How to Help

Don’t risk starting a new infestation of an invasive insect or disease.

You have the power to save trees.

Don’t take firewood with you on your camping trip, RV adventure, or up to your hunting camp. Don’t bring firewood back from your second home to your place in the suburbs. Don’t bring it with you on your scout’s camping trip. Instead, buy it where you’ll burn it, or gather firewood on site when permitted.

You can still have a roaring campfire, or a cozy night in front of the fireplace, if you just know how to burn safe.

  • Buy firewood near where you will burn it- a good rule of thumb is only using wood that was cut within 50 miles of where you’ll have your fire. Regulations vary in each state, so visit our Firewood Map to learn more.
  • Certified heat-treated firewood is safe to move long distances. Look for a state or federal stamp or seal on the package, and keep the firewood in the original packaging as much as possible if entering a campground that requires heat treated wood.
  • Some states list their firewood vendors on Firewood Scout, to make finding local firewood easier for everyone. Check their site to see if your state is included!
  • Wood that looks clean and healthy can still have tiny insect eggs, or microscopic fungi spores, that will start a new and deadly infestation. Always leave your backyard firewood at home, even if you think it looks fine.
  • Aged or seasoned wood is still not safe. Just because it is dry doesn’t mean that bugs can’t crawl onto it- and some insects can take several years to mature inside the wood.
  • Tell your friends not to bring wood with them- everyone needs to know that they should not move firewood.
  • Want to learn more? Visit our Frequently Asked Questions!

Burning safe protects everyone- from mountain bikers to hunters, birdwatchers to ATV riders- your family, and ours.

Moving firewood when you camp, hike, go for a hunting trip or take the RV out for a week or two puts our forests in danger. Bringing firewood when camping means you risk carrying tree-killing insects with you inside the firewood. The bugs can crawl out, spread to the trees and forest at the campground or state or national park, and begin to destroy those trees and forests. That means less fun for future outdoor enthusiasts like you.

What can you do to stop the spread of invasive pests on firewood? Tell your friends not to move firewood, especially when camping, hunting, biking, or hiking. Ideally, your firewood should be from only a few miles away, or at least in the same county. Another alternative is buying certified heat treated firewood where available, or gathering firewood on site if that’s permitted in your campground.