li>Aged or seasoned wood is not considered safe to move, but commercially kiln-dried wood is a good option if you must transport firewood. </li> <li></li> <li>If you have already moved firewood, and you now know you need to dispose of it safely, burn it soon and completely. Make sure to rake the storage area carefully and also burn the debris. In the future, buy from a local source. </li> <li></li> <li>Tell your friends and others about the risks of moving firewood – no one wants to be responsible for starting a new pest infestation. <p> </p> </li> </ul> <style type="text/css"></style> cord of firewood don't move firewood firewood use press release winter heating Wed, 15 Dec 2010 22:14:18 +0000 L. Greenwood 699 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Christmas trees and wreathes http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/christmas-trees-and-wreathes.html <p>Shopping for the perfect Christmas tree, wreath, or garland this year? We have a few tips here at Don&#39;t Move Firewood to ensure you are not putting your local trees at risk from your holiday decorations.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>- Whenever possible, buy locally harvested trees and other decorations. This means the materials were cut from trees within your county, or at the very most, within 50 miles of your house.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>- Regardless of if you can buy locally or not, dispose of your decorations at the end of the season carefully. Don&#39;t just dump stuff in the backyard to rot- if there are pests or pathogens in it, that could make it even easier for the bugs to spread!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The following are two excellent disposal options</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>---- Bring all natural materials to a local tree composting dropoff point. Where I live, they advertise these locations on the radio throughout January. If that isn&#39;t the case where you live, perhaps try a google search for &quot;christmas tree disposal&quot; and your state or city name.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>---- If you cannot find a local tree composting facility, then the best option is to drop it off at the landfill. It doesn&#39;t sound nice, but the other option (leaving it in your yard to decompose) is definitely worse.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates buy local christmas christmas trees christmas wreathes don't move firewood forest pests garlands Wed, 01 Dec 2010 17:48:21 +0000 L. Greenwood 700 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org It is snowing outside http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/it-snowing-outside.html-0 <p>I'm watching it snow out the office window and thinking about wood heat. Burning wood to heat your home is sustainable, usually inexpensive, and convenient. So I figured I'd remind everyone that Don't Move Firewood isn't against the use of firewood. Or wood heat, or wood stoves, or outdoor burners, or fireplaces, or campfires, or anything. We like a good warm fire like everyone else.</p> <p> </p> <p>What we are advocating is the use of wood from only local sources. Getting a shipment of wood for the winter that is from hundreds of miles away is risky, and in some places it is illegal, too. The right thing to do is to talk with your wood vendor, and make sure that the wood you are buying is from a nearby source. Some states, for example New York, require that firewood be sold with a certificate of source. That makes it easier on the consumer to find out where the wood comes from.</p> <p> </p> <p>So by all means, stock up on wood for the winter. Just get that wood from a forest near you!</p> <p> </p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates cord firewood snow winter wood heat wood stove Tue, 16 Nov 2010 22:18:25 +0000 L. Greenwood 707 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org It is snowing outside http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/it-snowing-outside.html <p>I'm watching it snow out the office window and thinking about wood heat. Burning wood to heat your home is sustainable, usually inexpensive, and convenient. So I figured I'd remind everyone that Don't Move Firewood isn't against the use of firewood. Or wood heat, or wood stoves, or outdoor burners, or fireplaces, or campfires, or anything. We like a good warm fire like everyone else.</p> <p> </p> <p>What we are advocating is the use of wood from only local sources. Getting a shipment of wood for the winter that is from hundreds of miles away is risky, and in some places it is illegal, too. The right thing to do is to talk with your wood vendor, and make sure that the wood you are buying is from a nearby source. Some states, for example New York, require that firewood be sold with a certificate of source. That makes it easier on the consumer to find out where the wood comes from.</p> <p> </p> <p>So by all means, stock up on wood for the winter. Just get that wood from a forest near you!</p> <p> </p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates cord firewood snow winter wood heat wood stove Tue, 16 Nov 2010 22:18:25 +0000 L. Greenwood 701 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Getting information about the legality of moving firewood http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/getting-information-about-legality-moving-firewood.html <p>In some parts of the country, it is illegal to move firewood of any kind. In other places, only some types of wood are legally restricted. And in other places, there are no rules at all. It is confusing, of course.</p> <p> </p> <p>This brings me to a recent question I got from Carmen, a visitor to this site. The place names on this email have been slightly changed to make it anonymous.</p> <p> </p> <p><i>Dear Don't Move Firewood,</i></p> <p><i><br /></i></p> <p><style>table.MsoNormalTable { font-size: 11pt; font-family: "Calibri","sans-serif"; }</style></p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><i>I run a maintenance dept at Smith Center, a facility in Woodbridge NJ. I have a contractor cutting down trees and I'm not sure if the tree trunks can be moved from the facility by others to burn. We were in the quarantine zone at one time, but not sure if the quarantine zone is still viable. Thank You for your help.</i></p> <p class="MsoPlainText"> </p> <p class="MsoPlainText">Dear Carmen,</p> <p class="MsoPlainText"> </p> <p class="MsoPlainText">By far the easiest and fastest way to get an answer to this kind of question is to look up your local State Plant Health Director and call them up. Visit <a href="http://www.aphis.usda.gov/services/report_pest_disease/report_pest_disease.shtml">this map of all 50 states</a> to figure out who to call. They'll either have the answer on hand, or be able to tell you where to go next.</p> <p class="MsoPlainText"> </p> <p class="MsoPlainText">If you know that a certain pest is a particular issue in your area, you can also search around on <a href="http://www.emeraldashborer.info/">emeraldashborer.info</a> (for emerald ash borer) or <a href="http://www.beetlebusters.info/">beetlebusters.info</a> (for Asian longhorned beetle). Those sites are also very helpful.</p> <p class="MsoPlainText"> </p> <p class="MsoPlainText"> </p> <p class="MsoPlainText"> </p> <style type="text/css"></style> Quarantines ALB asian longhorned beetle don't move firewood EAB Emerald ash borer quarantine zones wood movement wood waste Tue, 02 Nov 2010 20:32:20 +0000 L. Greenwood 702 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Martha Stewart Magazine mentions Don't Move Firewood! http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/martha-stewart-magazine-mentions-dont-move-firewood.html <p>Don't Move Firewood is mentioned in the November 2010 publication of Martha Stewart Living, and we sure are proud!</p> <p> </p> <p>On page 162 of this month's Martha Stewart Living (available on news stands now!), Don't Move Firewood is listed as a resource for <i>What You Can Do</i> to help fight, as they call it, arboreal blights. Here at Don't Move Firewood, we tend to say just plain old "tree-killing insects and diseases" but however you want to phrase it, it is exciting.</p> <p> </p> <p>The article itself, named <i>The Root of the Matter</i>, is a good one. It talks about native and non-native tree killing pests, how things get into the country, how they spread, and what people are doing about it. I think it is a good piece that informs the hugely broad and widespread readership of this magazine.</p> <p> </p> <p>So, welcome, Martha Stewart Living readers! Please check out our website, and thanks for learning more about better firewood use and how to keep your beautiful native trees and landscaping plants safe from diseases and insects.</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Pests in the News beautiful native trees martha stewart martha stewart living martha stewart magazine marthastewart.com the root of the matter tree health Mon, 01 Nov 2010 18:13:57 +0000 L. Greenwood 703 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org When does Don't Move Firewood matter? http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/when-does-dont-move-firewood-matter.html <p>All the time, everywhere.</p> <p> </p> <p>No, seriously. Don't Move Firewood isn't about a place, or a bug, or a tree in particular. It isn't even about a given ecosystem. Heck- it is not even about native trees. It is about human behavior.</p> <p> </p> <p>Do you cover your mouth when you sneeze, even if you don't think you have a cold? Sure you do- it is the right thing to do. Likewise, it doesn't matter if you think that your firewood is probably free of forest pests. You still shouldn't move it very far.</p> <p> </p> <p>Right now, people move firewood, and firewood is what can move forest pests far and wide, and that is a problem. Without the movement of firewood, most forest pest infestations would stay small, and have a chance of either very effective management or eradication.</p> <p> </p> <p>But, you say, there are no forest pest infestations where I live, so my firewood must be safe to move, right? Remember that sneeze? So, the answer is no. Forest pests can be subtle. They can go years without being discovered in an area- even decades in some cases.</p> <p> </p> <p>And some native forest pests cause serious damage when moved into new territory- like the gold spotted oak borer being relocated from AZ to CA, for instance. That moves around on firewood. Or mountain pine beetle that killed both native and non-native street trees in the middle of downtown Bozeman. That moved on firewood, too.</p> <p> </p> <p>Don't get caught up in "my state has no quarantine" or "my trees all look so healthy." It really isn't about that. It is more about doing the right thing, all the time.</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates campaign don't move firewood federal quarantines states Wed, 27 Oct 2010 19:17:41 +0000 L. Greenwood 704 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Tips on wood disposal http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/tips-wood-disposal.html <p>New to the idea of not moving firewood? Staring out the back window of your home or cabin at a stack of firewood that you now know might be a huge potential hazard to the health of your local trees? We can help.</p> <p> </p> <p>Your next steps depend on one simple question- <b>is the wood from in and around your property? Or was it brought in from far away?</b></p> <p> </p> <p>If it is from in and around your property, it likely poses no threat to your trees, or to anyone else's trees, <i>as long as you don't move it very far</i>. Letting it rot is totally fine. Chipping it to use as mulch under your shrubs is a good idea. Burning it in your stove or fire pit could be fun and practical. Even bringing it to a nearby landfill or composting facility is OK, as long as that facility is right in your town. The problem would be if you take it to your cabin a few counties away, or if you stack it on the roadside for strangers to pick up and take it to who-knows-where. That's the kind of thing you want to avoid- moving it far poses a risk to the trees in that new location.</p> <p> </p> <p>Now, if that wood you are looking at is from far away, it might be contaminated with forest pests or diseases. These are often impossible to see, so don't just trust yourself to inspect the wood. The best option for disposing of firewood that has already been moved is to burn it. In an ideal world, you'd invite over a few friends for an evening, buy some marshmallows, chocolate and graham crackers, and have a large bonfire to burn it all at once. Festive, quick, and effective!</p> <p> </p> <p>If that isn't feasible (it may not be legal or practical to have a bonfire, depending on where you live) another option would be to burn it more slowly through more typical means- like a wood stove. Most important would be to burn it completely well before spring arrives, and to ensure you carefully rake the site right down to the dirt to get any straggling bark, twigs, or little chips.</p> <p> </p> <p>If you've been bringing in firewood from long distances for years now, it really might be in your best interest to call someone to have your trees inspected for pests. <a href="http://www.aphis.usda.gov/services/report_pest_disease/report_pest_disease.shtml">Check out this map</a> to find your local <a href="http://www.aphis.usda.gov/services/report_pest_disease/report_pest_disease.shtml">State Plant Health Director office</a>- they can direct you to the right authority to have someone come look at your trees.</p> <p> </p> <p>And lastly, be safe in the future. When you cut or collect wood on your property, just use it there- don't move it. And remember- bonfires are only a stopgap measure to help you correct the mistake of moving firewood. From now on, only buy locally cut and sourced wood. A general rule of thumb is 50 miles from the source, but closer is always better. Support local businesses and keep your trees safe- don't move firewood.</p> <p> </p> <style type="text/css"></style> firewood martha stewart living tips on wood disposal wood disposal Mon, 25 Oct 2010 16:28:25 +0000 L. Greenwood 705 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org A firewood restrictions question http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/firewood-restrictions-question.html <p>A reader, Bill, asked us recently...</p> <p><i><br /></i></p> <p><i>Dear Don't Move Firewood</i></p> <p><i><br /></i></p> <p><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <w:WordDocument> <w:View>Normal</w:View> <w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom> <w:TrackMoves /> <w:TrackFormatting /> <w:PunctuationKerning /> <w:ValidateAgainstSchemas /> <w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid> <w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent> <w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText> <w:DoNotPromoteQF /> <w:LidThemeOther>EN-US</w:LidThemeOther> <w:LidThemeAsian>X-NONE</w:LidThemeAsian> <w:LidThemeComplexScript>X-NONE</w:LidThemeComplexScript> <w:Compatibility> <w:BreakWrappedTables /> <w:SnapToGridInCell /> <w:WrapTextWithPunct /> <w:UseAsianBreakRules /> <w:DontGrowAutofit /> <w:SplitPgBreakAndParaMark /> <w:DontVertAlignCellWithSp /> 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mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} --><!--[if gte mso 10]> <mce:style><! /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} --><!--[endif]--><!--[endif]--></p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><i>Do any eastern states, specifically PA,NJ, and NY have regulations about importing out of state logs, firewood, or hardwood mulch? Thank you.</i></p> <p class="MsoPlainText"> </p> <p class="MsoPlainText">Bill-</p> <p class="MsoPlainText"> </p> <p class="MsoPlainText">Absolutely. In fact, an increasing number of states throughout the US are putting regulations into place on the interstate movement of firewood, logs, and mulch. Without getting into the deep dark details of the legalities and regulations, I can tell you this; New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvannia all regulate some of the commodities (logs, firewood, and mulch) that you mention.</p> <p class="MsoPlainText"> </p> <p class="MsoPlainText">Because of the large fines and legal questions potentially involved, I'm going to refrain from summing up each state. I'd urge you to investigate on your own, please. Here is a starting point for you for NY and PA. NJ's regulation is currently under review, as I understand it, and thus not available online.</p> <p class="MsoPlainText"> </p> <p class="MsoPlainText">New York, <a href="http://www.dec.ny.gov/regs/4079.html#44382">192.5 Firewood restrictions to protect forests from invasive species</a></p> <p>Pennsylvania, <a href="http://www.pabulletin.com/secure/data/vol40/40-3/108.html">40 Pa.B. 441, PA Order of Quarantine </a></p> <p class="MsoPlainText"> </p> <style type="text/css"></style> Quarantines firewood interstate firewood regulation new jersey new york NJ NY PA pennsylvania Fri, 15 Oct 2010 19:22:49 +0000 L. Greenwood 706 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org We have giveaways! http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/we-have-giveaways.html <p>Do you do outreach events with campers, students, RV enthusiasts, hunters, gardeners, birdwatchers, or anyone else that either uses firewood or looks at trees? Well then... we might have something for you!</p> <p> </p> <p>Don't Move Firewood keeps a stockpile of inexpensive giveaways for your outreach efforts. All you have to do is let us know what you will need it for, and what you might want- we have stickers, magnets, car clings, and sometimes other stuff, too.</p> <p> </p> <p>And so when I see this from a woman named Maryanne...</p> <p><i><br /></i></p> <p><i>Dear Don't Move Firewood-<br /></i></p> <p><i><br /></i></p> <p> </p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><i>I am a small educational program, designed to teach children about trees. We looking for any small give aways about tree education. Thanks.</i></p> <p class="MsoPlainText"> </p> <p class="MsoPlainText">I am happy to reply with this...</p> <p class="MsoPlainText"> </p> <p class="MsoPlainText">Maryanne-</p> <p class="MsoPlainText"> </p> <p class="MsoPlainText">Sure! We have stickers, magnets, car clings and more! Let me know what you'll use them for, what your USPS address is, and how many you might want, and we'll send you some inexpensive giveaways for your tree education!</p> <p class="MsoPlainText"> </p> <p class="MsoPlainText">View our materials at the <a href="https://www.dontmovefirewood.org/content/become-collaborator">Collaborators page</a>, and request materials at our <a href="http://dontmovefirewood.org/forms/contact-us.html">Contact Us page</a>, please!</p> <p class="MsoPlainText"> </p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><i><br /></i></p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates clings don't move firewood giveaways fans magnets stickers Tue, 28 Sep 2010 15:58:18 +0000 L. Greenwood 709 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Another wood scrap question http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/another-wood-scrap-question.html <p>A visitor named John has posed a different, but the same, as a <a href="https://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/more-questions-you.html">question I had a few weeks ago</a> about processed wood as firewood. John asks...</p> <p> </p> <p><i>Dear Don't Move Firewood,</i></p> <p><i><br /></i></p> <p> </p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><i>I have saved commerically cut hardwood lumber scraps from pallets and other uses. This is lumber with no bark and not less that one year from the saw mill. Is it a problem?</i></p> <p class="MsoPlainText"> </p> <p class="MsoPlainText">John,</p> <p class="MsoPlainText"> </p> <p class="MsoPlainText">For the most part, commercially cut scraps of hardwood lumber (also called dimensional lumber) are a pretty safe alternative to traditional cut firewood. Particularly if they are bark-free, and are stored indoors, this is a very low risk wood choice.</p> <p class="MsoPlainText"> </p> <p class="MsoPlainText">Pallets, like I've mentioned before, are a little trickier. Because they are often left outside for long periods of time, and are frequently made from low quality (and thus possibly diseased) wood sources, pallet wood scraps are higher risk.</p> <p class="MsoPlainText"> </p> <p class="MsoPlainText">But one thing you didn't mention in your question is if, and how far, you are moving this wood. If you are just getting scraps (legally, I hope!) from a jobsite within 50 miles of where you are burning the wood, then regardless, that is pretty much a fine use of the wood. Remember- the problem isn't truly in the firewood itself, it is in how far you move the material.</p> <p class="MsoPlainText"> </p> <p class="MsoPlainText">Lastly, see my other blog entry along these lines from Daniel back in early August named "<a href="https://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/more-questions-you.html">More questions from you</a>!"</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Outbreaks dimensional lumber firewood lumber pallets Mon, 27 Sep 2010 21:11:41 +0000 L. Greenwood 708 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Great question on acorns http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/great-question-acorns.html <p>Continuing our series on questions from our visitors, here is a good one from Deborah in Connecticut. She asks-</p> <p> </p> <p><i>Dear Don't Move Firewood-</i></p> <p> </p> <p><i>I understand the importance of not moving firewood significant distances due<span></span> to invasive species like the ALB.<span> </span>What are your thoughts on moving acorns?<span> </span></i></p> <p><i>Here in CT, we rake up hundreds of gallons of acorns from our lawn each year.<span> </span>A relative in NH would like the acorns to feed his local wildlife. <span> </span>Is it safe to transport the acorns?<span> </span>Thank you for your input.</i></p> <p> </p> <p>Dear Deborah-</p> <p> </p> <p>I hate to tell you, but transporting those acorns is not a good idea. While there are no known diseases or pests in your area right now that could spread on acorns, it certainly is a real possibility that there is something we don't yet know about. For instance, what if the acorns in CT carried a rare fungus that CT oaks can fend off, but NH oaks are vulnerable? That'd be a very serious issue. And I do want to mention that there are risks to feeding wildlife. One risk is that sometimes, when you feed wildlife, the animals can risk contracting diseases from each other. Sort of like people getting food poisoning on a cruise ship- too many people, too many possible germs. Except it would be something like too many deer, too many deer germs. And I'm sure your relatives don't want to accidentally increase the chance that local wildlife get sick.</p> <p> </p> <p>So to be on the safe side, for the sake of both the oaks and the acorn eaters, please don't bring your acorns up to New Hampshire.</p> <p> </p> <p>But thanks for asking!</p> <p> </p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates dear don't move firewood don't move acorns questions from you Mon, 20 Sep 2010 21:27:27 +0000 L. Greenwood 710 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org I disagree that it is ridiculous http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/i-disagree-it-ridiculous.html <p>Here is a complicated submission I recently received in our "Contact Us" form;</p> <p> </p> <p><i>Dear Don't Move Firewood,</i></p> <p><i><br /></i></p> <p><style>table.MsoNormalTable { font-size: 11pt; font-family: "Calibri","sans-serif"; }</style></p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><i>The idea of stopping invasive insects by not moving firewood is ridiculous.<span> </span></i></p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><i>The emerald ash borer has wings and can move all by himself. By not moving firewood, we are just slowing down a natural process. The reality of not moving firewood will affect hundred of thousands of people that don't have access to firewood for heating with wood or recreational use of fireplaces.<span></span> If the powers that be don't want us to bring firewood into our parks, have the providers of local camp fire wood provide dry seasoned firewood, so that we don't have to use a quart of charcoal liter fluid to get the green wet stuff started.</i></p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><i><br /></i></p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><i>- Gary</i></p> <p class="MsoPlainText"> </p> <p class="MsoPlainText">Dear Gary,</p> <p class="MsoPlainText">1) I disagree that it is ridiculous. I think it is an important step.</p> <p class="MsoPlainText">2) Nobody is denying pests spread naturally over time. But they spread very slowly, and in fairly predictable ways. When you move firewood, pests jump all over the country very, very quickly. It makes everything about the situation harder, more expensive, and more damaging.</p> <p class="MsoPlainText">3) Invasive insects are not natural- they are accidentally imported from another place. This is not a natural process. Yes, though, you are right that we are slowing it down!</p> <p class="MsoPlainText">4) We never say you can't burn wood. Just only move it short distances. Go ahead and heat your home or campsite or cabin with it. We don't even say to use only heat-treated wood, or seasoned wood, or kiln dried wood. Don't Move Firewood really only advocates one thing- getting firewood from a trusted local source, near where you will burn it!</p> <p class="MsoPlainText">5) You are ABSOLUTELY RIGHT that if campers could trust that they had free, dry wood at each campground that they went to, firewood movement would decline. It is a great point. So great, in fact, that campsites are starting to attempt to do this all over the continent, and trying to get the word out so that people know they will have a fire waiting for them. But in the meantime...</p> <p class="MsoPlainText"> </p> <p class="MsoPlainText">Don't Move Firewood.</p> <style type="text/css"></style> don't move firewood firewood ridiculous Mon, 13 Sep 2010 21:12:59 +0000 L. Greenwood 711 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org What do suitcases and firewood have in common http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/what-do-suitcases-and-firewood-have-common.html <p>Bed bugs are creepy little things that are spreading like crazy because of increasingly mobile people in a fast paced, internationally fluid world of commerce, travel, and human movement.</p> <p> </p> <p>Sound familiar? Same thing with forest pests. So let's compare:</p> <p> </p> <p>Bed bugs; common in other countries</p> <p>Invasive forest pests; come from other countries</p> <p> </p> <p>Bed bugs; resurgence from more internation movement of people and goods</p> <p>Invasive forest pests; increasing because of more international movement of firewood, packaging materials, and commercial goods, especially plant imports</p> <p> </p> <p>Bed bugs: spread once established via infested luggage or furniture</p> <p>Invasive forest pests: spread once established via  infested firewood or other untreated wood</p> <p> </p> <p>Bed bugs; cause economic damage and are really hard to get rid of once established</p> <p>Invasive forest pests; exactly the same!</p> <p> </p> <p>Bed bugs; carry no diseases and kill nobody</p> <p>Invasive forest pests; carry many tree diseases, and kill millions of trees every year.</p> <p> </p> <p>I'll stop now.</p> <p> </p> <p>This post, by the way, was inspired by a great article in the New York Times titled "<a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/06/nyregion/06towns.html?_r=1&amp;scp=1&amp;sq=emerald%20ash%20borer&amp;st=cse">Bedbugs? Other Strange Invaders Threaten Much Wider Damage</a>" by Peter Applebome. He takes a different slant on the comparison, but is just as informative and alarmed as he should be. Go read it!</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Pests in the News bed bugs don't move firewood Emerald ash borer firewood infestation new york new york times Thu, 09 Sep 2010 22:19:50 +0000 L. Greenwood 712 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org What does Don't Move Firewood do? http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/what-does-dont-move-firewood-do.html <p>Don’t Move Firewood isn’t just a single website. We are constantly changing and diversifying our outreach methods to reach more people in more places. So what do we really do?</p> <p> </p> <p><b>We give away stuff. Lots of stuff.</b></p> <p> </p> <p>Don’t Move Firewood gives away thousands and thousands of stickers, magnets, window clings, fake tattoos, and DVDs every year to fellow outreach professionals. Staffing a booth about firewood regulations at the state fair? Teaching a master gardener’s class? Going to the big annual boy scout gathering in your state? We have some stickers waiting for you! All you have to do is ask. Check out our<a href="https://www.dontmovefirewood.org/content/become-collaborator"> assortment of stuff here</a>.</p> <p><b><br /></b></p> <p><b>We can make customized materials, just for you.</b></p> <p> </p> <p>All over the country, state and federal agencies as well as non-profits and trade groups are getting the word out about the risk of moving firewood. Rather than reinventing the wheel, groups are increasing coming to us for free design services. We’ve made a huge variety of products in the last few years- billboards, posters, banners, postcards, online ads, printed ads, beach balls, fake tattoos, mailing slips, stickers, hats, teeshirts, vests, frisbees, paper fans, even a fully customized deck of cards. We do all the design work and take care of a lot of the technical details with your chosen vendor- all you have to do is work with us to agree on the look and wording, and then you pay for the creation of the final product. In most cases, this will save you thousands of dollars of design fees, while aligning your project with our nationally recognized look, feel, and brand. It’s a great deal.</p> <p>Recently, we’ve made customized products for; CT, ID, MA, MO, MT, NH, NY, OR, PA, VT, WA, and WI. And we have upcoming ideas that we are exploring with new collaborators in CO, SC and TN. So if you want something made, you’ll be in good company. To see some of the stuff we've made in the past, visit our <a href="https://www.dontmovefirewood.org/content/become-collaborator">collaborator page</a>.</p> <p> </p> <p><b><a href="http://twitter.com/dntmovefirewood">Twitter</a>! <a href="http://www.facebook.com/DontMoveFirewood">Facebook</a>! <a href="http://www.youtube.com/user/dontmovefirewood">YouTube</a>! <a href="https://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog.html">Blogging</a>!</b></p> <p> </p> <p>We spread our message through all the newest and most effective online tools. We have a <a href="http://twitter.com/dntmovefirewood">twitter account</a>, a <a href="http://www.facebook.com/DontMoveFirewood">facebook account</a>, and a <a href="http://www.youtube.com/user/dontmovefirewood">YouTube channel </a>with our full assortment of funny and educational videos. We even have a facebook game- <a href="http://www.shredapest.org/">Shred a pest</a>- that lets you try to kill cartoonish forest pests by fire, water, vicious insults or wood chipper. Check it out!</p> <p> </p> <p>And we blog. Occasionally we do guest blogs- so if you ever want to publicize something cool about your own efforts to educate the public about not moving firewood, email me, Leigh, at Lgreenwood at TNC dot org, and I’ll work with you to get something on our site.</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates billboards custom design service customized don't move firewood firewood posters Tue, 31 Aug 2010 20:25:53 +0000 L. Greenwood 713 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org That's What Tree Said in the news! http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/thats-what-tree-said-news.html <p>The <a href="http://www.berkshireeagle.com/">Berkshire Eagle</a> has a small story on our <a href="https://www.dontmovefirewood.org/mass">"That's What Tree Said" campaign</a> in Western Massachusetts- and it is great!</p> <p> </p> <p>Here's my favorite part, "<span id="RDS_site">people taking firewood from one location to another, say for a camping trip, is leading to the destruction of trees, since moving firewood can help foreign pests spread."</span></p> <p> </p> <p><span>Perfect synopsis of the issue. Well done. </span></p> <p> </p> <p><span>To read the whole thing, click <a href="http://www.berkshireeagle.com/community/ci_15884642?source=rss">here</a> and SCROLL DOWN- it is at the bottom of the page and you'll be confused reading about a local WWII pilot if you don't scroll down.<br /></span></p> <style type="text/css"></style> Pests in the News berkshire eagle berkshires firewood massachusetts that's what tree said Thu, 26 Aug 2010 17:53:11 +0000 L. Greenwood 714 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Juniper and Master Gardeners http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/juniper-and-master-gardeners.html <p>We've had some great questions on the <a href="https://www.dontmovefirewood.org/forms/contact-us.html">Contact Us form</a> lately. Keep them coming!</p> <p> </p> <p>Here are two more;</p> <p> </p> <p>Jeremy in Oregon asks...</p> <p><i>Dear Don't Move Firewood-</i></p> <p><i>Is it safe to buy Juniper from central Oregon and bring it to portland Oregon. the wood is moved about 100 miles from were is was cut.</i></p> <p> </p> <p>The commonly accepted maximum distance for moving firewood is 50 miles, so taking it 100 miles is too far to be considered safe or appropriate. Can you find a closer source of Juniper, or use a different kind of firewood from a more local tree? That would be better.</p> <p> </p> <p>Cathy, a Master Gardener, asks...</p> <p><i>Dear Don't Move Firewood-<br /></i></p> <p><i>I am a Master Gardener and Master Conservationist and I was wondering if you could help me out. I help set up public displays and I would love some bug tattoos and a tree shirt..t-shirt...and any other fun items. Could you help me? Thanks for your time.</i></p> <p> </p> <p>Absolutely! We often provide small giveaways to folks like Master Gardeners, extension agents, and environmental educators. Normally we provide a few hundred of one of these items- stickers, magnets, vinyl clings, or tattoos. So Cathy, I'll be in touch via email! And if anyone else is interested in our giveaways and customized products, visit our <a href="https://www.dontmovefirewood.org/content/become-collaborator">Become a Collaborator</a> page!</p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates 100 miles 50 miles firewood juniper master gardener Wed, 18 Aug 2010 16:23:42 +0000 L. Greenwood 715 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Two new bugs in Tennessee http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/two-new-bugs-tennessee.html <p>July was rough for Tennessee. Emerald ash borer (EAB) was discovered near a truck stop off I-40, which was the first time EAB has been found in the state. And Thousand cankers disease (TCD), a particularly worrisome beetle/fungus combination tree affliction that kills walnut trees, was discovered in a large and well established infestation in East Tennessee. This is a death sentence for walnut trees all over the region, and a huge disappointment for everyone that thought that TCD still had not gotten East of Colorado.</p> <p>This article provides a nice synopsis of the discoveries, and it has a good emphasis on not moving firewood: <br /><a target="_blank" href="https://news.tennesseeanytime.org/node/5684">"Thousand Cankers Disease Discovered in East Tennessee"</a> from TN.gov's Newsroom. </p> <p>We haven't talked much about walnuts and TCD on Don't Move Firewood, so here is a little information. Walnut trees are a very important tree for fine woodworkers, urban dwellers (they make nice shade trees), and for wildlife. They are one of the only remaining native trees (aside from oaks) that produce huge amount of nuts, and so walnut production is important to native wildlife populations- such as turkeys and bears. Sadly, populations of other large nut producing trees like beechnut and chestnut have already been reduced or destroyed by non-native tree diseases. </p> <p>Up until now, Thousand cankers disease was thought by scientists to be only present on the Western half of the continent, with affected trees all along the Western coastal states, as well as some parts of Colorado. With this new discovery in Tennessee, we now know that walnuts on the Eastern half of North America are also at great risk.</p> <p> </p> <p>To learn more about Tennessee's new discoveries, visit their <a target="_self" href="http://tn.gov/agriculture/regulatory/eab.html">EAB</a> or <a href="http://tennessee.gov/agriculture/regulatory/tcd.html">TCD</a> pages.</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Outbreaks ash don't move firewood EAB Emerald ash borer TCD Tennessee thousand cankers disease TN walnut Tue, 17 Aug 2010 20:33:25 +0000 L. Greenwood 716 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org More questions from you! http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/more-questions-you.html <p>I got another great question from our Contact Us form last week, and wanted to share it. This question is from Daniel.</p> <p> </p> <p><i>Dear Don't Move Firewood,</i></p> <p><i><br /></i></p> <p><i>Due to the high price of firewood at or near our campgrounds, I usually cut up pallets and pallet tops to use as firewood while camping. Is this OK since it has been kiln dried? Thanks! </i></p> <p> </p> <p>Dear Daniel-</p> <p> </p> <p>This is a good start, although a slightly imperfect solution.The first problem is that not all wood pallets are kiln dried, so unless you are 100% certain it is kiln dried (i.e. you can clearly identify the HT initials next to the pallet's IPPC logo) the wood still may contain viable pests. So that's a major issue if your pallets are unlabeled. If that's the case, you are potentially still spreading pests.</p> <p> </p> <p>But, for the sake of argument, let's just say that you in fact do have access to a set of kiln dried pallets. That's totally possible if you work in certain sectors of the an import/export industry. So let's go with it! If your pallets are definitely heat treated, then your cutting them up and bringing them is a very safe, but not 100% perfect, activity. There is still a very small risk that you'll transport fungal spores, or perhaps in the worst case- egg cases- to your destination. But these are very unlikely. You are pretty much on the right track here.</p> <p> </p> <p>Lastly, some campground bar ALL firewood, regardless of type or treatment, because they are extremely concerned about pests. In this case, you'll be pretty frustrated to arrive with your bucked up pallets. And a few campgrounds bar dimensional lumber or industrial lumber for fear of odd things like brackets and rusty nails ending up in the ashes, where they could cut a child or park worker. Those are exceptions, but they do happen. So it might be wise to call ahead if you are visiting a new campground where you don't know the rules.</p> <p> </p> <p>Thanks for asking!</p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <style type="text/css"></style> Outbreaks firewood firewood safety kiln dried pallets wood types Tue, 10 Aug 2010 20:39:46 +0000 L. Greenwood 717 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org The Nature Conservancy blog and firewood http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/nature-conservancy-blog-and-firewood.html <p>Cool Green Science, a blog on The Nature Conservancy's website (Nature.org), features a great story on the <a target="_self" href="http://blog.nature.org/2010/07/beetle-mania-keeping-the-asian-longhorned-beetle-at-bay/?src=sp5">Asian longhorned beetle this week</a>.</p> <p> </p> <p>Here's my favorite part, of course;</p> <p>"Also, as you head off to hike, camp and swim this summer, <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/" target="_blank"><b>leave your firewood at home</b></a>."</p> <p> </p> <p>It is worth noting here, in the interest of full disclosure, that Don't Move Firewood is actually owned and operated by The Nature Conservancy as part of their (our!) work with the Continental Dialogue on Non-native Insects and Diseases. This site has many other partners too- like the US Forest Service, and Purdue University, to name just two. If you ever want to learn more about what Don't Move Firewood is really like "under the hood," contact me, Leigh, at LGreenwood (at) TNC (dot) org. Or go visit our <a href="https://www.dontmovefirewood.org/about.html">About</a> page for details. We are always looking for more like-minded agencies and NGOs to collaborate with in the fight against firewood mediated pest transport!</p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <style type="text/css"></style> Pests in the News asian longhorned beetle boston firewood the nature conservancy Tue, 10 Aug 2010 20:16:52 +0000 L. Greenwood 718 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Maine ban on firewood http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/maine-ban-firewood.html <p>The Portland Press Herald recently reported on the firewood ban in Maine, enacted April 1st- specifically, how it lacks enforcement and isn't yet totally hashed out.</p> <p> </p> <p>Specifically, the Herald stated, "Officials have stepped up an education campaign about the dangers of bringing firewood into Maine, but there are no regulations in place setting penalties for violations or specifying what becomes of confiscated wood." Read the whole article here, "<a target="_self" href="http://www.pressherald.com/news/ban-on-using-out-of-state-firewood-still-lacks-enforcement-guidelines-_2010-08-03.html">Ban on using out-of-state firewood still lacks enforcement guidelines."</a></p> <p> </p> <p>I'm torn by this. Yes, it would be great if there was stiff enforcement, excellent definition of the exact rule, and widespread awareness. But right now, Maine is still at the head of the pack on firewood- at least they have a ban! I know that's sort of a sad perspective, but it is true.</p> <p> </p> <p>So before we throw too many tomatoes, think of it this way; Maine is being proactive and prudent. They are acting before a crisis- instead of reacting too late. I think that deserves plenty of credit.</p> <p> </p> <style type="text/css"></style> Pests in the News enforcement firewood firewood ban maine ME Wed, 04 Aug 2010 15:19:32 +0000 L. Greenwood 719 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Questions from YOU! http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/questions-you.html <p>I've received two really good questions in the last few weeks, so I thought I'd post the questions and my answers on the blog for all to see. The first is from a woman named Kirsta. She writes;</p> <p><b><i><br /></i></b></p> <p><b><i>Dear DMF,</i></b></p> <p><b><i>I have a large pile of firewood in my back yard that I would like to get rid of. What is a safe way to dispose of it?</i></b></p> <p> </p> <p>Well Kirsta, there are two basic options that are safe. One is that you burn it yourself on your property. Do you have a woodstove, bonfire pit, or fireplace? That'd be the easiest. Throw a party and burn it all! Just make sure to follow local fire safety rules if you chose that one, and go easy on the lighter fluid!</p> <p> </p> <p>The next option is to give it to a trusted neighbor, someone you know will use it on their property or in their own home. Maybe the folks down the street have a woodstove and would be thrilled to take it to heat their home this winter. If you are only moving it down the road, there is no real harm that can be done. I hope that helps!</p> <p> </p> <p>This second question is a little more complicated, but here at DMF, we can handle it! This one is from Jenny.</p> <p> </p> <p><i><b>Dear DMF,</b></i></p> <p><i><b> I'm very curious why we aren't allowed to move firewood but it's ok to move living trees (via tree farm or nursery) or dead (xmas). If the experts can't tell in dead wood how can they in living. Also - why are wooden pallets still being used when it seems that's how a lot of these things got here in the first place? Thanks for your time.</b></i></p> <p> </p> <p>Jenny, you've clearly thought long about this, and you are right. Moving living trees or recently dead trees can also be problematic, and can definitely spread pests. The difference lies mostly in the chances of causing harm- and firewood, being an almost entirely decentralized and unregulated industry, has a much higher chance of causing harm. In both the cases of nurseries and christmas trees, there is a very good chance that the tree originates from a professional establishment that has a vested interest in keeping their trees healthy. It isn't a perfect answer, but sure is true that folks like nursery owners would be likely to spot pests, as well as motivated to prevent them because of their own economic interest in keeping their business healthy.</p> <p> </p> <p>The second question, about pallets, is also a tough one. Wooden pallets are inexpensive and surprisingly environmentally friendly. They are mostly made from wood that could serve no other purpose- almost like recycled material, but not quite. So part of the reason we still use them is economic. The other thing is that the real issue wasn't wooden pallets themselves, it was untreated and uninspected international wooden pallets that we used to import. We now treat and inspect them. So that makes a big difference.</p> <p> </p> <p>Got questions? We might have answers. Email us at contact@dontmovefirewood.org</p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates backyard bonfire christmas trees firewood nursery stock questions Thu, 22 Jul 2010 21:44:29 +0000 L. Greenwood 720 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Firewood is like Storm Troopers http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/firewood-storm-troopers.html <p>The Asian longhorned beetle has been compared to Darth Vader more than once, and with some good reasons. In a recent article in the <a target="_blank" href="http://www.metrowestdailynews.com/news/x104355565/How-far-has-the-Asian-longhorned-beetle-spread">MetroWest Daily News</a> out of Framingham MA, they said the ALB is, "Nicknamed the "Darth Vader" bug because of its shiny, black shell and ominous presence, the invasive species has no natural predators..."</p> <p> </p> <p>I admit this is an imperfect comparison, but an interesting one. Darth Vader didn't start out evil- he became evil when he converted to the dark side. Asian longhorned beetles aren't intrinsically bad. While they are indeed agricultural (tree farms) pests in their native range in Asia, they only become hugely damaging and out of control when they are accidentally transported into a new area (like Chicago or Worcester).</p> <p> </p> <p>Similarly to the evil that deeply penetrated Darth Vader, allowing him to try to kill his own son, the damage done to a tree infested with Asian longhorned beetles is internal, and it takes a long time to manifest itself. Once completely penetrated, neither a maple nor Anakin Skywalker can recover.</p> <p> </p> <p>And without the benefit of being a truely devoted fan of the Star Wars series, let me draw this one final parallel. Darth Vader was only able to achieve the damage he did because his influence was spread throughout the galaxy. Likewise, the Asian longhorned beetle is only a really terrible threat when it spreads (most often via firewood) and if it is found before it gets entrenched in an area, it isn't nearly as problematic.</p> <p> </p> <p>In conclusion, firewood is like a group of errant Storm Troopers, spreading the dark side of the force. Don't go to the dark side. Don't Move Firewood.</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Outbreaks ALB asian longhorned beetle boston forest health MA massachusetts Tue, 13 Jul 2010 19:31:37 +0000 L. Greenwood 721 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Boston beetle background http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/boston-beetle-background.html <p>Wondering how an Asian longhorned beetle might wind up on the grounds of a hospital in the middle of Boston? Clint McFarland from the USDA has a good theory... "The beetles likely were brought in by someone visiting Faulkner Hospital with firewood or brush..."</p> <p> </p> <p>Yup. Firewood.</p> <p> </p> <p>See the whole article here;<a href="http://www.bostonherald.com/news/regional/view/20100708officials_say_to_expect_more_beetle_sightings/srvc=home&amp;position=also"> Officials say to expect more beetle sightings</a> in the July 8th Boston Herald</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Outbreaks ALB Arnold Arboretum asian longhorned beetle boston Faulkner Hospital MA massachusetts Thu, 08 Jul 2010 21:43:45 +0000 L. Greenwood 722 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Boston Asian longhorned beetle infestation http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/boston-asian-longhorned-beetle-infestation.html <p>Boston's first Asian longhorned beetle infestation was found in Jamaica Plain over the 4th of July long weekend. Six trees were confirmed infested, and those trees have already been removed to kill the beetles within them. More trees may be found- but it is too early to say. We'll keep this blog updated as things progress. In the mean time...</p> <p> </p> <p><b>What can you do to help?</b></p> <p> </p> <p>- Tell everyone you know not to move firewood. Send them to us, here, at <a href="http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/">DontMoveFirewood.org</a></p> <p> </p> <p>- You can learn more about the ALB so that you'll know it if you ever see it. Visit the Massachusetts page <a href="http://massnrc.org/pests/pestFAQsheets/asianlonghorned.html">http://massnrc.org/pests/alb/ </a></p> <p> </p> <p>- Anyone seeing a suspicious beetle should report it immediately at <a href="http://massnrc.org/pests/albreport.aspx">http://massnrc.org/pests/albreport.aspx</a> or toll-free: 1-866-702-9938. Take photos if you can, even if they are just blurry ones on your cell phone.</p> <p> </p> <p>- Bostonians should know they are not alone. Worcester, MA, is fighting the ALB right now. There's a great short documentary called<a href="http://lurkinginthetrees.org/"> Lurking in the Trees</a> about their fight- you can watch the trailer and order copies of the movie at <a href="http://lurkinginthetrees.org/">LurkingintheTrees.org</a></p> <style type="text/css"></style> Outbreaks ALB Arnold Arboretum asian longhorned beetle boston Faulkner Hospital jamaica plain MA massachusetts Tue, 06 Jul 2010 17:39:31 +0000 L. Greenwood 723 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org The infestation next time http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/infestation-next-time.html <p>A new infestation of Asian longhorned beetle was found over the 4th of July weekend in Jamaica Plain- one of the towns in Greater Boston. The six confirmed infested trees were found on the grounds of Faulker Hospital, which is across the street from the Arnold Arboretum.</p> <p> </p> <p>I titled this post "The infestation next time" because I feel like this infestation neatly displays the reality of invasive tree pests. Even though many Massachusetts residents know what ALB looks like as a result of the infestation in Worcester, and even though this is across the street from a very well regarded Arboretum owned by Harvard University, this infestation has been sitting there for a while, and still could have already begun to spread.</p> <p> </p> <p>On a positive note, early reports say that this infestation was found by a tree care company. Good to them for being observant and reporting it quickly!</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Outbreaks ALB Arnold Arboretum asian longhorned beetle boston Faulkner Hospital massachusetts new infestation Tue, 06 Jul 2010 16:24:53 +0000 L. Greenwood 724 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Be safe this weekend http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/be-safe-weekend.html <p>Fourth of July is a great holiday - and one of the biggest camping weekends of the year. Smart campers like you know that moving firewood spreads pests. So what do you do when you notice your friends brought firewood from home? Or someone in the next campsite over has out of state license plates and their own stock of wood?</p> <p> </p> <p>- Tell them about the problem with firewood in simple terms. "Did you know that when you bring firewood from home, that can spread bad bugs that kill trees?"</p> <p> </p> <p>- Make it fun to fix the problem! Tell people that to keep trees safe from the firewood they brought on this trip, all they have to do is have a big bonfire and burn it all at once. It might seem wasteful at first, but remind them that the biggest waste would be if they accidentally started a pest infestation- that could kill thousands of trees, for many years to come.</p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates 4th of July camping celebrating firewood holiday weekend july moving firewood RV camping Thu, 01 Jul 2010 15:59:38 +0000 L. Greenwood 725 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org EAB on the move http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/eab-move.html <p>The EAB is moving, and it now is found in a huge block of states throughout the midwest and mid-atlantic states. Today I read a great blog post about the newest county in PA to have EAB discovered in it- and they are right on the money.</p> <p> </p> <p>"Bedford County is not contiguous with any of the other infested areas. So how did it move? The rapid spread of EAB throughout the Midwest into the east has been attributed to the movement of firewood... Breezewood is a hub of activity for summer vacationers on the move. The Bedford County Visitors Bureau talks about the town in these terms “Some call it The Travelers Oasis, some call it The Gateway to the South or even, The Town of Motels ... there are many names to define Breezewood, PA. All of them center around one thing. Breezewood is a town that is built to serve the traveler.”  "</p> <p> </p> <p>It is just that easy. A hub for travelers is a vulnerable spot for trees these days.</p> <p> </p> <p>To read the whole blog post, visit <a target="_self" href="http://keystonegardening.blogspot.com/2010/06/sightings-by-tom-butzler.html"><br /></a></p> <p><a target="_self" href="http://keystonegardening.blogspot.com/2010/06/sightings-by-tom-butzler.html">http://keystonegardening.blogspot.com/2010/06/sightings-by-tom-butzler.html</a></p> <p> </p> <style type="text/css"></style> Outbreaks dont move firewood EAB Emerald ash borer firewood movement PA pennsylvania Thu, 24 Jun 2010 22:26:37 +0000 L. Greenwood 726 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org What not to do http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/what-not-do.html <p>The Don't Move Firewood blog has dormant lately for technical reasons, but we are back! While we were away, a friend sent me this on email. For background, this friend lives in the Kalispell area, in Montana, which is near Glacier National Park.</p> <p> </p> <p><i>Just got back from Lake Powell in southern Utah. They were selling firewood, for campfires along the lake, for almost $8.00 and the wood came from Kalispell, MT. We were there with some people from Kalispell and one of them had bought firewood in Kalispell that came from Firth, Idaho. The bottom line is that they all got lectured about how firewood from outside the area could be bad. I told them about the sign just south of Kalispell and they mentioned that they had seen the sign but they weren't quite sure what it was all about.Now they know!</i></p> <p> </p> <p>This whole anecdote is depressing on a lot of levels. I'll go through why it saddens me quickly so that you can understand.</p> <p> </p> <p>- At $8/bundle, the price is so high that it clearly dis-incentivizes buying wood at the campsite. That's not good.</p> <p>- Further, that wood wasn't local. Lake Powell is a rather tree-sparse area, so if that wood was clearly labeled as heat treated despite being from far away, that would be fine, too. But that's an exception.</p> <p>- My friend's companions brought their own wood from Idaho! That's crazy.</p> <p>- The billboard that they drove by in Kalispell clearly was not sufficiently informative to get the point across. It is a shame that this opportunity was missed.</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Outbreaks camping firewood Firth ID Kalispell Lake Powell MT travel Utah Tue, 15 Jun 2010 17:40:18 +0000 L. Greenwood 727 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Asian longhorned beetle earns Eagle Scout badge http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/asian-longhorned-beetle-earns-eagle-scout-badge.html <p>In his bid for an Eagle Scout badge, Andrew Parent led a neighborhood survey for Asian longhorned beetle in Springfield, Massachusetts. Under the guidance of a USDA Forest Service agent, Parent mapped his neighborhood and rallied a crew to inspect all the trees for signs of beetle infestation. </p> <p>Check out this soon-to-be Eagle Scout’s inspection route on the<a target="_blank" href="http://www.thereminder.com/Localnews/springfield/parentpicksasianlo/"> </a><a target="_self" href="http://www.thereminder.com/localnews/springfield/parentpicksasianlo/">Reminder Online</a>, and get inspired to do your own neighborhood survey!</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Quarantines asian longhorned beetle eagle scout massachusetts tree survey Wed, 21 Apr 2010 15:11:48 +0000 S. Volkman 409 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Bracing for the green menace in Bismarck http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/bracing-green-menace-bismarck.html <p>Just a few hundred miles away from Bismarck, North Dakota, a <a href="http://www.aphis.usda.gov/publications/plant_health/content/printable_version/EAB-GreenMenace-reprint-June09.pdf" target="_blank">Green Menace</a> is wreaking havoc with city trees—destroying tree-lined streets and causing property damage. </p> <p>That menace is the emerald ash borer. And it made its way into St. Paul, Minnesota in early spring of 2009. Though it hasn’t been detected in nearby North Dakota, the city of Bismarck is bracing for the worst—just in case the invader makes a jump across the border. </p> <p>The Bismarck City Commission is responding to the threat of the emerald ash borer in a<a href="http://www.bismarck.org/DocumentView.aspx?DID=2124" target="_blank"> two-part plan</a>, as reported by the<a href="http://www.bismarcktribune.com/news/local/article_8936feca-2fed-11df-9610-001cc4c03286.html" target="_blank"> Bismarck Tribune</a>:</p> <p>1.Removing ailing ash trees from city streets and replacing them with diverse tree species. <br />2.Telling people not to move firewood from other states or Canada.</p> <p>With more than 7,000 city ash trees at risk on Bismarck's boulevards alone, take heed—leave your firewood at home!</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Pests in the News ash tree Bismarck Emerald ash borer green menace North Dakota Thu, 18 Mar 2010 01:37:25 +0000 S. Volkman 407 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org One thousand more reasons not to move firewood http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/one-thousand-more-reasons-not-move-firewood.html <p>One more big reason to buy firewood locally: Thousand cankers disease – a fungus spread by the walnut twig beetle. </p> <p>So far this disease—of the ‘death by a thousand cuts’ variety—has only been found in black walnut trees in the western part of the US.</p> <p>But worry is growing that black walnuts across the eastern US will be under serious threat if the disease spreads across the Plains. </p> <p>And how does thousand cankers disease spread? You guessed it: People moving firewood, untreated wood and logs.</p> <p>Check out this report produced by<a target="_blank" href="/node/add/story"> Iowa State University</a> Extension Specialists—and don’t miss the great <a target="_blank" href="http://www.ipm.iastate.edu/ipm/hortnews/node/2227">photos</a> at the bottom.</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates Outbreaks Pests in the News black walnut firewood Iowa thousand cankers disease walnut twig beetle Fri, 05 Mar 2010 20:55:29 +0000 S. Volkman 406 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Drug smugglers foiled by Asian longhorned beetle http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/drug-smugglers-foiled-asian-longhorned-beetle.html <p>It turns out that the Asian longhorned beetle has been useful for one thing recently. And it’s not what you might expect—a drug bust.</p> <p>In an unexpected twist of fate, Canadian border patrol agents on alert for invasive pests wound up nabbing drug smugglers for 1.7 tons of hashish. The drugs were hidden—convincingly— in a 19 crate shipment of masks and statues from South Africa.</p> <p>But the would-be drug smugglers’ plans were foiled by the wood used in the crates. Authorities flagged the wood to check for any pests attempting to hitch a ride into the country.</p> <p>According to the <a href="http://www.montrealgazette.com/business/money/Smuggling+plot+small/2582350/story.html" target="_blank">Montreal Gazette article</a>: “The Asian longhorned beetle has been making it onto Canadian Border Service Agency statements as prominently as hashish seizures: The insect’s appetite for such hardwood trees as maple, poplar, willow, elm and birch is so voracious that the border agency describes the species as ‘an invasive quarantine pest.’”</p> <p>Thanks to the good work of the CBSA for keeping out pests of all kinds!</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Pests in the News asian longhorned beetle Canada hashish quarantine Thu, 25 Feb 2010 20:04:46 +0000 S. Volkman 405 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org A call to protect maples in Maine http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/call-protect-maples-maine.html <p>As the Emerald Ash Borer and Asian longhorned beetles threaten to creep their way closer to Maine, legislatures are moving towards prevention before it’s too late. </p> <p>Maine Representative Jeff McCabe introduced a bill last week to restrict the transport of firewood in the state, citing the movement of firewood as “one of the most frequent ways for insects to be moved to new locations.” </p> <p>Among other things, he notes the pests’ threat to maple trees in his home county – Somerset, Maine—the number one producer of maple syrup in the United States. </p> <p>In his article published in <a href="http://www.svweekly.com/joom1511/index.php?option=com_content&amp;view=article&amp;id=1434:-protecting-maine-s-forests-and-street-trees&amp;catid=25:guest&amp;Itemid=136" target="_self">SVWeekly Newspaper</a>, McCabe also gave a nice plug for the PBS premiere last week of Lurking in the Trees on MPBN. The documentary about the Asian longhorned beetle infestation in Worcester, Massachusetts airs throughout the northeast in the coming months. </p> <p>Check out<a href="http://www.lurkinginthetrees.org" target="_self"> www.lurkinginthetrees.org</a> to find out when it will be viewing in your neck of the woods.</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Awards and Recognition Pests in the News asian longhorned beetle firewood lurking in the trees maine maple syrup maples Thu, 11 Feb 2010 20:04:44 +0000 S. Volkman 404 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Ohio means business http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/ohio-means-business.html <p>The state of Ohio just expanded its emerald ash borer quarantine to include 14 more counties -- and they mean business.</p> <p> </p> <p>Fines are up to $4,000 for moving ash trees, parts of ash trees, and all hardwood firewood into or out of the restricted 67 counties in Ohio. Just one more reason not to move firewood!</p> <p> </p> <p>But no matter what state you live in, the lesson is the same: Moving firewood helps tree-killing pests like the emerald ash borer move from one town to the next.</p> <p> </p> <p>Read all about the Ohio quarantine rules--and the hefty consequences--in <a href="http://www.farmanddairy.com/uncategorized/expansion-of-the-emerald-ash-borer-quarantine-necessary-to-stop-problem/14003.html" target="_self">Farm &amp; Dairy </a>Newspaper.</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates Quarantines $4 000 fine Emerald ash borer firewood Ohio quaratine Thu, 04 Feb 2010 23:00:03 +0000 S. Volkman 403 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Good work in CA http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/good-work-ca.html <p>The Californians are really paying attention to the gold spotted oak borer this January, and I wanted to salute the <a href="http://ucanr.org/blogs/venturacountyucce/index.cfm" target="_blank">Ventura County University of California Cooperative Extension</a> blog for a nice, short <a href="http://ucanr.org/blogs/blogcore/postdetail.cfm?postnum=2207" target="_blank">article on GSOB</a>.</p> <p> </p> <p>My favorite part, naturally, reads as follows;</p> <p> </p> <p>" At this time, all we can do is work together to slow the spread of the GSOB with the following steps:</p> <ul> <li>Do not transport oak firewood into or out of campgrounds or parks"</li> </ul> <p> </p> <p>Well said!</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Awards and Recognition Pests in the News CA California firewood gold spotted oak borer GSOB Ventura Ventura County UCCE Wed, 27 Jan 2010 17:19:00 +0000 L. Greenwood 402 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org But if it is already here... http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/if-it-already-here.html <p>People often ask if it isn't thaaaat bad to move firewood if a pest is already established, on the idea of "what further harm can be done?" It is a valid question, so I thought I'd pontificate for a second on that idea and why I disagree.</p> <p> </p> <p>First off, you are probably violating the law. Breaking local quarantines is against the law, and if nothing else, you could be in for a hefty fine. For instance, I just read that <a href="http://www.dispatch.com/live/content/local_news/stories/2010/01/15/more-counties-added-to-ash-borer-quarantine.html?sid=101" target="_blank">14 more counties</a> were added to emerald ash borer quarantines in Ohio, and the fines for moving firewood in those areas can be up to $4000.</p> <p> </p> <p>Secondly, many pest infestations are patchy. That's really important to realize. So if you think "what more harm could I do, it is all doomed anyway?" and you accidentally 'fill in a patch' that might not have been attacked by the pest for another 5 or 10 or 20 years... well, you did a lot of harm by speeding up the process.</p> <p> </p> <p>And lastly, there are things out there that we don't know about. So for instance, if you move wood- even legally- from one place to another that are both heavily infested by one pest, who is to say that the wood wasn't infested with two pests? Maybe you made no difference in the emerald ash borer situation, but instead accidentally created a new spot infestation of gypsy moth? That's not good, either.</p> <p> </p> <p>The bottom line is that it is risky to the health of trees to move firewood very far. Because of what you might not know, or what you might be mistaken about, or just because it is against the law... it is not a good idea.</p> <p> </p> <p>So when you do anything with firewood, make sure it hasn't moved far, and you'll be doing the right thing.</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates EAB Emerald ash borer firewood firewood movement pests quarantines Fri, 22 Jan 2010 19:45:09 +0000 L. Greenwood 401 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Californian oaks in peril http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/californian-oaks-peril.html <p>There are two things currently threatening California's oaks- <i>Phytophthora ramorum</i>, also known as Sudden Oak Death, and the Gold spotted oak borer.</p> <p> </p> <p>Both of these are non-native pests that kill oaks. One is found mostly in wet areas of Northern CA, and the other in certain very dry parts of Southern CA.</p> <p> </p> <p>What else do they have in common? They both can be spread on firewood.</p> <p> </p> <p>Kudos this week to UC's California Agriculture and Natural Resources department for getting a good article published on the threat of the Gold spotted oak borer's potential for movement on firewood. See<a href="http://yubanet.com/regional/Mighty-oaks-succumbing-to-tiny-invasive-beetle-need-public-s-help.php" target="_blank"> that article here.</a></p> <p> </p> <p>And have a great weekend!</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Awards and Recognition Pests in the News gold spotted oak borer live oaks oaks Phytophthora ramorum southern california Sudden Oak Death Fri, 15 Jan 2010 22:57:55 +0000 L. Greenwood 400 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Movie about firewood villains! http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/movie-about-firewood-villians.html <p>Today is a showing of the new documentary, <a href="http://lurkinginthetrees.org/" target="_blank">Lurking in the Trees</a>, about the experience that Worcester MA has had with Asian longhorned beetles. It is being shown at the Massachusetts statehouse in Boston, MA, to state legislators, officials, press, and agency personnel.</p> <p> </p> <p>Asian longhorned beetles are considered one of the top two or three most worrisome pests that can move on firewood. The larvae (like a caterpillar but less cute and fuzzy) are found deep in the wood of the tree, and could easily sit there all winter in a woodpile before emerging as an adult in a new place. And the movie, <a href="http://lurkinginthetrees.org/">Lurking in the Trees</a>, talks explicitly about this threat.</p> <p> </p> <p>The crew at Don't Move Firewood have been deeply involved with this documentary, with our team and supporters ranging in roles from helping with production, providing the crucial funding to allow it to be made, as well as advice and guidance. We are all really proud to have been involved in such an important project.</p> <p> </p> <p>To learn more about this new documentary, or to order a copy so that you can have your own screening to educate the public, visit <a href="http://lurkinginthetrees.org/" target="_blank">Lurkinginthetrees.org</a></p> <p> </p> <p>Happy Monday!</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Awards and Recognition Don't Move Firewood updates Pests in the News ALB asian longhorned beetle documentary firewood lurking in the trees massachusetts massachusetts statehouse worcester Mon, 11 Jan 2010 17:05:58 +0000 L. Greenwood 398 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Stay wood stove safe (and warm) this winter http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/stay-wood-stove-safe-and-warm-winter.html <p>With the rising costs of oil and natural gas, suddenly more people are discovering (and rediscovering) wood stoves to heat their homes this winter.</p> <p>While this heating source offers a cheaper alternative, it comes with safety and environmental considerations that are not as easy as turning up the thermostat.</p> <p>To make sure you'll be both cozy and safe all season long, take a look at the New York State Department of Evironmental Conservation's recommendations--- relevant no matter what state you're in.</p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.thedailystar.com/local/local_story_362040032.html">The Daily Star of Oneonta, NY</a> recently published the recommendations. They include restricting the "movement of firewood more than 50 miles from its source unless it has been heat-treated to prevent the spread of invasive species and diseases, including the Asian longhorned beetle, Emerald ash borer and Asian gypsy moth."</p> <p>The 50 mile firewood restriction is a New York state law, but an important guideline to follow in any state.</p> <style type="text/css"></style> asian longhorned beetle dontmovefirewood Emerald ash borer heating season new york wood stove Wed, 06 Jan 2010 23:08:18 +0000 S. Volkman 397 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Farewell to taco topping? http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/farewell-taco-topping.html <p>Threatening both forest health and delicious taco toppings, the Redbay ambrosia beetle spread laurel wilt disease. Why should you care? Well, laurel wilt disease affects avocado trees, and unfortunately, the movement of firewood could soon bring this disease into North America's prime avocado growing areas.</p> <p> </p> <p>In a recent story titled <a href="http://www.nbcmiami.com/news/local-beat/Deadly-Beetle-Hates-Delicious-Green-Toppings-80135087.html" target="_blank">Miami-Bound Beetle Hates Your Guacamole</a> covered by NBC Miami, this threat is clearly discussed (in a comical fashion). I'm particularly fond of these two paragraphs;</p> <p> </p> <p><i>...Avocado growers and scientists locked in a race against a deadly killer stalking its way from the Carolinas through Georgia and currently found as far south as Central Florida thanks to free rides on firewood transported south. That's right -- the Redbay Ambrosia beetle is coming, threatening to destroy the county's $30 million dollar avocado business even as farmers are enjoying prices nearly 50% higher than a few years ago.</i></p> <p><i><br /></i></p> <p id="paragraph4"><i>Holy guacamole! How would we top our tacos? </i></p> <p> </p> <p>The firewood threat extends all the way into our tacos! So don't move firewood, and protect your guacamole before it is too late.</p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <style type="text/css"></style> Outbreaks Pests in the News ambrosia beetle avocados dont move firewood florida guacamole red bay Redbay Ambrosia beetle Tue, 05 Jan 2010 22:25:44 +0000 L. Greenwood 396 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Trees, wreaths and cones http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/trees-wreaths-and-cones.html <p>Aside from all coming from forest products, what do christmas trees, wreaths, decorative pine cones, and firewood all have in common?</p> <p> </p> <p>All can unintentionally spread forest pests!</p> <p> </p> <p>So as the holidays wind down, make sure that you follow a couple of easy guidelines to dispose of these things in environmentally sound ways.</p> <p> </p> <p>The Don'ts....</p> <p> </p> <p>- Don't just drag an old christmas tree or wreath out into the woods to "let it rot" out there. It could have pests that will emerge later to infest your backyard or woodlot trees.</p> <p>- Don't toss small items (wreaths, mantel decor, decorative pine cones) into your backyard compost,  leaf pile, or hidden corner of your lot. Just like putting them out in the woods, this could allow a pest to spread.</p> <p> </p> <p>The Do's...</p> <p> </p> <p>- Do take advantage of local spent christmas tree collection opportunities, especially if they will chip or commercially compost the trees. These processes (chipping or high temperature efficient composting) will kill most pests.</p> <p>- Do consider burning these things in your fireplace or wood stove. They might not burn too hot or bright (being green and un-aged) but it will eliminate the chance that you'll spread a pest.</p> <p>- If nothing else, sending your tree or other decoration to a landfill isn't great, but it is better than risking spreading a forest pest. So if you can't burn it or otherwise dispose of it wisely, consider just putting it out with the standard trash.</p> <p> </p> <p>And remember- the problem is NOT in using forest products for decor and celebrations. That's fine, and it can help your local economy. The issue is with moving these forest products far and wide and potentially spreading pests. So for next year, and all the years to come, purchase your holiday decorations from only the most local sources you can find. Support the local economy, and</p> <p> </p> <p>HAPPY NEW YEAR! from the friendly people at Don't Move Firewood.</p> <p> </p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates christmas christmas trees firewood holiday decorations holidays Thu, 31 Dec 2009 21:31:20 +0000 L. Greenwood 395 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org 2009 Silver W3 Award! http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/2009-silver-w3-award.html <p>Creative excellence? We sure agree! Don't Move Firewood won another award this year, and we are very proud to let you all know! It is a Silver W3 award. To learn more about this award, please visit <a href="http://w3award.com/awards/" target="_blank">http://w3award.com/awards/</a></p> <p> </p> <p>This is a quick blurb from <a href="http://w3award.com/awards/" target="_blank">their site</a>;</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>The W³</strong> Awards honors creative excellence on the web, and recognizes the creative and marketing professionals behind award winning sites, videos and marketing programs. Simply put, the <strong>W³</strong> is the first major web competition to be accessible to the biggest agencies, the smallest firms, and everyone in between. Small firms are as likely to win as Fortune 500 companies and international agencies.</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Awards and Recognition Don't Move Firewood updates 2009 silver W3 award award dont move firewood recognition Wed, 16 Dec 2009 18:33:31 +0000 L. Greenwood 394 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org 2009 Silver Davey Award! http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/2009-silver-davey-award.html <p>Don't Move Firewood won a new award! Specifically, we won a 2009 Silver Davey Award for creative excellence!</p> <p> </p> <p>As usual, I am excited about us winning an award. I feel like Don't Move Firewood is indeed creative, and excellent. In the case of this specific award, the judging was by the International Academy of the Visual Arts. That sounds pretty great to me.</p> <p> </p> <p>Unfortunately, the way that the Davey Awards are listed, our site is not mentioned by its name. Instead, we are listed under our contractor's name. But please rest assured, we did win! Congratulations to us! To learn more about these awards, visit <a href="http://www.daveyawards.com/" target="_blank">http://www.daveyawards.com/</a></p> <style type="text/css"></style> Awards and Recognition Don't Move Firewood updates 2009 award winning don't move firewood award Thu, 10 Dec 2009 23:12:59 +0000 L. Greenwood 393 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Delaware has lovely trees http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/delaware-has-lovely-trees.html <p>I rarely write about Delaware, but that isn't because it isn't a lovely place with many trees. Delaware happens to not have a lot of problems with forest pests right now. So it was a pleasure to read this well informed article about how to prevent firewood from spreading pests into Delaware, titled<a href="http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/local/ap/firewood-season-sparks-to-life-in-delaware-78619947.html" target="_blank"> Firewood season sparks to life in Delaware.</a></p> <p> </p> <p>I particularly like this part;</p> <p> </p> <blockquote><p>But John Petersen, a spokesman for the Department of Agriculture's forestry division, said people should do their research before hauling away a trailer-full of firewood and cozying up in front of their fires.</p></blockquote> <blockquote><p>Hearthkeepers should avoid buying firewood from other states and regions, he said, because of the threat of introducing invasive insects that could decimate Delaware's living trees. Foremost among these threats are the Asian longhorned beetle, which tunnel and lay eggs in maple trees, and the emerald ash borer, which burrow into ash trees.</p></blockquote> <blockquote><p>"People could come from Maryland to camp in Delaware and inadvertently bring these pests," he said. "If it did come, it'd devastate certain parts of the state."</p></blockquote> <p> </p> <p>Excellently done! Good job summing up the issue, Delawarians!</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates DE delaware EAB Emerald ash borer firewood wood burning Wed, 09 Dec 2009 21:58:31 +0000 L. Greenwood 392 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Have U heard of EAB U? http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/have-u-heard-eab-u.html <p>Did you know that emerald ash borer can be spread by the movement of infested firewood? Of course you did. That's all we talk about around here!</p> <p> </p> <p>But if you want to learn more, many of our partners (like Purdue University, and the USFS, and select people wearing crazy insect costumes) would be delighted if you investigated a new program called <a href="http://www.emeraldashborer.info" target="_blank">Emerald Ash Borer University</a>.</p> <p> </p> <p>The reason I mention this today is while tomorrow's class is on things only marginally related to this site (pesticides, biological control) the next couple of classes starting in 2010 are quite pertinent. So, if this interests you, go check out their class schedule at <a href="http://emeraldashborer.info/eab_university.cfm" target="_blank">http://emeraldashborer.info/eab_university.cfm </a>and preregister for their upcoming webinars. Also, you can cruise the generally informative site on all things emerald ash borer, <a href="http://www.emeraldashborer.info" target="_blank">emeraldashborer.info</a>, and become an expert on little green beetles.</p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates Pests in the News EAB EAB U Emerald ash borer Thu, 03 Dec 2009 22:47:03 +0000 L. Greenwood 391 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Midwesterners urged to buy local firewood http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/midwesterners-urged-buy-local-firewood.html <p>Folks over in Ohio and Minnesota have been spreading the word about the threat of moving firewood, and I think they've been doing a good job.</p> <p> </p> <p>These recent articles that I've seen are quite complete- they talk about the threats from spreading emerald ash borer, gypsy moth, and other pests. They also include information on firewood in general, which is important. When you heat your home with firewood, you should be aware of many things; the heat quality of the wood, where the wood is from, and that you are getting what you pay for.</p> <p> </p> <p>Here's a sampler of good articles;</p> <p> </p> <p><a href="http://www.journal-news.com/news/hamilton-news/buying-firewood-learn-the-lingo-first-421022.html" target="_blank">Buying firewood? Learn the lingo first</a></p> <p>(Ohio Journal News)</p> <p> </p> <p><a href="http://www.startribune.com/local/70717787.html?elr=KArksLckD8EQDUoaEyqyP4O:DW3ckUiD3aPc:_Yyc:aUUT" target="_blank">'Buy local' more than just a snappy motto when it's firewood </a></p> <p>(Minnesota Star Tribune)</p> <p> </p> <p><a href="http://www.news-herald.com/articles/2009/11/27/news/nh1739401.txt" target="_blank">State enforcing strict rules for firewood</a></p> <p>(Ohio News-Herald)</p> <style type="text/css"></style> Don't Move Firewood updates EAB Emerald ash borer firewood gypsy moth local firewood OH Ohio Wed, 02 Dec 2009 22:43:41 +0000 L. Greenwood 390 at http://www.dontmovefirewood.org Proactive firewood measures http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/proactive-firewood-measures.html <p>Banning all firewood from entering Shenandoah National Park is a great idea, and <a href="http://www.news.synavista.com/2009/11/shenandoah-national-park-bans-outside-firewood-starting-2010/" target="_blank">in this article</a> it seems like they've mostly thought through the effects of this upcoming ban on their campers. My only concern is that they are encouraging people to either collect firewood within the park, or buy it from sanctioned vendors. That isn't likely to be a really popular request.</p> <p> </p> <p>I